New & Notable

Please Please the Bees
Please Please the Bees By Gerald Kelley

Benedict has a pretty sweet life for a bear. Every morning the bees leave a jar of honey on his doorstep, and every day he has honey for breakfast and honey in his tea. It’s an important part of his day. But all that changes when the bees go on strike. Now it’s up to Benedict to listen to the bees, and he realizes there’s a lot more he could be doing to help them. So he fixes up the hive and learns to be a better beekeeper. Will the bees be pleased?
Cleverlands
Cleverlands By Lucy Crehan

As a teacher in an inner-city school, Lucy Crehan was exasperated with ever-changing government policy claiming to be based on lessons from "top-performing" education systems. She became curious about what was really going on in classrooms of the countries whose teenagers ranked top in the world in reading, math, and science. Determined to dig deeper, Lucy set off on a personal educational odyssey through Finland, Japan, Singapore, Shanghai, and Canada, teaching in schools, immersing herself in their very different cultures and discovering the surprising truths about school life that don't appear in the charts and graphs. Cleverlands documents her journey, weaving together her experiences with research on policy, history, psychology, and culture to offer extensive new insights and provide answers to three fundamental questions: How do these countries achieve their high scores? What can others learn from them? And what is the price of this success?
No Country for Jewish Liberals
No Country for Jewish Liberals By Larry Derfner

No Country for Jewish Liberals is Larry Derfner's personal and political story of life in contemporary Israel, describing how an American Jewish emigrant and his adopted country grew apart. Taking readers from his boyhood in Los Angeles as the son of Holocaust escapees, through his coming of age amidst the upheavals of 1960s America, to his move to Israel and controversial career in journalism, Derfner explores Israel's moral decline through the lens of his own experiences. This provocative book blends memoir, reportage, and commentary in a riveting narrative of a society whose mentality of fear and aggression has made it increasingly alien to Jewish liberals.
Japan - Culture Smart!
Japan - Culture Smart! By Paul Norbury

Culture Smart! Japan will guide you through modern Japan's shifting social and cultural maze. It provides invaluable insights into people's attitudes and behavior, and practical tips to help make your visit to this complex, rich, and dynamic society a mutually rewarding experience. Today Japan is at a crossroads. The postwar economic miracle is over and the balance of power in Asia is shifting as new players enter the field. The bedrock of traditional Japanese culture—its remarkable resilience, coherence, and consensus-based philosophy, underpinned by many protocols—until recently regarded by some as a hindrance, is starting to look like a virtue in a world of accelerating change. Japan remains the world's third-largest economy and one of the most attractive and secure destinations for investment. The younger generation is outward-looking, Japanese women have a new confidence, and the country's technical and scientific research capability is as good as it gets. Japan continues to excel at innovation in technology and the "new" sciences, and is among the world's largest funders in research as a percentage of GDP.
Dig Too Deep
Dig Too Deep By Amy Allgeyer

With her mother facing prison time for a violent political protest, seventeen-year-old Liberty Briscoe has no choice but to leave her Washington, DC, apartment and take a bus to Ebbottsville, Kentucky, to live with her granny. There she can at least finish high school and put some distance between herself and her mother—or her former mother, as she calls her. But Ebbottsville isn't the same as Liberty remembers, and it's not just because the top of Tanner's Peak has been blown away to mine for coal. Half the county is out of work, an awful lot of people in town seem to be sick, and the tap water is bright orange—the same water that officials claim is safe. And when Granny's lingering cold turns out to be something much worse, Liberty wonders if somebody at the mine is hiding the truth about the water. She starts to investigate and is soon plunged into a world of secrets, lies, threats, and danger. Her searches for answers and justice lead to even tougher questions—should she turn to violence and end up like her mother? Give up her quest for the sake of keeping the peace? Or keep fighting until the mine is shut down for good?
The Trials of Walter Ogrod
The Trials of Walter Ogrod By Thomas Lowenstein

The horrific 1988 murder of four-year-old Barbara Jean Horn shocked the citizens of Philadelphia. Plucked from her own front yard, Barbara Jean was found dead less than two and a half hours later in a cardboard TV box dragged to a nearby street curb. After months of investigation with no strong leads, the case went cold. Four years later it was reopened, and Walter Ogrod, a young man with autism spectrum disorder who had lived across the street from the family at the time of the murder, was brought in as a suspect.Ogrod bears no resemblance to the composite police sketch based on eyewitness accounts of the man carrying the box, and there is no physical evidence linking him to the crime. His conviction was based solely on a confession he signed after thirty-six hours without sleep. "They said I could go home if I signed it," Ogrod told his brother from the jailhouse. The case was so weak that the jury voted unanimously to acquit him, but at the last second—in a dramatic courtroom declaration—one juror changed his mind. As he waited for a retrial, Ogrod's fate was sealed when a notorious jailhouse snitch was planted in his cell block and supplied the prosecution with a second supposed confession. As a result, Walter Ogrod sits on death row for the murder today.Informed by police records, court transcripts, interviews, letters, journals, and more, award-winning journalist Thomas Lowenstein leads readers through the facts of the infamous Horn murder case in compelling, compassionate, and riveting fashion. He reveals explosive new evidence that points to a condemned man's innocence and exposes a larger underlying pattern of prosecutorial misconduct in Philadelphia. 
Love You Dead
Love You Dead By Peter James

The 12th Roy Grace novel from the highly acclaimed Peter James. An ugly duckling as a child, Jodie Bentley had two dreams in life—to be beautiful and rich. She's achieved the first, with a little help from a plastic surgeon, and now she's working hard on the second. Her philosophy about money is simple. You can either earn it or marry it. Marrying is easy, it's getting rid of the husband afterwards that's harder, that takes real skill. But hey, practice makes perfect. Detective Superintendent Roy Grace is feeling the pressure from his superiors, his previous case is still giving him sleepless nights, there have been major developments with his missing wife Sandy, and an old adversary is back. But worse than all of this is, he now believes, a Black Widow is operating in his city. One with a venomous mind and venomous skills. And he comes to the frightening realisation he may have underestimated just how dangerous this lady is.
RHINO 2017
RHINO 2017 Edited by Ralph Hamilton

RHINO 2017 is our 41st issue, and at 41 years old, RHINO is more than ever committed to presenting a beautiful and compelling print journal, this year presenting our largest collection of poetry ever, with 125 poems compiled from the work of 123 poets and translators. As T.S. Eliot calls poetry "a raid on the inarticulate," continually pushing against the limits of language, it is often an antidote to all that shuts us down, that makes life meager, thinner, more numb, complacent, less meaningful. At its best, poetry can magnify our sense of presence in the world, open us up to the mystery and wonder, no less than the troubled reality and robust beauty all around us. For 41 years, RHINO has sought to be such a "raider," providing an annual selection of the best contemporary poetry in English. This year our "raid" yields a magnificent bounty for the articulate reader indeed.
Look
Look By Jon Nielsen

Artie is a droid programmed to endlessly perform a single task left in a world abandoned by humans. He is starting to wonder what meaning his task has. But when he and his only friend, Owen, a robotic bird, cast aside the only lives they've ever known in search of a brighter future, they encounter others that want nothing but to hold tight to the past. Join Artie the Robot and Owen the Vulture for a light-hearted, sci-fi adventure as they journey far and wide for the answer to one of life's greatest questions: "Why are we here?"
Blood Plagues and Endless Raids
Blood Plagues and Endless Raids By Tony Palumbi

In 2005, the video game World of Warcraft struck the cultural landscape with tidal force. One hundred million people have played WoW in the twelve years since. But those people did more than play. They worked, they fought, they triumphed, they held entire game servers hostage, they even married each other in real life. They developed new identities, swapping their workaday selves for warriors, mages, assassins, and healers. They built communities and rose to lead them. WoW was the world's first mass virtualization: before Facebook or Twitter, millions of people established online identities and had to reckon with the consequences in their real lives.Blood Plagues and Endless Raids explores this wild, incredibly complex culture partly through the author's engaging personal story, from absolute neophyte to leader of North America's top Spanish-speaking guild, but also through the stories of other players and the game's developers. It is the definitive account of one of the world's biggest pop culture phenomena.World of Warcraft is more than ones and zeroes, more than lines of code, and so its history must be more than pushing buttons or slaying dragons. It's the tale of a huge and passionate community of people: the connections they made, the experiences they shared, and the love they held for one another.
I Want to Be a Reader!
I Want to Be a Reader! By Mark Powers, Illustrated by Maria Montag

Sweet story of a young boy and his desire to read. A simple celebration of a major milestone: learning to read! It will take a lot of hard work: learning the letters, turning the pages, saying the words. But that hard work will pay off—maybe sooner than this little boy thinks! The story ends with a hopeful message to toddlers that someday, they can be readers too.
Everybody Had an Ocean
Everybody Had an Ocean By William McKeen

Los Angeles in the 1960s gave the world some of the greatest music in rock 'n' roll history: "California Dreamin'" by the Mamas and the Papas, "Mr. Tambourine Man" by the Byrds, and "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys, a song that magnificently summarized the joy and beauty of the era in three and a half minutes. But there was a dark flip side to the fun fun fun of the music, a nexus between naive young musicians and the hangers-on who exploited the decade's peace, love, and flowers ethos, all fueled by sex, drugs, and overnight success. One surf music superstar unwittingly subsidized the kidnapping of Frank Sinatra Jr. The transplanted Texas singer Bobby Fuller might have been murdered by the Mob in what is still an unsolved case. And after hearing Charlie Manson sing, Neil Young recommended him to the president of Warner Bros. Records. Manson's ultimate rejection by the music industry likely led to the infamous murders that shocked a nation.Everybody Had an Ocean chronicles the migration of the rock 'n' roll business to Southern California and how the artists flourished there. The cast of characters is astonishing—Brian and Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, Jan and Dean, eccentric producer Phil Spector, Cass Elliot, Sam Cooke, Ike and Tina Turner, Joni Mitchell, and scores of others—and their stories form a modern epic of the battles between innocence and cynicism, joy and terror. You'll never hear that beautiful music in quite the same way.
The Day I Ran Away
The Day I Ran Away By Holly L Niner, Illustrated by Isabella Ongaro

A spirited yet soothing story for days when you feel like running away—and a sweet reminder that home is where the hugs (and cookies) are. Winner:Mom's Choice AwardWhile Dad tucks her in, a little girl named Grace calmly recounts her day—which was anything but calm. She had a tantrum (because of some injustices involving a purple shirt and breakfast cereal) and was banished to her bedroom before deciding to run away. Understanding that kids have ups and downs, Grace's mom wisely gave her daughter the space and time she needed to reach her own decision to return home—to open arms.The Day I Ran Away amusingly captures Grace's mutable moods and childlike logic. Warm, humorous digital paintings offer fun details to keep little listeners busy. Kids can compare the bedtime and daytime scenes and try to figure out how Grace got that purple paw-print on her cheek—and when it got washed away. They can mimic Grace's facial expressions or copy her poses for some soothing bedtime yoga. And of course, they can create a safe place to run away to when the injustices of Pre-K existence become too much to bear. A pop-up tent in the yard and the haven beneath the dining room table are excellent run-away destinations, as long as you come home for dinner.
City of Friends
City of Friends By Joanna Trollope

The 20th novel from bestselling author Joanna Trollope. The day Stacey Grant loses her job feels like the last day of her life. Or at least, the only life she'd ever known. For who was she if not a City high-flyer, Senior Partner at one of the top private equity firms in London? As Stacey starts to reconcile her old life with the new—one without professional achievements or meetings, but instead, long days at home with her dog and ailing mother, waiting for her successful husband to come home—she at least has The Girls to fall back on. Beth, Melissa and Gaby. The girls, now women, had been best friends from the early days of university right through their working lives, and through all the happiness and heartbreaks in between. But these career women all have personal problems of their own, and when Stacey's redundancy forces a betrayal to emerge that was supposed to remain secret, their long cherished friendships will be pushed to their limits.
Lost Ballparks
Lost Ballparks By Dennis Evanosky, By Eric J. Kos

Vintage photographs celebrate baseball's forgotten ballparks. With vintage photographs, this book explores classic ballparks of American and National League teams that are no more, such as Boston's Grand Pavilion, home of the Beaneaters, and Huntington Avenue Grounds, one-time home of the Red Sox. Other cities include: Atlanta, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, Detroit, Houston, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Montreal, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Diego, Seattle, Tampa, Toronto, and Washington.
Pirate Women
Pirate Women By Laura Sook Duncombe

In the first-ever Seven Seas history of the world's female buccaneers, Pirate Women: The Princesses, Prostitutes, and Privateers Who Ruled the Seven Seas tells the story of women, both real and legendary, who through the ages sailed alongside—and sometimes in command of—their male counterparts. These women came from all walks of life but had one thing in common: a desire for freedom. History has largely ignored these female swashbucklers, until now. Here are their stories, from ancient Norse princess Alfhild and warrior Rusla to Sayyida al-Hurra of the Barbary corsairs; from Grace O'Malley, who terrorized shipping operations around the British Isles during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I; to Cheng I Sao, who commanded a fleet of four hundred ships off China in the early nineteenth century.Author Laura Sook Duncombe also looks beyond the stories to the storytellers and mythmakers. What biases and agendas motivated them? What did they leave out? Pirate Women explores why and how these stories are told and passed down, and how history changes depending on who is recording it. It's the most comprehensive overview of women pirates in one volume and chock-full of swashbuckling adventures that pull these unique women from the shadows into the spotlight that they deserve. 
Utterly Awesome 501 Things to Draw
Utterly Awesome 501 Things to Draw Illustrated by Barry Green

An easy-to-follow guidebook for budding creatives. Step-by-step instructions guide young artists on how to draw 501 pictures across eight different themes including animals, things that go, space aliens, pirates and funny people. This title develops visual and drawing skills—simply copy a basic shape, look to the next box to see what has been added, then copy it. Ideal for children age 5 and up.
The Ragged Edge
The Ragged Edge By Michael Zacchea, By Ted Kemp, Foreword by Paul D. Eaton

Deployed to Iraq in March 2004 after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, US Marine Michael Zacchea thought he had landed a plum assignment. His team's mission was to build, train, and lead in combat the first Iraqi Army battalion trained by the US military.Quickly, he realized he was faced with a nearly impossible task. With just two weeks' training based on outdated and irrelevant materials, no language instruction, and few cultural tips for interacting with his battalion of Shiites, Sunnis, Kurds, Yazidis, and others, Zacchea arrived at his base in Kirkush to learn his recruits would need beds, boots, uniforms, and equipment. His Iraqi officer counterparts spoke little English. He had little time to transform his troops—mostly poor, uneducated farmers—into a cohesive rifle battalion that would fight a new insurgency erupting across Iraq.In order to stand up a fighting battalion, Zacchea knew, he would have to understand his men. Unlike other combat Marines in Iraq at the time, he immersed himself in Iraq's culture: learning its languages, eating its foods, observing its traditions—even being inducted into one of its Sunni tribes. A constant source of both pride and frustration, the Iraqi Army Fifth Battalion went on to fight bravely at the Battle of Fallujah against the forces that would eventually form ISIS.TDeployed to Iraq in March 2004 after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, US Marine Michael Zacchea thought he had landed a plum assignment. His team's mission was to build, train, and lead in combat the first Iraqi Army battalion trained by the US military.Quickly, he realized he was faced with a nearly impossible task. With just two weeks' training based on outdated and irrelevant materials, no language instruction, and few cultural tips for interacting with his battalion of Shiites, Sunnis, Kurds, Yazidis, and others, Zacchea arrived at his base in Kirkush to learn his recruits would need beds, boots, uniforms, and equipment. His Iraqi officer counterparts spoke little English. He had little time to transform his troops—mostly poor, uneducated farmers—into a cohesive rifle battalion that would fight a new insurgency erupting across Iraq.In order to stand up a fighting battalion, Zacchea knew, he would have to understand his men. Unlike other combat Marines in Iraq at the time, he immersed himself in Iraq's culture: learning its languages, eating its foods, observing its traditions—even being inducted into one of its Sunni tribes. A constant source of both pride and frustration, the Iraqi Army Fifth Battalion went on to fight bravely at the Battle of Fallujah against the forces that would eventually form ISIS.The Ragged Edge is Zacchea's deeply personal and powerful account of hopeful determination, of brotherhood and betrayal, and of cultural ignorance and misunderstanding. It sheds light on the dangerous pitfalls of training foreign troops to fight murderous insurgents and terrorists, precisely when such wartime collaboration is happening more than at any other time in US history.
The Jelly Donut Difference
The Jelly Donut Difference By Maria C Dismondy, Illustrated by P.S. Brooks

The author of the bestselling Spaghetti in a Hot Dog Bun tells a story about the power of paying it forward. Leah and Dexter are brother and sister. They don't always get along. In fact, there are times they can be downright mean to each other. The ooey, gooey jelly donuts in this story are a testament to the power of kindness, caring and generosity. Find out if Leah and Dexter will ever learn to get along! Bite into the power of paying it forward by adding The Jelly Donut Difference to your family's home collection or classroom library.
100 Things Cubs Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die
100 Things Cubs Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die By Jimmy Greenfield

There's never been a better time to be a Cubs fan, and this lively, detailed book explores the personalities, events, and facts every fan should know. More than a look at the century-long wait leading up to the team's unforgettable 2016 World Series win, the book contains crucial information for Cubs faithful, such as important dates, player nicknames, memorable moments, and outstanding achievements by singular players. This guide to all things Cubs also includes a list of must-do Cubs-related activities, which include taking in Wrigley field, traveling to Arizona for spring training, and sipping beers at the best Cubs bars around the country. This updated World Series edition features a new generation of Cubs stars who brought the championship back home to Chicago at last, including manager Joe Maddon, sluggers Anthony Rizzo and Kris Bryant, and more.
Camino a Tenango
Camino a Tenango By Gimena Romero

Tenango de Doria, Mexico, is a snowy, mountainous place, home to many spirits. Camino a Tenango is a cultural project headed by textile artist Gimena Romero. Her goal is to teach people about tenango embroidery, one of the pillars of Mexican indigenous textile art.