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Roarings from Further Out
Roarings from Further Out

Roarings from Further Out

Four Weird Novellas by Algernon Blackwood

Tales of the Weird

FICTION

288 Pages, 5.25 x 7.5

Formats: Trade Paper

Trade Paper, $15.95 (US $15.95) (CA $20.95)

Publication Date: July 2020

ISBN 9780712353052

Rights: US, CA, SAM & MX

British Library Publishing (Jul 2020)

Sorry, this item is temporarily out of stock
 

Overview

Four of the best novellas from one of the most underrated names in horror and weird fiction. Writers such as H. P. Lovecraft rated Blackwood as one of the very best writers of the genre. This title features an introduction and notes contextualizing this characterful author. “It is my firm opinion that…The Willows is the greatest weird tale ever written.” – H.P. Lovecraft

From one of the greatest and most prolific authors of 20th century weird fiction come four of the very best strange stories ever told.

In "The Willows," two men become stranded on an island in the Danube delta, only to find that they might be in the domain of some greater power from beyond the limits of human experience.

"The Wendigo" features a hunting party in Ontario who begin to fear that they are being stalked by an entity thought to be confined to legend.

In "The Man Whom the Trees Loved," a couple is driven apart as the husband is enthralled by the possessive and jealous spirits dwelling in the nearby forest.

And lastly, in conversation with the occult detective and physician Dr. John Silence, a traveler relates his nightmarish visit to a strange town in Northern France, and the maddening secret from his past revealed by its inhabitants, in "Ancient Stories."

Author Biography

Algernon Blackwood (1869-1951) was a prolific English writer of short stories and novels, as well as a consistent contributor to radio and early television. His regular appearances reading his weird fiction and ghost stories for these platforms earned him the popular epithet of "The Ghost Man."