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Washington's Rebuke to Bigotry
Washington's Rebuke to Bigotry

Washington's Rebuke to Bigotry

Reflections on Our First President's Famous 1790 Letter to the Hebrew Congregation In Newport, Rhode Island

HISTORY

320 Pages, 6.14 x 8.95

Formats: Trade Paper, EPUB

Trade Paper, $15.95 (US $15.95) (CA $21.95)

Publication Date: July 2015

ISBN 9781940457116

Rights: WOR

Facing History and Ourselves (Jul 2015)

eBook

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Overview

George Washington’s 1790 Letter to the Hebrew Congregation in Newport, Rhode Island, a foundational document in the history of religious freedom in the United States, embodies a vision of religious harmony that remains deeply pertinent in our increasingly diverse society. In Washington’s Rebuke to Bigotry, scholars from across the disciplines use the letter as a springboard to engage with important and timely questions regarding religious freedom, religious diversity, and civic identity. Washington’s Rebuke to Bigotry introduces readers to the complexities of the historical moment in which Washington wrote the letter, when America’s founding leaders were negotiating how the new democracy would approach religious difference. Many essays in this collection also bring the spirit of Washington’s letter into the present, reflecting on contemporary issues such as gay rights in the United States, restrictions on religious practice in the public sphere in European countries, and the place of religion in education.

Author Biography

Facing History and Ourselves is an international educational and professional development organization whose mission is to engage students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice, and antisemitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. By studying the historical development of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make connections between history and the moral choices they confront in their own lives.