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The Reconstruction Era and The Fragility of Democracy
The Reconstruction Era and The Fragility of Democracy

The Reconstruction Era and The Fragility of Democracy

HISTORY

305 Pages, 8.49 x 10.87

Formats: Trade Paper, EPUB

Trade Paper, $28.95 (US $28.95) (CA $39.00)

Publication Date: March 2015

ISBN 9781940457109

Rights: WOR

Facing History and Ourselves (Mar 2015)

eBook

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Overview

The Reconstruction Era and The Fragility of Democracy uses our pedagogical approach to help students examine how a society rebuilds after extraordinary division and trauma, when the ideals of democracy are most vulnerable. The unit presents educators with materials they need to engage students in a deep study of the pivotal era of American history that followed the Civil War. It provides history teachers with dozens of primary and secondary source documents, close reading exercises, lesson plans, and activity suggestions that will push students both to build a complex understanding of the dilemmas and conflicts Americans faced during Reconstruction and to identify the legacies of this history that extended through the 20th century to the present day.  These materials will help students examine closely themes such as historical memory, justice, and civic participation in a democracy. The unit includes a variety of interdisciplinary teaching strategies that reinforce historical and literacy skills. 

Author Biography

Facing History and Ourselves is an international educational and professional development organization whose mission is to engage students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice, and antisemitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. By studying the historical development of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make connections between history and the moral choices they confront in their own lives.