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Now We Can Talk Openly about Men
Now We Can Talk Openly about Men

Now We Can Talk Openly about Men

POETRY

88 Pages, 5.5 x 8.5

Formats: Trade Paper, Mobipocket, EPUB, PDF

Trade Paper, $13.00 (US $13.00) (CA $18.00)

Publication Date: May 2018

ISBN 9781784105785

Rights: US, CA, NZ, CAM, SAM, CAR, PH, KR & FM

Carcanet Press, Ltd. (May 2018)
Carcanet Press Ltd.

eBook

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Overview

Martina Evans's Now We Can Talk Openly about Men is a pair of dramatic monologues, snapshots of the lives of two women in 1920s Ireland. The first, Kitty Donovan, is a dressmaker in the time of the Irish War of Independence. The second, Babe Cronin, is set in 1924, shortly after the Irish Civil War. Kitty is a dressmaker with a taste for laudanum. Babe is a stenographer who has fallen in love with a young revolutionary. Through their separate, overlapping stories, Evans colours an era and a culture seldom voiced in verse. Set back some years from their stories, both women find a strand of humour in what took place, even as they recall the passion, vertigo and terror of those times. A dream-like compulsion in their voices adds a sense of retrospective inevitability. The use of intense, almost psychedelic colour in the first half of the book opposes the flattened, monochrome language of the second half. This is a work of vivid contrasts, of age and youth, women and men, the Irish and the English: complementary stories of balance, imbalance, and transition.

Reviews

"...a subtle, challenging writer with a wonderfully destructive approach to the pieties she describes."—John McAuliffe, Irish Times

Author Biography

Martina Evans grew up in County Cork and trained in Dublin as a radiographer before moving to London in 1988. She is the author of eleven books poetry and prose. She has won several awards including the Premio Ciampi International Prize for Poetry in 2011. Burnfort, Las Vegas (Anvil Press, 2014) was shortlisted for the 2015 Irish Times Poetry Now Award. Mountainy Men, a narrative poem, was the recipient of a Grants for the Arts Award in 2015. She is a Royal Literary Fund Advisory Fellow and reviews for the Irish Times.