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Bank Robbery
Bank Robbery

Bank Robbery

The way we create money, and how it damages the world

BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

204 Pages, 5.5 x 8.5

Formats: Trade Paper

Trade Paper, $16.95 (US $16.95) (CA $22.95)

Publication Date: January 2020

ISBN 9781911193647

Rights: US & CA

Triarchy Press Ltd (Jan 2020)

Price: $16.95
 
 

Overview

Our money system is a toxic left-over from a time when theft on a grand scale – war and empire-building – was glorified. Today, we need to move on from a system that allows and encourages the worst in us (and the worst among us) to prosper. We take the money system for granted. We accept that banks have the right to create, rent out and then destroy money. We accept that banks have a right to charge us (and our government) interest on this money. We accept that the system enhances inequality, drives climate change, degrades our planet, promotes war and conflict, and has always led to eventual disaster. But why do we accept this manifestly undemocratic money system, which serves only to concentrate power and wealth in the hands of organisations and individuals that have profit – not our collective interests – at heart? Curious to find the answer, researcher and writer Ivo Mosley set out to uncover – and tell – the story of how money-creation works and how it came to be this way. Many years in the writing, this book is not an attack on individuals or a rant against bankers. Rather it's a remarkably clear and comprehensive examination of a system that supports unaccountable and destructive power. It also points the way to the simple reforms that are necessary if we wish to create a more just and equitable world.

Author Biography

Ivo Mosley is a respected journalist and author of several books including Democracy, Fascism and the New World Order and In The Name of the People. In writing them, he became interested in money-creation by banks–identifying it as the murkiest of all institutionalised practices in our political system. He is a vocal critic of his grandfather's politics, often commenting publicly on the "evil legacy" of fascism.