The Harvey Milk Interviews
The Harvey Milk Interviews

The Harvey Milk Interviews

In His Own Words

Edited by Vince Emery, By Harvey Milk

BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY

360 Pages, 6 x 9

Formats: Trade Paper

Trade Paper, $19.95 (US $19.95) (CA $26.95)

Publication Date: December 2017

ISBN 9780985505318

Rights: WOR

Vince Emery Productions (Dec 2017)

Price: $19.95
 
 

Overview

This acclaimed collection presents gay hero Harvey Milk in 39 unrehearsed conversations, all linked with biographical stories. They include three famous debates between Milk and John Briggs over the notorious Proposition 6 Briggs Initiative. Milk describes his struggles, strategies, and dreams in his own words, so we see how his laugh-out-loud wit, outrage over injustice, and inspiring actions shaped our lives today. This new edition is updated, expanded, and in paperback for the first time.

Author Biography

Vince Emery, editor of The Harvey Milk Interviews: In His Own Words, wrote the bestseller How to Grow Your Business on the Internet, which won Glyph Awards as both Best Business Book of the Year and Best Computer Book of the Year and was translated into eight languages. Emery edited Lost Stories by Dashiell Hammett, which was chosen as a featured alternate selection by both the book of the Month Club and the Mystery Guild. Booklist said: "Emery does a fantastic job of bringing Hammett the accomplished writer and Hammett the struggling writer alive." Emery wrote or co-wrote four additional books. He lives near San Francisco. Harvey Milk (1930-1978) was named "one of the 100 most important people of the twentieth century" by Time Magazine. His life and work have inspired millions of people around the world. When Milk was elected a supervisor of the City and County of San Francisco, he became the first openly gay person elected to office in California. In spite of death threats, he supported a wide range of human rights, environmental, labor, and free speech issues across North America. Milk and San Francisco Mayor George Moscone were assassinated in 1978. Since his death, Milk has been the subject of Academy Award-winning films, books, plays, and a grand opera. President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Milk the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America's highest civilian honor.