New & Notable

Cook County ICU
Cook County ICU By Cory Franklin

An inside look at one of the nation's most famous public hospitals, Cook County, as seen through the eyes of its longtime Director of Intensive Care, Dr. Cory Franklin. Filled with stories of strange medical cases and unforgettable patients culled from a thirty-year career in medicine, Cook County ICU offers readers a peek into the inner workings of a hospital. Author Dr. Cory Franklin, who headed the hospital's intensive care unit from the 1970s through the 1990s, shares his most unique and bizarre experiences, including the deadly Chicago heat wave of 1995, treating some of the first AIDS patients in the country before the disease was diagnosed, the nurse with rare Munchausen syndrome, the first surviving ricin victim, and the famous professor whose Parkinson's disease hid the effects of the wrong medication. Surprising, darkly humorous, heartwarming, and sometimes tragic, these stories provide a big-picture look at how the practice of medicine has changed over the years, making it an enjoyable read for patients, doctors, and anyone with an interest in medicine. Read more...
Life for a Life
Life for a Life By T. Frank Muir

When a young woman's half-frozen body is found on Fife's Coastal Path, buried in snow and with the remnants of a rope manacle around her wrist, DCI Gilchrist takes the case. But Gilchrist's investigation uncovers a bloody trail of shootings and executions that lead him to the heart of a human trafficking war. Links to Scotland's foremost criminal family, the Home Office, and a ruthless killer intent on expanding his territory pull Gilchrist deeper into this murderous web until he comes face-to-face with the most dangerous man he has ever met. Read more...
The Badger
The Badger By William Fotheringham

Bernard Hinault is one of the greatest cyclists of all time. He is a five-time winner of the Tour de France and the only man to have won each of the Grand Tours on more than one occasion. In The Badger, bestselling author William Fotheringham finally gets to the bottom of this fascinating character and explores the reasons why France, the nation that considers itself cycling's home, has found it so hard to produce a successor. Hinault was the last "old-school" champion: a larger-than-life character from a working-class background, capable of winning on all terrains, in major Tours and one-day Classics. Nicknamed "The Badger" for his combative style, he led a cyclists' strike in his first Tour and instigated a legendary punch-up with demonstrators in 1982 while in the middle of a race. Hinault's battles with teammates Laurent Fignon and Greg LeMond provide some of the greatest moments in Tour history, and here they are made vivid once again. Read more...
Poems from the Second World War
Poems from the Second World War By Gaby Morgan

Poems from the Second World War is a moving and powerful collection of poems written by soldiers, nurses, mothers, sweethearts, and family and friends who experienced WWII from different standpoints. The Imperial War Museum was founded in 1917 to collect and display material relating to the "Great War," which was still being fought. Today IWM is unique in its coverage of conflicts, especially those involving Britain and the Commonwealth, from World War I to the present. They seek to provide for, and to encourage, the study and understanding of the history of modern war and wartime experience.. Read more...
My Life, My Body
My Life, My Body By Marge Piercy

In a candid and intimate new collection of essays, poems, memoirs, reviews, rants, and railerries, Marge Piercy discusses her own development as a working-class feminist, the highs and lows of TV culture, the ego dances of a writer's life, the homeless and the housewife, Allen Ginsberg and Marilyn Monroe, feminist utopias (and why she doesn't live in one), why fiction isn't physics; and of course, fame, sex, and money, not necessarily in that order. The short essays, poems, and personal memoirs intermingle like shards of glass that shine, reflect—and cut. Always personal yet always political, Piercy's work is drawn from a deep well of feminist and political activism. Also featured is an Outspoken Interview, in which the author lays out her personal rules for living on Cape Cod, caring for cats, and making marriage work. Read more...
The Pittsburgh Steelers Playbook
The Pittsburgh Steelers Playbook By Steve Hickoff

The X's and O's behind the Steelers' most memorable moments. For serious football fans wanting to relive the most unforgettable, extraordinary, and gut-wrenching plays in Pittsburgh Steelers history, this account explores the team's greatest calls, providing context, back story, relevant circumstances, and comments from those directly involved in each play. Dozens of color photos help to reanimate each memory, including the Immaculate Reception, Willie Parker's 75-yard Super Bowl XL run from scrimmage, quarterback Mark Malone's record-setting catch of 90 yards from Terry Bradshaw, and John Henry Johnson running for a 45-yard score to help the Steelers upset the Browns. Read more...
The Trains Now Departed
The Trains Now Departed By Michael Williams

Sometimes you come across a lofty railway viaduct, marooned in the middle of a remote country landscape. Or a crumbling platform from some once-bustling junction buried under the buddleia. If you are lucky you might be able to follow some rusting tracks, or explore an old tunnel leading to. . . well, who knows where? Listen hard. Is that the wind in the undergrowth? Or the specter of a train from a golden era of the past panting up the embankment? These are the ghosts of The Trains Now Departed. They are the railway lines, and services that ran on them that have disappeared and gone forever. Our lost legacy includes lines prematurely axed, often with a gripping and colorful tale of their own, as well as marvels of locomotive engineering sent to the scrapyard, and grand termini felled by the wrecker's ball. Then there are the lost delights of train travel, such as haute cuisine in the dining car, the grand expresses with their evocative names, and continental boat trains to romantic far-off places. The Trains Now Departed tells the stories of some of the most fascinating lost trains of Britain, vividly evoking the glories of a bygone age. In his personal odyssey around Britain Michael Williams tells the tales of the pioneers who built the tracks, the yarns of the men and women who operated them, and the colorful trains that ran on them. It is a journey into the soul of our railways, summoning up a magic which, although mired in time, is fortunately not lost forever. Read more...
Storm Moon
Storm Moon By Teri Harman

A betrayal, an invasion, and a plan that has spanned centuries are all unleashed in this, the final installment of the Moonlight Trilogy. After marrying her soul mate Simon Howard, Willa Fairfield prepares for the couple's honeymoon. But, unbeknownst to her, it is not Simon who is sleeping beside her; it is Bartholomew the Dark, the legendary and dangerous witch. As Willa's mother watches the couple leave for Europe, she has the inescapable feeling that something is terribly wrong, even as she tries to convince herself that she stopped believing such signs a long time ago when she turned away from a life of magic. How can Willa fight an enemy hidden behind Simon's eyes? Can she discover the evil that resides inside him when Bartholomew has the ability to control her mind? How can she save Simon and herself before Bartholomew destroys everything? With equal dashes of horror, romance, and adventure, this is the thrilling conclusion to the Moonlight Trilogy. Read more...
Voy a comedte!
Voy a comedte! By Jean Marc Derouen

A hungry, bad wolf with poor grammar waits silently in the woods for something delicious to stroll by. With such bad luck, two bunnies hop nearby and deceive the wolf so that they can escape unscathed. While it may seem like a typical story of the big, bad wolf being chastened by innocent animals, this book’s unique typography and the wolf’s bad diction sets it apart. Read more...
The Country of Wolves
The Country of Wolves By Neil Christopher, Illustrated by Ramon Perez

Based on the acclaimed animated film of the same name, this visually stunning graphic novel takes readers on a mysterious adventure with two brothers who are lost at sea. It begins as an average hunting trip for two young men. But when they find themselves adrift at sea, the only safe haven to be found for miles—a mysterious village filled with the sounds of drum dancing and revelry—turns out to be even more dangerous than the frigid ocean. Read more...
Stories for Chip
Stories for Chip Edited by Nisi Shawl, Edited by Bill Campbell

Stories for Chip brings together outstanding authors inspired by a brilliant writer and critic, Science Fiction Writers of America Grandmaster Samuel R. "Chip" Delany. Award-winning SF luminaries such as Michael Swanwick, Nalo Hopkinson, and Eileen Gunn contribute original fiction and creative nonfiction. From surrealistic visions of bucolic road trips to erotic transgressions to mind-expanding analyses of Delany's influence on the genre—as an out gay man, an African American, and possessor of a startlingly acute intellect—this book conveys the scope of the subject's sometimes troubling, always rewarding genius. Editors Nisi Shawl and Bill Campbell have given Delany and the world at large, a gorgeous, haunting, illuminating, and deeply satisfying gift of a book. Read more...
Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen
Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen Edited by Jeff Burger

Leonard Cohen, one of the most admired performers of the last half century, has had a stranger-than-fiction, roller-coaster ride of a life. Now, for the first time, he tells his story in his own words, via more than 50 interviews conducted worldwide between 1966 and 2012. In Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen—which includes a foreword by singer Suzanne Vega and eight pages of rarely seen photos—the artist talks about “Bird on the Wire,” “Hallelujah,” and his other classic songs. He candidly discusses his famous romances, his years in a Zen monastery, his ill-fated collaboration with producer Phil Spector, his long battle with depression, and much more. You’ll find interviews that first appeared in the New York Times and Rolling Stone, but also material that has not previously been printed in English. A few have not been available until now in any format, including many illuminating reminiscences that contributors supplied specifically for this definitive anthology. Read more...
The Capacity for Infinite Happiness
The Capacity for Infinite Happiness By Alexis von Konigslow

Mathematician Emily Kogan needs to finish her thesis, and her secretive family may be just the inspiration she's looking for. She decides to conduct research into the influence of personal relationships, using her family tree as an original social network. Tracing the spiderwebs of these connections, she learns far more than she bargained for. In the 1930s, Harpo Marx joins his brothers at the Kogan's Jewish-friendly resort in Canada. Unhappy after the death of his parents and uncertain in life after the latest Marx Brothers' movie flops at the cinemas, Harpo is looking for something or someone to save. Captivated by the mysterious Ayala Kogan and her two daughters, he is drawn deeply into the lives of the Kogan family and their tragic past. Effortlessly weaving together these two storylines, Alexis von Konigslow draws the reader into an astonishing tale of ill-fated love, extraordinary courage, and a daring transatlantic escape. Read more...
First Class
First Class By Alison Stewart, Foreword by Melissa Harris-Perry

Dunbar High School in Washington, DC, defied the odds and, in the process, changed America. In the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school, despite being racially segregated by law and existing at the mercy of racist congressmen who held the school’s purse strings. These enormous challenges did not stop the local community from rallying for the cause of educating its children. Dunbar attracted an extraordinary faculty: one early principal was the first black graduate of Harvard, almost all the teachers had graduate degrees, and several earned PhDs—all extraordinary achievements given the Jim Crow laws of the times. Over the school’s first eighty years, these teachers developed generations of highly educated, high-achieving African Americans, groundbreakers that included the first black member of a presidential cabinet, the first black graduate of the US Naval Academy, the first black army general, the creator of the modern blood bank, the first black state attorney general, the legal mastermind behind school desegregation, and hundreds of educators.By the 1950s, Dunbar High School was sending 80 percent of its students to college. Today, as with too many troubled urban public schools, the majority of Dunbar students struggle with reading and math. Journalist and author Alison Stewart, whose parents were both Dunbar graduates, tells the story of the school’s rise, fall, and path toward resurgence as it looks to reopen its new, state-of-the-art campus in the fall of 2013. Read more...
I Ask You, Be Shepherds
I Ask You, Be Shepherds By Pope Francis

Pope Francis has been an engaging, prophetic voice tirelessly calling the church to a simple lifestyle of mercy, witness, and collaboration. This new volume in the Pope Francis Resource Library contains the gems from the Pope's reflections on pastoral and priestly ministry. Authorized by the Vatican, the texts are collected from Pope Francis's homilies, speeches, and papers during the first two years of his papacy, as well as from the earlier, exclusive edition published when he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires. I Ask You, Be Shepherds offers Pope Francis's profound and encouraging appeal to everyone serving God's people today. Read more...
Zombillenium, Vol. 3
Zombillenium, Vol. 3 By Arthur de Pins

There's excitement in the Zombillenium horror themed park run by actual monsters. Brought in by Behemoth himself, the vampire Bohemond Jaggar de Rochambeau IIII is officially supposed to help CEO Francis in managing the park. But the employees expect the worst: isn't he known as a cold-blooded killer? If one looks more closely, the reasons for his coming may seem less anodyne than announced. Of course, his mission is to increase return on investment for the shareholders, but for Behemoth that return has to be in souls. Francis is appalled but obligated to kowtow to the almighty consultant, determined to take power and pervert the rules of Zombillenium. Meanwhile, Aurelian goes through a bad patch. Depressed by his immortal status and the absurdity of his life... sorry, his death, he's burned out. And burnout, in a powerful demon, can be devastating. Held back in extremis by Gretchen, he avoids the worst. This is timely, because Gretchen has a plan for him... A particularly biting new episode of Zombillenium in which we discover the underbelly of the most monstrous amusement park in the world. Read more...
The Last Ship
The Last Ship By Jan Lowe Shinebourne

In a moving novel that charts the fortunes of three generations of a Chinese family in the Caribbean, Jan Lowe Shinebourne explores the power of family myth, the seductiveness of invented traditions, and the way unconscious motivations seeded in painful childhood experience can resurface in adult life. For Joan Wong, growing up in a Chinese family in the political turmoil of 1960s Guyana, family history is never straightforward. There are the examples of her grandmothers—Clarice Chung, iron-willed matriarch who has ensured the family's survival through unremitting toil, with her pride in maintaining racial and cultural identity; and Susan Leo, whose failures have shamed the family, who found comfort from harsh poverty in relationships with two Indian men and adopting an Indian life-style. Later, when Joan Wong makes her own pilgrimage to ancestral China at the turn of the 21st century, there are surprises in store. Read more...
C++ for Kids
C++ for Kids Illustrated by Tom Holmes, By Blaise Vanden-Heuvel, By John C Vanden-Heuvel Sr.

This educational and visual introduction to C++ is a great way to jump start young computer enthusiasts. Simulating the act of programming with easy-to-follow illustrations, this instructional guide makes learning C++ simple and fast for the young, eager beginner. A glossary of terms for quick reference and understanding is included. Whimsical and modern, this book is certain to inspire the new and aspiring programmer. Read more...
The Keeper
The Keeper By Darragh Martin

Ordinary books don't move. Ordinary books are quite happy waiting to be picked up. You could leave an ordinary book somewhere uncomfortable—at the bottom of a dark schoolbag or in the middle of a shop window—and it wouldn't dare budge, even if it had to sneeze. Nobody had told the Book of Magic this, though, so it jumped into Oisín's hands without so much as a flap of its pages.Oisín is not sure he wants to be Keeper of the Book of Magic—but when his little sister Sorcha is kidnapped by the Morrígan, a raven-goddess with a heart as dark as her feathers, he has to learn how to use the Book for good. Soon Oisín has a long journey ahead of him with only Stephen, his annoying older brother, and Antimony, a headstrong orphan with her own quest, to help him. Facing snow snakes, shadow fish, and mountains of wind, the three children have to decide whether or not they can trust each other—and the mysterious Book that's leading them—if they want to reach the Morrígan's Hill of Bones before it's too late to get the last ever train home. This thrilling Celtic fantasy is perfect for fans of J. K. Rowling, Eoin Colfer, and J. R. R. Tolkien. A map and a glossary are included.
The End of the World Is Rye
The End of the World Is Rye By Brett Cottrell

What would you do for the perfect sandwich? Kill? Die? Well, if you were a rogue angel, you might cause the Apocalypse. And it looks like that's just what this darkly funny fantasy's rogue angel is about to do when he lands in a polygamist cult in Utah. Now it's up to the rest of God's divine posse, including Jesus and Lucifer, to save all of existence from certain destruction. In his debut novel, Brett Cottrell takes you on a provocative, celestial roller coaster ride that will have you laughing on the edge of your seat all the way to the gates of Hell. Read more...
The Complete Muhammad Ali
The Complete Muhammad Ali By Ishmael Reed

Including material and photographs not included in most of the 100 other books about the champion, Ishmael Reed's The Complete Muhammad Ali is more than just a biography—it is a fascinating portrait of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st. An honest, balanced portrayal of Ali, the book includes voices that have been omitted from other books. It charts Ali's evolution from Black Nationalism to a universalism, but does not discount the Nation of Islam and Black Nationalism's important influence on his intellectual development. Filipino American author Emil Guillermo speaks about how "The Thrilla' In Manila" brought the Philippines into the 20th century. Fans of Muhammad Ali, boxing fans, and those interested in modern African American history and the Nation of Islam will be fascinated by this biography by an accomplished American author. Read more...
She Takes a Stand
She Takes a Stand By Michael Elsohn Ross

Portraits of brave women from the late 1800s through today—role models who are passionate about important issues. A source of inspiration for young women with strong social convictions, She Takes a Stand highlights 16 extraordinary women who have fought for human rights, civil rights, workers' rights, reproductive/sexual rights, and world peace. Among these are many who have been imprisoned, threatened, or suffered financial hardships for pursuing their missions to change the world for the better. Included are historic heroes such as anti-lynching crusader Ida B. Wells and suffragist Alice Paul, along with contemporary figures such as girls-education activist Malala Yousafzai; Sampat Pal Devi, who fights violence against Indian women; and SPARK executive director Dana Edell, who works to end the sexualization of women and girls in the media. Taking a multicultural, multinational perspective, She Takes a Stand spotlights brave women around the world with an emphasis on childhood details, motivations, and life turning points—in many cases gleaned from the author's original interviews—and includes related sidebars, a bibliography, source notes, and a list of organizations young women can explore to get involved in changing their world. Read more...
Magna Carta in 20 Places
Magna Carta in 20 Places By Derek J. Taylor

The only book to tell Magna Carta's story through places associated with it, through England and France to the United States. The Magna Carta has undergone an extraordinary journey from the palaces and villages of England, through the castles and towns of France, via the Middle East, and ending in the United States today. Along the way, the book dispels the popular notions that King John was an unredeemed tyrant, the baron's champions of civil liberty, and that Magna Carta was the foundation of democracy and universal freedom. The true story is much more intriguing than a simple fiction of good defeating evil, and the author tries to answer one of the great mysteries about the Charter: why today is it much more enthusiastically revered in America than it is in the country of its origin? But myths can be powerful. And the account of how this largely technical medieval document became an inspiration to those who have struggled over centuries to win democracy and freedom under the law reveals a great deal about our need for symbols and our inclination to believe what we want to believe. Read more...
Ziggyology
Ziggyology By Simon Goddard

From the author of the acclaimed Mozipedia, a work of supreme pop archaeology unearths every influence that brought Ziggy to life, from H. G. Wells to Holst, Kabuki to Kubrick, and Elvis to Iggy. The most ambitious and important book on Ziggy Stardust ever written, this study documents the epic drama of the Starman's short but eventful time on Planet Earth, and why Bowie eventually had to kill him. It was the greatest invention in the history of pop music—the rock god who came from the stars—which struck a young David Bowie like a lightning bolt from the heavens. When Ziggy the glam alien messiah fell to Earth, he transformed Bowie from a prodigy to a superstar who changed the face of music forever. But who was Ziggy Stardust? And where did he really come from? Beautifully packaged, this will be a must-have artifact for Bowie fans. Read more...
French Riviera and Its Artists
French Riviera and Its Artists By John Baxter

Get swept up in the glitz and glamour of the French Riviera as author and filmmaker John Baxter takes readers on a whirlwind tour through the star-studded cultural history of the Côte d'Azur that's sure to delight travelers, Francophiles, and culture lovers alike. Readers will discover the dramatic lives of the legendary artists, writers, actors, and politicians who frequented the world's most luxurious resort during its golden age. In 25 vivid chapters, Baxter introduces the iconic figures indelibly linked to the South of France—artist Henri Matisse, who lived in Nice for much of his life; F. Scott Fitzgerald, whose Riviera hosts inspired his controversial Tender is the Night; Coco Chanel, who made the Saint-Tropez tan an international fashion statement; and many more. Along the way, Baxter takes readers where few people ever get to go: the alluring world of the perfume industry, into the cars and casinos of Monte Carlo, behind-the-scenes at the Cannes Film Festival, to the villa where Picasso and Cocteau smoked opium, and to the hotel where Joseph Kennedy had an affair with Marlene Dietrich. Then maps and listings show travelers how these luminaries celebrated life and made art amid paradise. Read more...
Dream of Venice
Dream of Venice Photographs By Charles Christopher, Edited by JoAnn Locktov, Foreword by Frances Mayes

The mysterious allure of the ancient floating city of Venice is captured in this book of evocative photography and beguiling words of a diverse group of contemporary Venetophiles. The luminous photographs, in both color and black and white, compliment the intimate thoughts, memories, poems, and stories of notable contributors from the worlds of art, literature, design, cuisine, music, and filmmaking. Readers will want to listen to the silence of the canals and get lost in the ethereal mist of Piazza San Marco. Included are anecdotes and Venetian recollections from Woody Allen, Julie Christie, Diane Hales, Marcella Hazan, Erica Jong, Judith Martin, Linus Roache, and Nicolas Roeg. Read more...
The Mickey Mantle Murder
The Mickey Mantle Murder By Walt Brown

The 1952 Mickey Mantle baseball card is a treasured artifact: the iconic card, depending on condition, can sell for up to half a million dollars. In The Mickey Mantle Murder, the card is the centerpiece of an international geopolitical murder. The novel details the investigation into the theft of the card and the disappearance of "Pete Rizzoli," a well-known, flamboyant, and frequently abrasive sports collectible dealer whose worth is in the tens of millions. How did Rizzoli go missing? Who was clever enough to make his disappearance succeed? What unknown protocols did the criminals use to succeed in their endeavor? This unique murder mystery, set in the world of sports memorabilia collecting, features an earthy detective out to solve the case. Read more...
Exhilarating Prose
Exhilarating Prose By Barry Healey, By Cordelia Strube

This smartly illustrated literary miscellanea is intended to stimulate readers and writers of English prose. From "dead language – the speaks" (i.e., ad-speak, media-speak, corporate-speak) through "re-writing – Again?" to rules (to obey or not to obey), authors Barry Healey and Cordelia Strube examine what makes good and bad writing. With tongue often in cheek, they scrutinize various forms of prose and the seven major prose elements, and reflect on how to approach the writing process most effectively. Exhilarating Prose also abounds with examples of startling writing, wide-ranging quotes from celebrated authors, and their own ruminations on the oddities of writing and the infinite eccentricity of the human mind. To those interested in English words "in their best order" (Coleridge), this book will inform, engage, and amuse. Read more...
Very British Problems
Very British Problems By Rob Temple

There's an epidemic sweeping the nation Symptoms include: Acute embarrassment at the mere notion of 'making a fuss,' Extreme awkwardness when faced with any social greeting beyond a brisk handshake, An unhealthy preoccupation with meteorology. Doctors have also reported several cases of unnecessary apologising, an obsessive interest in correct queuing etiquette and dramatic sighing in the presence of loud teenagers on public transport. If you have experienced any of these symptoms, you may be suffering from VERY BRITISH PROBLEMS. VERY BRITISH PROBLEMS are highly contagious. There is no known cure. Rob Temple's hilarious new book reveals all the ways in which we are a nation of socially awkward but well-meaning oddballs, struggling to make it through every day without apologising to an inanimate object. Take comfort in misfortunes of others. You are not alone. Read more...
Exploring the Titanic
Exploring the Titanic By Robert D. Ballard

A century after the great ship sank to the ocean floor, the Titanic still captivates the imagination. More than just a collection of the superlative facts associated with the ship —largest, tallest, fastest—Robert Ballard's Exploring the Titanic tells the tale of the doomed ocean liner through the eyes of those who lived the tragedy and those who discovered the ship 74 years later. The book is brought to life with dozens of engaging illustrations by renowned artist Ken Marschall. Read more...
The Hermione
The Hermione By Emmanuel de Fontainieu, Foreword by Henry Kissinger, Introduction by Ségolène Royal

Enhanced by illustrations, maps, and letters this book provides a museum quality experience with detailed descriptions of the thrilling accomplishments of Lafayette and his legendary warship in support of the colonists' cause during the American Revolutionary War, with fascinating insights into the building of the arsenal in Rochefort under Louis XIV and Colbert, development of the French navy, eighteenth-century naval strategy, and shipbuilding techniques. Lafayette, on a secret mission from King Louis XVI, was to inform George Washington and the Congress that France would support the American colonies in their conflict with Great Britain. Once on American soil, Lafayette shed his diplomatic role for an important military assignment, helping to mastermind the decisive Virginia campaign that brought hostilities to an end. While Lafayette excelled on the battlefield, his ship, L'Hermione, was burnishing its own legend as part of the crucial maneuvers that led to the defeat of the much larger British navy and ensured the American victory. Also profiled is the ambitious undertaking of the nearly two decades long project to meticulously re-create L'Hermione and prepare it for a new transatlantic voyage, again on a mission of friendship and goodwill. Read more...
Pickles Preserves and Cures
Pickles Preserves and Cures By Thane Prince

Many cooks remember jams and chutneys made by grandmothers and great aunts who also seemed to know exactly how long to boil a ham and how to keep butter, and who had a magical pantry full of secret delights. These skills are increasingly in demand as more people want to make use of homegrown produce, reduce the weekly food budget, or rediscover cooking from scratch. A timely book for the new kitchen revolution, this is not only a celebration of lost skills such as curing, rendering, and pickling and a collection of fantastic recipes (such as Roasted Brine-cured Pork, Green Tomato Chutney, and Salted Peanut Brittle), but also provides advice on stocking a pantry and the best way to store cheese, cooked meats, and vegetables. At a time when everyone is looking to shop more locally, cook thriftily, and still enjoy great food, it is a book for how to live today. Recipes include dual measurements. Read more...
The Insatiable Maw
The Insatiable Maw By Mick Lowe

In this story of eco-resistance based on actual events in the heart of Canada's Nickel Range, Jake McCool, the injured hardrock miner, returns to work for the International Nickel Company (INCO) but now at its nearby Copper Cliff smelter complex. In no time, Jake finds himself embroiled in a vicious fight over health and safety and, more specifically, over the extreme levels of sulphur dioxide that poison the air in the smelter but also in the entire surrounding area. The fight takes on new dimensions as freelance reporter Foley Gilpin sparks interest at Canada's national daily Globe & Mail and as local parliamentarian Harry Wardell smells the collusion between INCO and the highest levels of Ministry of Natural Resources at Queen's Park in Toronto. Read more...
Thin Blue Smoke
Thin Blue Smoke By Doug Worgul

This title is an epic American redemption tale about love and loss, hope and despair, God and whiskey, barbecue and the blues. LaVerne Williams is a ruined ex-big league ballplayer, an ex-felon with an attitude problem, and the owner of a barbecue joint he has to run. Ferguson Glen is an Episcopal priest, a fading literary star with a drinking problem, and a past he is running from. A.B. Clayton and Sammy Merzeti are two lost souls in need of love, understanding, and another cigarette. Hilarious and heart-rending, sacred and profane, this book marks the emergence of a vital new voice in American fiction. Read more...
In the All-Night Café
In the All-Night Café By Stuart David

Determined to make his living writing stories and songs, Stuart had spent several years scraping by on the dole in his small, industrial hometown. Then he had the fateful idea to learn bass guitar, and to head for Glasgow in search of likeminded artists. In the All-Night Café describes his fortuitous meeting with the group's cofounder Stuart Murdoch in a course for unemployed musicians. It tells of their adventures in two early incarnations of Belle and Sebastian and culminates in the recordingof their celebrated debut album, Tigermilk. This portrait of the group and its origins will resonate with anyone who has put together—or thought of putting together—a band. It is a story of a group of friends who wanted to create a different kind of music, and how—against all expectations—they succeeded. Written with wit, affection, and a novelist's observant eye, In the All-Night Café brings to life the early days of this most enigmatic and intriguing of bands. Read more...
The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm
The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm By LeVar Burton, By Susan Schaefer Bernardo, Illustrated by Courtenay Fletcher

This week in 1983, the very first episode of Reading Rainbow, hosted by LeVar Burton, aired on television. Read more on the Reading Rainbow Blog.
How to Chat Someone Up at a Funeral
How to Chat Someone Up at a Funeral By Mark Leigh

Most etiquette guides will tell you the proper way to eat asparagus or the correct way to address a dignitary—but they fail abysmally when it comes to offering advice on any number of awkward social situations. Containing guidance and tips for dealing with more than 60 such scenarios, this book is completely non-judgemental. How (and why) you might find yourself in any of these circumstances is immaterial; the book is concerned with presenting the best way to conduct yourself so you leave the situation with your dignity (and sometimes your life) intact. Modern dilemmas covered include challenging a co-worker to a duel, disposing of a dead body, assuming someone's pregnant when they are not, inadvertently farting in the presence of the Queen of England, and disarming an axe-wielding maniac. Read more...
Giant Splash
Giant Splash By Andrew Baggarly

Since the team moved to the shores of McCovey Cove in 2000, Giants fans have been thrilled by iconic players, historic moments, and heroic performances—not to mention three World Series championships. Giant Splash takes readers onto the field and inside the clubhouse for every unforgettable moment: Barry Bonds' record-setting home runs, Tim Lincecum's no-hitter, Matt Cain's perfect game, Travis Ishikawa's walk-off pennant winner, and many more. Read more...
Fallen Angels
Fallen Angels By Jack Vettriano, Edited by W. Gordon Smith

Painter Jack Vettriano emerged from the unlikely background of the Scottish coalfields, unknown and untutored, and has seen his canvases hung in the Royal Scottish Academy, eventually becoming Scotland's most successful and controversial contemporary artist, his painting The Singing Butler selling for close to $1.2 million. This collection presents, alongside more than 40 Jack Vettriano paintings, stories, poems, dialogue from plays, and other fine examples of Scottish writing. W. Gordon Smith, playwright and art critic, has woven an anthology of new and old writing around the painter's images, complementing them, matching their moods, and extending the lives of his characters beyond their frozen moments on canvas. Some of Scotland's most accomplished writers have accepted the challenge to put their imagination into free fall and, by interpreting Vettriano's paintings in such diverse ways, plunder some of their mysteries and perhaps go some way towards explaining their unique appeal. Read more...
Style Is Eternal
Style Is Eternal By Nicole Jenkins

Answering the question, "How can I have so many clothes, yet still have nothing to wear?" Style Is Eternal provides you with the tools to transform your wardrobe from faddish to stylish. Nicole Jenkins shares her experience as a fashion buyer and stylist to navigate the essential additions to your wardrobe without breaking the bank, use accessories to create new outfits, convert your fashion faux pas into chic statements, and travel with only hand luggage and still look classy. Nicole reveals her tricks of the trade: how to make the most of your body shape, how to create an authentic look, when to combine classic staples with more contemporary fashionable pieces, how to avoid those regrettable and expensive impulse buys, how to have a wardrobe that will cover all your work and lifestyle options, and practical tips on caring for your clothes. Style Is Eternal is a beautiful step-by-step guide to understand and integrate fashion basics, classics, and trends into a personalized signature look. It will encourage dressing with confidence and creativity. Read more...
How I Rescued My Brain
How I Rescued My Brain By David Roland

As a forensic psychologist, David Roland often saw the toughest, most heartbreaking cases. The emotional trauma had begun to take its toll, and then the global financial crisis hit, leaving his family facing financial ruin. When he found himself in an emergency ward with little idea of how he got there, doctors wondered if he'd had a nervous breakdown. Eventually they discovered the truth: David had suffered a stroke, which had resulted in brain injury. He faced two choices: give up or get his brain working again. Drawing on the principles of neuroplasticity, David set about rewiring his brain. He embarked on a search that brought him into contact with doctors, neuroscientists, yoga teachers, musicians, and a Buddhist nun, and found the tools to restore his sense of self through psychotherapy, swimming, music, mindfulness, and meditation. This is the story of David's neurological difficulties and of his remarkable cognitive recovery. It is also an account of a journey to emotional health. How I Rescued My Brain is an amazing tale of one man's resilience and his determination to overcome one of the most frightening situations imaginable—the fear that he had lost his mind and might not get it back. Read more...
Protecting Others
Protecting Others By Jim Wagner

Addressing simple yet powerfully effective methods of self-defense, this guide teaches how to best deal with dangerous situations. With detailed photo sequences, helpful captions, and clear illustrations that depict the proper way to do drills, it uses a variety of scenarios, such as home invasion, street crime, terrorism, bank robberies, and even grenade attack, to show the best ways to keep loved ones and other third parties safe while defusing the situation as quickly and peacefully as possible. With chapters that discuss victim rescue, vehicle security, bodyguard basics, and how to survive a variety of weapon attacks, this is the authoritative self-defense manual for everyone from the professional soldier to the civilian. Read more...
The Hard Sell
The Hard Sell By Dee Madigan

What is unique about political advertising? Is it really all that effective in changing votes? Why does it have to be so annoying? In The Hard Sell, creative director Dee Madigan uses her trademark humor and down-to-earth approach to unveil the world of political advertising. Drawing on real-life stories from her own recent federal and state campaigns in Australia, she gives fascinating industry insight into how political ads are designed to work; who they are meant to influence; how they are paid for; why so many negative ads are made; how personal is too personal; how spin works, particularly in an election campaigns; how to make messages cut through cynicism; how politicians use journalists; and the gendered nature of it all. The author is candid about the tricks of the trade and the lessons that can be learned. Read more...
Rebel Priest in the Time of Tyrants
Rebel Priest in the Time of Tyrants By Claude Lacaille, Foreword by Miguel d'Escoto, M. M., Translated by Casey Roberts

Claude Lacaille witnessed up close the oppression and poverty in Haiti, Ecuador, and Chile where dictators and predatory imperialists ruled. Like other advocates of Liberation Theology, he saw it as his duty to join the resistance, particularly against Chilean military dictator Augusto Pinochet. But the dictators were not alone, as they often enjoyed the support of the Vatican, sometimes tacit, but then brazenly open under Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI. He began writing this book in Chile where thousands shed blood simply because they defended victims of dictatorship, opposed rapacious policies and economic doctrines, consoled the downtrodden, and breathed new hope and courage into a people who desperately needed it. These men and women remain an inspiration for those who still believe in a better world. This is the story of Claude Lacaille's experience from 1965 through 1986 in the slums and squats in the Caribbean and South America and also what it really means to have a preferential option for the poor. His book shows how liberation theology and spirituality enkindled the life and the work of an ordinary Quebec missionary. Read more...
2016 Nantucket Calendar
2016 Nantucket Calendar Photographs By Charles Fields

Breathtaking and beautiful, this 12-month calendar is designed with awe-inspiring, professionally photographed landscapes of the picturesque island of Nantucket. Marked with all major holidays and moon phases, this essential tool has ample room to note appointments, meetings, and special events. Capturing the exceptional core of an island whose population swells to nearly five times its size in the summer months, this calendar makes a handsome addition to the walls of island dwellers and visitors alike. Read more...
Mob Cop
Mob Cop By Fred Pascente, By Sam Reaves

Former Chicago police officer and Outfit associate Fred Pascente is the man who links Tony Spilotro, a central character in Nicholas Pileggi's Casino and one of Chicago's most notori­ous mob figures, to William Hanhardt, chief of detectives of the Chicago Police Department. Pascente and Spilotro grew up together on Chicago's Near West Side, and as young toughs they were rousted and shaken down by Hanhardt. While Spilotro became one of the youngest made men in Chicago Outfit history, Pascente was draft­ed into the army and then joined the police department. Soon taken under Hanhardt's wing, Pascente served as Hanhardt's fixer and bagman on the department for more than a decade. At the same time, Pascente remained close to Spilotro, mak­ing frequent trips to Las Vegas to party with his old friend while helping to rob the casinos blind. As a policeman he led a double life, doing genuine police work un­der Hanhardt's tutelage while at the same time keeping an eye out for opportunities for bribery and theft. His position on both sides of the law gave him unrivaled knowl­edge of the workings of Chicago's deeply rooted culture of corruption. Mob Cop details the decline of tra­ditional organized crime in the United States, and reveals information about the inner workings of the Outfit that has never been publicly released. Fred Pascente's col­orful stories of crooked cops and danger­ous criminals make his memoir a matchless tell-all. Read more...
Big Top Burning
Big Top Burning By Laura A. Woollett

Thousands of men, women, and children were crowded under Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey's big top watching the Flying Wallendas begin their death-defying high-wire act. Suddenly someone screamed "Fire!" and the panic began. By 2:50 the tent had burned to the ground. Not everyone had made it out alive. With primary source documents and survivor interviews, Big Top Burning recounts the true story of the 1944 Hartford circus fire—one of the worst fire disasters in U.S. history. Its remarkable characters include Robert Segee, a 15-year-old circus roustabout and known pyromaniac, and the Cook children, Donald, Eleanor, and Edward, who were in the audience when the circus tent caught fire. Guiding readers through the investigations of the mysteries that make this moment in history so fascinating, this book asks: Was the unidentified body of a little girl nicknamed "Little Miss 1565" Eleanor Cook? Was the fire itself an act of arson—and did Robert Segee set it? Big Top Burning combines a gripping disaster story, an ongoing detective and forensics saga, and World War II–era American history, inviting middle-grades readers to take part in a critical evaluation of the evidence and draw their own conclusions. Read more...
Jennifer's Journal
Jennifer's Journal By Jennifer Crute

By turns funny, poignant, melancholic, and life-affirming, Jennifer's Journal: The Life of a SubUrban Girl is a graphic memoir that chronicles the life of a quirky, petite, freckled-faced African American illustrator and artist. The journal depicts Jennifer's struggles with work, depression, sex and sexuality, and religion while poking fun at the stereotypes she encounters along the way. Featuring a host of colorful characters—from grumpy family members to gossipy schoolmates to New York City archetypes like the nosy neighbor or the guy selling raw oxtails at the Laundromat—it is an entertaining and humorous look at life with awkward insights from Jennifer's close friends as well as from her imaginary companions: the meditative Miss Buddha Bear, her nemesis Mean Mama, and the rest of her tyrannical friends. Each of these characters shape Jennifer's ability to maintain peace of mind while battling the insane stereotypes around race, class, and gender contained in mainstream and popular culture. It's a story that will resonate with anyone who grew up feeling like an outsider. Read more...
100 Things Avengers Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die
100 Things Avengers Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die By Dan Casey

With extensive backstories and comic lore, this lively, detailed book explores the characters, storylines, and facts every Avengers fan should know. This guide covers the history of how the group went from Justice League knockoff to billion-dollar franchise; the history of Ultron, Thanos, and the Infinity Gauntlet; and the series' seminal storylines, writers, and artists. It includes information on everyone's favorite Avengers, including Iron Man, Thor, Hulk, Captain America, Hawkeye, and Black Widow, as well as members of the Secret Avengers and the New Avengers. Author Daniel Casey has collected every essential piece of Avengers knowledge and trivia, including why the Avengers went out for shawarma, as well as must-do activities, such as how to make the most of your Comic-Con experience and how to properly preserve your comic book collection, and ranks them all, providing an entertaining and easy-to-follow checklist for fans of all ages. Read more...
Harold and Maude
Harold and Maude By Colin Higgins

Nineteen-year-old Harold Chasen is obsessed with death. He fakes suicides to shock his self-obsessed mother, drives a hearse, and attends funerals of complete strangers. Seventy-nine-year-old Maude Chardin, on the other hand, adores life. She liberates trees from city sidewalks and transplants them to the forest, paints smiles on the faces of church statues, and "borrows" cars to remind their owners that life is fleeting—here today, gone tomorrow! A chance meeting between the two turns into a madcap, whirlwind romance, and Harold learns that life is worth living, and how to play the banjo. Harold and Maude started as Colin Higgins's master's thesis at UCLA film school before being made into the 1971 film directed by Hal Ashby. The quirky, dark comedy gained a loyal cult following, and in 1997 it was selected for inclusion on the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress. Higgins's novelization was released with the original film but has been out of print for more than thirty years. Fans who have seen the movie dozens of times will find this a valuable companion, as it gives fresh elements to watch for and answers many of the film's unresolved questions. Read more...
By Trolley Past Thimbledon Bridge
By Trolley Past Thimbledon Bridge By Ashley Bryan, Illustrated by Marvin Bileck

This picture book takes children of all ages on a trolley-ride dream adventure. Featuring the extraordinary illustrations of Caldecott Honoree, Marvin Bileck, this book is a dream caught on paper with the sense of magic and wonder and unfettered imagination of a child. As sleep starts the journey into the blue, marvelous threads unravel dreamy images out of the blue revealing animals, far-off places, a circus, games, toys, wind, rain, a touch of this and a touch of that, words and wordplay. A poem accompanies the whimsical illustrations, perfectly capturing the sense of awe and excitement of childhood. With the eyes of a child, or simply the heart of a child, this book invites you into a dream world, an allegory, a journey. Read more...

Bowie on Bowie
Bowie on Bowie Edited by Sean Egan

Bowie on Bowie presents some of the best interviews David Bowie has granted in his near five-decade career. Each featured interview traces a new step in his unique journey, successively freezing him in time in all of his various incarnations, from a young novelty hit-maker and Ziggy Stardust to plastic soul player, 1980s sell-out, and the artistically reborn and beloved elder statesman of challenging popular music. In all of these iterations he is remarkably articulate and also preternaturally polite as almost every interviewer remarks upon his charm. The features in this book come from outlets both prestigious—Melody Maker, MOJO, New Musical Express, Q, Rolling Stone—and less well-known—the Drummer, Guitar, Ikon, Mr. Showbiz—but no matter the renown of the magazine, newspaper, or website, Bowie lets us approach the nerve center of his notoriously creative output. Read more...

Book of Tripe
Book of Tripe By Stephane Reynaud, Photographs By Marie-Pierre Morel, Illustrated by José Reis de Matos

The highly acclaimed author of French Feasts and Pork & Sons explains what to do with gizzards, kidneys, feet, brains, tails, and all the restFrom much-loved chef Stéphane Reynaud comes an extensive collection of nose to tail recipes combining responsible eating with delicious cuisine. Stéphane's recipes showcase everything from traditional dishes to more modern fare including Chicken Liver Soufflés, Pig Trotter and Dandelion Salad, Lamb's Liver and Caramelised Apples, Sweetbreads with Cream, Pan-fried Duck Hearts with Ginger, Peppered Brain Fritters, and Curried Pork Cheeks among many others. This charmingly presented book will allay your prejudices and give you the perfect introduction to the world of tripe. Recipes include dual measurements. Read more...

Atlanta: Then and Now®
Atlanta: Then and Now® By Michael Rose

Archive images from Atlanta's early days, when it was known as the "Gate City," are paired with the same view today, as the bustling capital of the New SouthAtlanta blends the old-Southern charm and hospitality of its history with the energy of the modern millennial city. Staked out in the 1837 wilderness of northeast Georgia, the site that became Atlanta was identified as the termination point for the as-yet unbuilt railroad line. Since that time, transportation has been key to the city's growth, from its declaration as the Gate City of the South in 1857, its prominence as a distribution center during the Civil War, to its current designation as home of the nation's busiest airport. At the end of the 19th century, Atlanta presented itself to the world in a grand international exposition; it closed the next century by bringing the world to Atlanta as it hosted the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Throughout this drive from rural terminal to urban metropolis, Atlanta has witnessed incredible growth. The scenes in this book document this change as the city's tree-lined avenues and country crossroads gave way to high-rises, busy city intersections, and community growth. Atlanta: Then and Now is a captivating chronicle of history and change since the dawn of the camera age. It pairs historic photographs, many more than a century old, with specially commissioned views of the same scene as it exists today to show the evolution of Atlanta from its early years to the very different city that it is today. Sites include: Ellis, Hunter, Alabama, Marietta, Peachtree and Decatur Streets, Train Gulch, Cabbage Town, Inman Park, Georgian Terrace, Terminal Station, The Castle, and Margaret Mitchell Square Read more...
Arctic Crime and Punishment
Arctic Crime and Punishment By Kenn Harper

In this latest edition in the In Those Days: Collected Writings on Arctic History series, Kenn Harper shares the tales of murderers, thieves, and fraudsters, as well as the wrongfully accused, in the early days of Northern colonization. In the 19th and 20th centuries, settler and Inuit ideas of justice clashed, leading to some of the most unusual trials and punishments in history. Included in this collection are the stories of criminals and victims, both southern and Inuit, and of the difficulties of finding justice in a land that was rapidly changing. Read more...

Code Name Pauline
Code Name Pauline By Pearl Witherington Cornioley, Edited by Kathryn Atwood

There was a full moon on the evening of September 22, 1943, when Pearl Witherington, age 29, parachuted into France to aid the French Resistance as a special agent for the British Special Operations Executive (SOE). Out of the 400 agents sent to France during the German occupation, 39 were women. Pearl, whom the SOE called "cool and resourceful and extremely determined" and "the best shot, male or female, we have yet had," became one of the most celebrated female World War II resistance fighters.In Code Name Pauline Pearl describes in a series of plainspoken reminiscences her difficult childhood and harrowing escape from France in 1940; her recruitment and training as a special agent; the logistics and dangers of posing as a cosmetics saleswoman to make her way around the country as an undercover courier; and both failed and successful attempts at sabotaging the Nazis. She tells how, when the leader of her network was caught by the Gestapo, she became "Pauline" and rose to command a 3,500-strong band of French Resistance fighters. With an annotated list of key figures, an appendix of original unedited interview extracts—including Pearl's husband Henri's story—and never-before-published photographs from Pearl's personal collection, Code Name Pauline will captivate World War II buffs of any age and, just as Pearl wished, inspire young people. Read more...
Playing as if the World Mattered
Playing as if the World Mattered By Gabriel Kuhn

The world of sports is often associated with commercialism, corruption, and reckless competition. Liberals have objected to sport being used for political propaganda, and leftists have decried its role in distracting the masses from the class struggle. Yet, since the beginning of organized sports, athletes, fans, and officials have tried to administer and play it in ways that strengthen, rather than hinder, progressive social change. From the workers' sports movement in the early 20th century to the civil rights struggle transforming sports in the 1960s to the current global network of grassroots sports clubs, there has been a glowing desire to include sports in the struggle for liberation and social justice. With the help of numerous full-color illustrations—from posters and leaflets to paintings and photographs—Playing as if the World Mattered makes this history tangible and introduces an understanding of sports beyond chauvinistic jingoism, corporate-media chat rooms, and multibillion-dollar business deals. Read more...
Ghetto Brother
Ghetto Brother By Julian Voloj, Illustrated by Claudia Ahlering, Introduction by Jeff Chang

An engrossing and counter view of one of the most dangerous elements of American urban history, this graphic novel tells the true story of Benjy Melendez, a Bronx legend, son of Puerto-Rican immigrants, who founded, at the end of the 1960s, the notorious Ghetto Brothers gang. From the seemingly bombed-out ravages of his neighborhood, wracked by drugs, poverty, and violence, he managed to extract an incredibly positive energy from this riot ridden era: his multiracial gang promoted peace rather than violence. After initiating a gang truce, the Ghetto Brothers held weekly concerts on the streets or in abandoned buildings, which fostered the emergence of hip-hop. Melendez also began to reclaim his Jewish roots after learning about his family's dramatic crypto-Jewish background. Read more...
Hoodwinked!
Hoodwinked! By Kanbar Entertainment

The classic tale of Little Red Riding Hood gets a modern twist and turns into a wild-and-crazy detective story in this CGI animated family film and book. When The Big Bad Wolf breaks into Granny's house and accosts Red, the Woodsman attempts to save the little girl. Once the investigation starts, we get two very different stories about what happened. What was once a simple domestic disturbance case quickly unravels into a conspiracy of vast proportions. As the laugh-filled tale unfolds, we learn that the truth isn't always what it seems, and even the most guilty-seeming creatures can sometimes be the most innocent. Read more...
A Sorcerer's Apprentice
A Sorcerer's Apprentice By John Herlosky

Follow the fascinating story of one man's journey into the realm of the fantastic: the CIA-sponsored psychic spies with the ability to extend their consciousness to accurately describe targets not only half a world away but to look into the future as well. It all sounded like science fiction to John Herlosky after reading an expose by former member of the CIA's Project Stargate, Dr. David Morehouse. Two years later, skeptical but intrigued by the possibilities implied, John entered the classroom of Dr. Morehouse to find out the truth—and never looked back. Sorcerer's Apprentice is an autobiographical account of the author's experience learning the CIA-sponsored scientifically validated form of extrasensory perception called "remote viewing." The book chronicles the author's journey from interested skeptic to operational remote viewer working his first mission as well as his former life as a police officer and private military contractor. He takes you on a journey from the crushing depths and pathos of the wreck of the Titanic to the fate of a downed pilot missing for 19 years from the first Gulf War. Witness the personal turmoil as the author's long-held beliefs clash with the powerful implications of his experiences. Read more...
Barry Louis Polisar's a Little Different
Barry Louis Polisar's a Little Different By Barry Polisar

Children will be delighted by the wry, sly, and witty lyrics of Barry Louis Polisar. This recording includes 17 songs with musical homages to Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, the Native American a capella group Ulali, and other artists. It features 45 minutes of songs such as a blues version of “I’m a Slug,” a joyful song called “Potty Training,” and the song “Homemade Band,” in which Barry uses everyday kitchen utensils as instruments. He is joined by Ray Tilkens and his various instruments, which give this recording a textured and original sound. Read more...
Strangers in the Bronx
Strangers in the Bronx By Andrew O'Toole, Foreword by Marty Appel

Rare is the athlete who captures the imagination of a generation. In Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle, sports culture had two such figures. Undoubtedly, DiMaggio and Mantle are two of the most revered names in baseball literature. However, there is one particular moment that has been overlooked by baseball historians and writers: the 1951 pennant-winning New York Yankees team—DiMaggio's last year and Mantle's rookie season. For that one year, the paths of these two baseball icons converged, the naissance of Mantle's career poignantly juxtaposed with the slow descent of DiMaggio's final season. Strangers in the Bronx is more than a chronicle of a World Series–winning team, it is also a study of heroes: the decline of an all-too mortal American icon and the emergence of the newest sensation in sport. Read more...
Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant
Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant By Scott Barnett

Written in a cinematic style, this book is about the creation, growth, and sale of the Bubba Gump Shrimp Company. The concept began when Paramount Pictures reached out to see if there was interest in creating a restaurant based on the movie Forrest Gump. It is also the personal story of the author's growth as a CEO and creator of restaurant concepts. A host of situations are described such as restaurant concept creation, high stakes boardroom confrontations, and escaping corrupt officials in foreign lands. The narrative is partly an unvarnished peak behind the everyday scenes of restaurants, movie studios, and Wall Street. There is also an almost step-by-step recounting of how the Bubba Gump concept and others were created and operated. Lessons can be learned on unorthodox methods used in moving from traditional approaches to untried ways of doing business. Read more...
A Delicate Affair on the Western Front
A Delicate Affair on the Western Front By Terrence J. Finnegan

Could the newly arrived American troops be trusted? They were greenhorns, having seen practically no action. The surprise attack at Seicheprey on April 20 was spearheaded by the elite German stormtroopers (Stosstruppen) supported by aircraft, trench mortars, and heavy artillery and was designed as a propaganda coup against the "weak" newcomers. On the edge of the well-named Forêt de Mort Homme, the Connecticut boys of the 102nd regiment bore the brunt. The Americans fell back in disarray in a hell of hand-to-hand fighting; one U.S. cook killed two Germans with his meat cleaver. "A delicate affair" is an actual label applied by one U.S. command report after the battle—and it was an affair with significance beyond its outcome, as the first engagement between U.S. and German forces. Relying entirely on primary sources throughout, the author uses the battle as a jumping-off point to describe how all battles developed in the war, through intelligence (or lack of it) and minute-by-minute command decisions. Read More...
101 Outstanding Graphic Novels
101 Outstanding Graphic Novels By Stephen Weiner, Edited by Daniel J. Fingeroth, Introduction by Ellen Forney

The popular primer on the best graphic novels, initially called The 101 Best Graphic Novels, is back in its third updated edition. Expert librarian Stephen Weiner—with the crowdsourcing help of professionals in the field, from artists to critics to leading comic store owners—has sifted through the bewildering thousands of graphic novels now available to come up with an outstanding, not-to-be-missed 101. With an all-encompassing variety of genres, including both fiction and nonfiction, this serves as a great introduction to this increasingly influential world of pop culture and entertainment while also serving as a reference list for fans on what they may have possibly overlooked. Read More...
Interval
Interval By Alice B. Fogel

In this series of poems responding to Johann Sebastian Bach's spectacular "Goldberg Variations," New Hampshire State Poet Laureate Alice B. Fogel has paid homage to a 274-year-old masterpiece and, with the theme of spirit and embodiment that music—and life itself—evoke, has rendered from it a luminous new interpretation. Bach created the Goldbergs' 32 sections using nearly all the styles of western European music at the time; Fogel responds in kind with a range of contemporary poetic styles, including narrative, lyric, and experimental, all confined within the 32-line structure she has borrowed from the composer's 32-bar format. Interval mimics the "baroque" effects of overlapping melodies and harmonies by layering sound, syntax, and sense in multiple voices exploring self, identity, and being. In capturing the essence of this iconic masterpiece, through these poems Fogel has created her own music. Read more...
Tommy Lasorda
Tommy Lasorda By Colin Gunderson, Foreword by Joe Torre

Tommy Lasorda believed that winning wasn't about being the best, but about believing you are the best and that philosophy runs throughout Tommy Lasorda: My Way. Author Colin Gunderson takes readers through Lasorda's days as a player and the manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, including their two World Series Championships in 1981 and 1988. In this book, fans will recall some of their favorite Lasorda anecdotes, and will also be privy to new information and rich background on this national baseball treasure, including memories from an All-Star roster of Dodgers stars.
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life By Marshall B. Rosenberg, Foreword by Arun Gandhi

Do you hunger for skills to improve the quality of your relationships, to deepen your sense of personal empowerment or to simply communicate more effectively? Nonviolent Communication partners practical skills with a powerful consciousness and vocabulary to help you get what you want peacefully. In this internationally acclaimed text, Marshall Rosenberg offers insightful stories, anecdotes, practical exercises and role-plays that will dramatically change your approach to communication for the better.
What the Mystics Know
What the Mystics Know By Richard Rohr

Drawing from the best and most poetic of Richard Rohr's essays from nearly a quarter of a century, each chapter in this new collection examines one of the seven core mystical truths.
PUMPED
PUMPED By The Boston Globe

This ultimate comeback story is recounted in PUMPED, produced by the Boston Globe, which has chronicled the team's fortunes for New England sports fans since the team's inception, and never more thoroughly than in 2014. This 128-page book captures, game-by-game in insightful words and riveting images, the Patriots' indomitable march to their fourth Super Bowl triumph, while also offering perspective on their seven previous visits to football's ultimate spectacle.
Ernie Banks
Ernie Banks By Phil Rogers

Respected by his baseball peers and beloved by Chicago fans and teammates, Ernie Banks did everything there was to do in the game he loved. Everything, that is, except play in a World Series. How and why that experience eluded him during one season of particular promise—1969—is a key storyline of this fresh look at one of baseball's legendary players. The life of Banks, who had picked cotton outside Dallas as a youth, ascended from a barnstorming semipro team to the major leagues after Kansas City Monarchs manager Buck O'Neil placed him with the Cubs, is detailed in this biography of Mr. Cub. During his time in Chicago, Banks won two MVPs and received an education far better than the one he received in the segregated schools he'd attended, gaining important life skills while playing the game he was born to play.
We Love Each Other
We Love Each Other Illustrated by Yusuke Yonezu

A clever and charming board book with an upbeat theme and a special surprise on the last page—a North American debut by a brilliant illustrator Love is everywhere! And it’s not just us humans. From birds to elephants, rabbits to turtles, there is love and togetherness depicted on every page. Very young readers will enjoy the surprises in this cheerfully inventive little book. The bold, colorful illustrations reveal a surprise beneath the flap on every page, with a final delightful surprise on the last page. Read more...
Live Young, Think Young, Be Young
Live Young, Think Young, Be Young By Donald M. Vickery, By Larry Matson, By Carol Vickery

Why do we believe that aging is the cause of most of our problems as we get older? Age and aging actually have much less to do with it than you think. Live Young, Think Young, Be Young challenges our assumptions and beliefs about aging, and provides a fresh, new understanding of how and why we grow old. It will make you think differently about little things in your daily life that accelerate the three “mega” causes of getting old. In the end, this book is about courage and resilience—the courage to change what can be changed and the resilience to accept what can’t be changed. Together, they provide a powerful plan for staying young in body, mind, and spirit. Read more...
Lemistry
Lemistry Edited by Ra Page, Edited by Magda Raczynska

A celebration of Polish science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem, this anthology brings together writers, critics, and scientists who continue to grapple with Lem’s concerns. Featuring short stories, essays, and especially commissioned translations, this account speculates on Lem’s life and vision while delivering brand-new fiction. From computer games (The Sims was inspired by one of his short stories) to films (the red and blue pills of The Matrix owe much to his Futurological Congress), the presence of this masterful writer can be traced far and wide. Contributors include Brian Aldiss, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Mike Nelson, Jacek Dukaj, and more. Read more...
Report from Planet Midnight
Report from Planet Midnight By Nalo Hopkinson

Infused with feminist, Afro-Caribbean views of the science fiction and fantasy genres, this collection of offbeat and highly original works takes aim at race and racism in literature. In “Report from Planet Midnight,” at the International Association of the Fantastic in the Arts, an alien addresses the crowd, evaluating Earth's "strange" customs, including the marginalization of works by nonwhite and female writers. “Message in a Bottle” shows Greg, an American Indian artist, befriending a strange four-year-old who seems wise beyond her years. While preparing an exhibition, he discovers that the young girl is a traveler from the future sent to recover art from the distant past—which apparently includes his own work. Concluding the book with series editor Terry Bisson’s Outspoken Interview, Nalo Hopkinson shares laughs, loves, and top-secret Caribbean spells. Read more...
Christmas Doodle & Colouring Book
Christmas Doodle & Colouring Book By Egmont Books

What does Father Christmas' workshop look like? What are the children building in the snow? It's time to create your own festive doodles and color right through Christmas with this fun doodle and coloring book. With over 100 funny festive doodles to color in and complete, this book is sure to keep any child entertained over the Christmas period. Read more...