New & Notable

Remember, Remember
Remember, Remember By Lisa Cutts

This second book in the DC Nina Foster series, a taut and gripping police procedural crime novelWhen Nina returns to work after recovering from a near-fatal injury, she's supposed to be keeping her head down. But the cold case she's working on—an infamous train crash from 1964—is no match for the lure of the shootings, drugs deaths, and robberies keeping her colleagues busy. And before long she uncovers crucial new evidence linking the historic crash to the current spate of heroin-related deaths. Once again, she's back at the center of a complex case which brings her face-to-face with a network of criminals who will stop at nothing to protect their empire. Brilliantly plotted and fast-paced, Remember, Remember cements Lisa Cutts' reputation as a crime author of gripping fiction straight from the front line of modern policing.
I, Humanity
I, Humanity By Jeffrey Bennett

Part of a set of books launched to the International Space Station through NASA’s Story Time from Space program, read aloud by astronauts for children around the world. Written in the first person with the viewpoint of a narrator who represents the human race throughout history, I, Humanity tells the story of what we now know about the universe and how we learned it. It begins with the ancient view of a small, flat Earth, and page-by-page shows how we’ve gradually learned about our planet, its orbit, and its place in the vast universe. The book is designed to work on three different levels: education, perspective, and inspiration. The educational aspect comes in the factual content of the story, the perspective element involves enabling children learn to see themselves and our planet in a new light, and the inspirational component comes in helping children dream of how they can help make the world a better place.

"I love this book. I, Humanity masterfully describes human exploration of the heavens in an easy, flowing narrative. Elegantly presented scientific and historical information will have readers returning to its pages again and again." -- Andrea Beaty, author of New York Times bestseller Rosie Revere, Engineer

Little Banty Chicken and the Big Dream
Little Banty Chicken and the Big Dream By Lynea Gillen, Illustrated by Kristina Swarner

More than just a bedtime story, this enchanting book tells the tale of one little chicken that, with the support of her barnyard friends and the wise moon, has the courage to make her dream come true. The message of the story is uplifting and will encourage children to realize their dreams and talk about them with those they love. Sweet, vibrant illustrations and the rhythm of each character's actions rippling out toward a positive outcome will engage readers of all ages. Included are bonus activities to inspire children to share and work together to realize their dreams.
A Hard Woman to Kill
A Hard Woman to Kill By Alex Howard

Chechnya: an incorruptible security officer is assassinated. Berlin: a small child grieves for his father. In the East: an obese psychopath sets his feet on the first rungs of his criminal career. A frightened Russian woman seeks DCI Hanlon's help in finding her missing husband. Hanlon's not keen on the case. Until she hears a name she recognizes only too well. Arkady Belanov, sadistic pimp and owner of an exclusive brothel in Oxford is involved.  When DI Enver Demirel, her former partner and friend, disappears, Hanlon is forced into an uneasy alliance with the London underworld to rescue him from the blood-stained hands of the Russian mafia.
Birdology By Monica Russo, Photographs By Kevin Byron

An engaging book that encourages young nature enthusiasts to explore the world of birds

* Finalist for the AAAS/Subaru Science Book & Film Prize for Hands-On Science Books.

* Selected to the 2016 Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 list for the NSTA (National Science Teacher's Association). 

This generously illustrated, full-color book teaches kids that birds can be seen almost anywhere: in city parks and streets, zoos, farms, and backyards. Using “Try This,” “Look For,” and “Listen For” prompts, Birdology promotes independent observation and analysis, writing and drawing skills, and nature literacy. Kids observe the diversity of shapes, colors, patterns, and behavior of birds; listen for their songs and the clap of wings; make a juice-box feeder; plant flowers that attract hummingbirds; start a birding journal and sketchbook; and much more. Other topics that are presented in clear, kid-friendly prose include migration, nesting, food, territories, and conservation and preservation. Additional resources, such as a glossary, bird orders and scientific names, bird and wildlife organizations, and “Teacher Topics” to initiate classroom discussion and investigation, are also included.

Shards By F. J. R. Titchenell, By Matt Carter

With a strong Lovecraftian bent, this is the continuing saga of ordinary human resistors who must sacrifice their normal lives in favor of fighting for all humankind When autumn descends on Prospero, California, Ben Pastor hopes that the normality of the new school year may offer a reprieve from the town's recent paranormal horrors. Mina Todd, however, knows all too well that there are no reprieves and no normality in this town, especially after she starts having crippling, unexplained hallucinations of the dead. But even she can't prepare for what the coming year holds. On top of a brewing civil war that threatens all of humanity, inside the walls of Prospero High, Ben, Mina, and their expanding network face a sinister campaign that aims to destroy their friendship, a newly human Haley Perkins struggling to readjust to life, and an assassin of untold power who is picking off human rebels. Ben and Mina's one hope may rest with a mysterious figure hiding in the woods outside of town; a living legend who may know how to stop this dangerous new breed of supernatural foe. That is, assuming the figure doesn't first kill everyone himself.

"Maintaining the same level of popcorn-munching fun, Titchenell and Carter are taking the Prospero Chronicles in a promising direction" —Washington Independent Review of Books

"A snapping, crackling, popping homage to classic horror that alludes to no optimistic resolution—all the more reason for a series." —Kirkus Reviews on Splinters

"Titchenell and Carter hold nothing back in this solid sequel that thrills and expands on its predecessor. Aided by swift writing, relatable characters and unexpected scares, Shards is a chill-inducing delight." —David Powers King, co-author, Woven

The Little Book of Beards
The Little Book of Beards By Rufus Cavendish

This pocket-sized guide will teach any facial hair aficionado how to best care for their beard 

Start grooming your Gandalf and break out your Blessed; the beard is back. This impeccably turned-out little guide on the world’s most famous facial embellishments will teach you how to groom, craft, style and quote your way to beard greatness.
Chicago: Then and Now®
Chicago: Then and Now® By Kathleen Maguire

This book pairs archival photos with modern views to tell the story of the city’s rich history. It is a story of determination and pride, and the evocative photos on these pages reflect the many faces of Chicago’s heritage. Sites include: Grant Park, Lincoln Park, Wabash Avenue, Lake Street, Marshall Field's, State Street, Palmer House, Reliance Building, the Chicago Theatre, Majestic Theatre and Biograph Theater, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Cultural Center, South Michigan Avenue, North Michigan Avenue, Board of Trade Building, The Rookery, Old Colony Building, Dearborn Street Station, Chicago and North Western Terminal, Illinois Central Railyards, State Street Bridge, Michigan Avenue Bridge, Wacker Drive, Chicago River from the Wrigley Building, Water Tower, Lake Shore Drive, Navy Pier, Oak Street Beach, Merchandise Mart, Wrigley Field, Comiskey Park, the Union Stockyards, and much more. A detailed map lists major downtown sites featured in the book.
The Cost of Lunch, Etc.
The Cost of Lunch, Etc. By Marge Piercy

"As always, Piercy writes with high intelligence, love for the world, ethical passion, and innate feminism." —Adrienne Rich, feminist and author, A Change of WorldIn this collection of short stories, bestselling author. Marge Piercy brings us glimpses into the lives of everyday women moving through and making sense of their daily internal and external worlds. Keeping to the engaging, accessible language of Piercy's novels, the collection spans decades of her writing along with a range of locations, ages, and emotional states of her protagonists. From the first-person account of hoarding and a girl's narrative of sexual and spiritual discovery to the recounting of a past love affair, each story is a tangible, vivid snapshot in a varied and subtly curated gallery of work. Whether grappling with death, familial relationships, friendship, sex, illness, or religion, Piercy's writing is as passionate, lucid, insightful, and thoughtfully alive as ever. This paperback edition includes a new introduction from the author.
Religion By Margret de Heer

A humorous yet substantive introduction to the world's religions and their concepts. Explaining the five major religions and modern spirituality in clear, colorful chapters, this illustrated primer is a great way to introduce a complex topic. In her easily accessible style, Margreet de Heer explores religious history and practices in an unbiased way and with a dash of humor, and makes it approachable for those with little knowledge of the subject. It offers a fresh look from different perspectives on the phenomenon of religion; the backgrounds and history of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism; and makes the point that religion is something that should unite us, not drive us apart.
Swing in the House and Other Stories
Swing in the House and Other Stories By Anita Anand

Great Canadian writing out of Quebec, which features stories about families in their most private momentsSwing in the House paints an utterly contemporary portrait of Canadian families. Anand pulls back the curtains to reveal the unspoken complexities within the modern home, from sibling rivalries to fracturing marriages, casual racisms to damaged egos, hidden homosexuality to mental illness. Each of these stories offers a deftly constructed morality play. In the novella-length title story, a young mother timidly explores the possibilities of an affair to alleviate the suffocations of a loveless marriage, to detrimental effect. In "Indelible Markers," a girl vacationing in Greece learns that growing up with a schizophrenic father has affected her relationship with men. In "Something Steady," a lonely, mentally challenged teen vents his anger on a co-worker's boyfriend. Throughout, Anand's incisive intelligence, sharp prose, and sly wit breathe dark undercurrents into these 17 cautionary tales.
The Finger Trap
The Finger Trap By Johnny Worthen

When the only way out is deeper in, and your back's against the wall, even slackers get ambitious. Tony Flaner is a malingering part-time comedian, full-time sarcastic who's never had it hard and never finished a thing in his life. He's had twelve years to prepare for his divorce and didn't. He had his entire life to choose a career and hasn't. Now time's up, and he's in a world of trouble. But it gets worse—a first date and a drunken party ends with Tony facing prison for the murder of a girl he hardly knew. Other than that, it was a pretty great party. To save himself, wise-cracking Tony must discover who the mysterious girl was, what she was involved in, and what the hell she saw in him in the first place. Their lives are linked together at the ends of a Chinese finger trap, like life and death, friends and enemies, arugula quiche, and pigs knuckles.
Gilliamesque By Terry Gilliam

The legendary director, animator and founding member of Monty Python offers an intimate glimpse into his world in this fascinating memoir illustrated with hand-drawn sketches, notes, and memorabilia from his personal archive.

From his no-frills childhood in the icy wastes of Minnesota, to some of the hottest water Hollywood had to offer, via the cutting edge of '60s and '70s counter-culture in New York, LA and London, Terry Gilliam's life has been as vivid and unorthodox as one of his films. Gilliam's "pre-posthumous memoir" also features a cast of amazing supporting characters including George Harrison, Robin Williams, Jeff Bridges, Robert De Niro, Brad Pitt, Uma Thurman, Johnny Depp, Heath Ledger and all of the fellow Pythons, as well as cameo appearances from some of the heaviest cultural hitters of modern times, from Woody Allen to Frank Zappa, Gloria Steinem to Robert Crumb, Richard Nixon to Hunter S. Thompson. Gilliam's encounters with the great and the not-so-good are revealing, funny and hugely entertaining. This book is an unrestrained look into a unique creative mind and an incomparable portrait of late 20 century popular culture.
Delicato Family Cookbook
Delicato Family Cookbook By Dorothy Indelicato

The Delicato Family Winery has lovingly performed its craft for 85 years in the historic wine-growing region of California's Lodi Valley, and with this book, second generation matriarch Dorothy Indelicato provides readers with a culinary tour through the family's recipes. From simple, quick dishes to all-day affairs—from Minted Tomatoes Salad and Pasta Ascuitto to Champagne Veal, Pancakes with Wine Sauce, and the sainted Osso Buco—this cookbook is a mix of old-world Italian and Portuguese cuisine and the rich family backstory, making it a must-read for cooking enthusiasts. The book also features details on wine, including the proper methods for cooking with wine, pairing information, and marinade recipes.
The Big Bamboozle
The Big Bamboozle By Cheri Huber, By Ashwini Narayanan

Zen techniques, from a renowned Zen teacher, to derive greater satisfaction from life. Are you making choices that are supposed to give you what you want but leave you feeling unfulfilled and disappointed? This new book is based on the Buddha's teachings and the practice of Zen, and breaks down the structures of this karmic process. Written in a humorous and lighthearted style, it illustrates through essays, stories, and examples what keeps us from choosing well-being, love, happiness, and joy as our life experience. In addition, the book contains a full year of practical exercises and nuggets of wisdom from those who have practiced with these teachings. 
The Sea Is Ours
The Sea Is Ours Edited by Jaymee Goh, Edited by Joyce Chng

The stories in this collection merge technological wonder with the everyday. Children upgrade their fighting spiders with armor, and toymakers create punchcard-driven marionettes. Large fish lumber across the skies, while boat people find a new home on the edge of a different dimension. Technology and tradition meld as the people adapt to the changing forces of their world. The Sea Is Ours is an exciting new anthology that features stories infused with the spirits of Southeast Asia's diverse peoples, legends, and geography.
The Wish Dog
The Wish Dog Edited by Penny Thomas, Edited by Stephanie Tillotson

Haunting tales from Welsh women writers 18 short stories that will stalk your dreams... The Wish Dog and Other Stories takes you into the realm of the unknown, the ghostly and the gothic, in a colorful kaleidoscope of half-glimpsed shades. The title story, "The Wish Dog" conjures up a fetch – a lifetime companion much wanted; "Harvest" is a haunting reworking of "Babes in the Wood"; "Sovay, Sovay" tells of a Grand Guignol actress who loses her head to a dream of romance and returns with a thousand stories to tell to her bewitched audience; in "Broad Beach" a man who has had a close encounter with death has dreams that seem larger than life – what he wants most is to run, like the athlete he watches at the tideline each day. Other tales feature a ghostly mansion in a Merthyr park, a lonely soldier permanently on guard, the angel of death and a would-be suicide, a lonely Inuit asleep on a mountainside, a row of small wet footprints on floorboards... Open the pages if you dare, but don't forget to look behind you.
Creamy Psychology
Creamy Psychology By Yvonne Todd

Creamy Psychology surveys Yvonne Todd's work since the late 1990s, including her recent Gilbert Melrose project (for which Todd printed the photographs taken by her second cousin in 1957) and her latest photographic series Ethical Minorities (Vegans). It contains new essays by Todd herself, Robert Leonard (on Todd and cults), Misha Kavka (on Todd and daytime TV), Claire Regnault (on Todd the costume fetishist), Megan Dunn (on Todd, Karen Carpenter, and anorexia), and Anthony Byrt (on Todd's Gilbert Melrose project). It also contains an archival section with earlier essays, including key pieces by Leonard, Dunn, Justin Paton, and Justin Clemens. Comprehensively illustrated, Creamy Psychology is the new go-to book on Yvonne Todd. It will be accompanied by a major show at City Gallery Wellington, to open in December.
Flower Addict
Flower Addict By Saskia Havekes

Dive into a world of breathtaking flowers from Australia's most-loved florist. Immerse yourself in florist Saskia Havekes' mind-numbingly beautiful world of flowers. Grandiflora, the highly acclaimed business she started 20 years ago, is known as much for its large-scale events with cascading flowers and extravagant arrangements as for its exquisite, intimate bouquets of petal-perfect blooms. Here, Saskia shares some of her favorite floral moments, captured in glorious detail by photographer Nick Watt.
Human Punk
Human Punk By John King

A rare novel set against a punk-rock background that works as a cultural document—punk and politics: a way of life. A film based on the novel is currently in development. For 15-year-old Joe Martin, growing up on the outskirts of West London, the summer of 1977 means punk rock, busy pubs, disco girls, stolen cars, social-club lager, cutthroat Teddy Boys, and a job picking cherries with the gypsies. Life is sweet—until he is attacked by a gang of youths and thrown into the Grand Union Canal with his best friend Smiles. Fast forward to 1988, and Joe is traveling home on the Trans-Siberian Express after three years away, remembering the highs and lows of the intervening years as he comes to terms with tragedy. Fast forward to 2000, and life is sweet once more. Joe is earning a living selling records and fight tickets, playing his favorite 45s as a punk DJ, but when a face from the past steps out of the mist he is forced to relive that night in 1977 and deal with the fallout. Human Punk is the story of punk, a story of friendship, and a story of common bonds and a shared culture—sticking the boot in, sticking together. This edition includes a new introduction from the author.
The Watchers
The Watchers Photographs By Haley Morris-Cafiero

Previously published online and receiving viral exposure, this series of photographs examines how society uses gaze to project emotion and how we interpret the looks of others. The project began after the photographer noticed the facial expressions of a man standing behind her in the self-portrait she had set up in the middle of Times Square.  Intrigued by the man and a similar photo that followed on the roll of film the photographer decided to set up her camera for the purpose of capturing the expressions of passersby.  Each frame is chosen based on the strangers in the background, if they have a critical or questioning look, or if there is a gesture in their body language. By reversing the gaze back on the strangers, the collection begins a conversation about nonverbal interaction and the view society has on body image.
Rant. Chant. Chisme.
Rant. Chant. Chisme. By Amalia Ortiz

Rant. Chant. Chisme. is the debut collection of poetry by south Texas native Amalia Ortiz, featuring writing from the first decade of her career. Readers will get a taste of life on the border from the perspective of a young woman of color struggling to write herself into existence. These poems introduce a unique new transcultural feminist viewpoint as the poems call for social and political change along the borderlands. Ortiz, an award-winning performance poet known for her dynamic delivery style, relinquishes control of her writing to the reader, but not without first imparting the theatrical stage directions stated in the book's title, which commands readers to recite these poems aloud in a spoken word celebration exploring culture, music, and place while encouraging the reader to embrace diversity and find their own storytelling voice. 
Gotta Go Gotta Flow
Gotta Go Gotta Flow By Patricia Smith, Photographs By Michael Abramson

Mesmerized by the '70s nightclub culture on Chicago's South Side, Michael Abramson became a part of the scene and spent three years taking photographs in five clubs. More than 40 years later, Patricia Smith, nationally known poet and slam poetry champion, comes across Abramson's work and is inspired. Smith, who knew the clubs well, brings this collection of photographs to life with eighty poetic stories. Combining black and white photography with poetry, this book gives readers a front-row seat to the grooviest nightclubs of the 1970's.
The Paradise Bird
The Paradise Bird By Marcus Pfister

From the author of The Rainbow Fish, a young bird finds the cure for boredom The ravens are as bored as can be, but luckily something interesting tumbles at them in the form of a bright and noisy paradise bird. And this colorful bird is about to change their outlook on life in ways they never expected. Before long, the flock of sullen ravens will be on its feet dancing, as will anyone who reads this funny, spirited book that will delight any child who claims to be bored.
Landmarks By Robert Macfarlane

#1 bestseller on the UK Sunday Times list, from the acclaimed author of The Old Ways. Words are grained into our landscapes, and landscapes are grained into our words. Landmarks is about the power of language to shape our sense of place. It is a field guide to the literature of nature, and a glossary containing thousands of remarkable words used in England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales to describe land, nature, and weather. Traveling from Cumbria to the Cairngorms, and exploring the landscapes of Roger Deakin, J. A. Baker, Nan Shepherd, and others, Robert Macfarlane shows that language, well used, is a keen way of knowing landscape, and a vital means of coming to love it.
Heyday By Marnie Woodrow

Two lively girls meet aboard a roller coaster in 1909 and develop a special connection. A modern-day woman grieves the loss of her lesbian partner with whom she was not in love. Heyday is a double-barreled novel that features separate story lines set in different eras, both of which explore the soul's quest for pleasure and the power of love to endure through lifetimes.
Escape Points
Escape Points By Michele Weldon

Award-winning journalist Michele Weldon provides a potent antidote to the harried single mom stereotype in this beguiling memoir of raising three sons alone in the face of cancer, an ambitious career, and the shadow of her ex. Untethered from a seemingly idyllic life with a handsome but abusive attorney husband, Weldon relates the challenges and triumphs of the years that followed her divorce as she maneuvers through a complicated life of long daily commutes, radiation treatments, supporting the boys' all-consuming high school wrestling careers, and trying to mitigate their hurt and resentment at an absent father. By turns humorous and heartbreaking, Weldon describes facing her fears and failures honestly, guided by a belief in the power of staying calm, doing one's best, and asking for help. She provides a graceful example of how a single mother, and her children, can succeed when others—neighbors, family, teachers, and in this case an incredible high school wrestling coach—step in to fill the void and she can stay the course with common sense and dutiful love.
This Ordinary Life
This Ordinary Life By Jennifer Walkup

A teen pursues her dream of becoming a radio DJ, while struggling with her brother's epilepsy, her mother's alcoholism, and her own broken heart. High-school radio host Jasmine Torres's life is full of family dysfunction, but if she can score the internship of her dreams with a New York City radio station, she knows she can turn things around. That is, until her brother Danny's latest seizure forces her to miss the interview, and she's back to the endless loop of missing school for his doctor appointments, picking up the pieces of her mother's booze-soaked life, and stressing about Danny's future. Then she meets Wes. He's the perfect combination of smart, cute, and funny. He also happens to have epilepsy like her brother. Wes is living a normal life despite his medical issues, which gives Jasmine hope for Danny. But memories of her cheating ex-boyfriend keep Jasmine from going on a real date with Wes, no matter how many times he asks her. Jasmine can't control everything, not who wins the internship, not her mother's addiction, not her brother's health, not even where her heart will lead her. She wishes she could just have an ordinary life, but Jasmine may just discover that what she already has is pretty extraordinary after all.
The Ice Cream Blonde
The Ice Cream Blonde By Michelle Morgan

A beloved film comedienne who worked alongside the Marx Brothers, Laurel and Hardy, and dozens of others, Thelma Todd was a rare Golden Age star who successfully crossed over from silent films to talkies. This authoritative new biography traces Todd's life from a vivacious little girl who tried to assuage her parents' grief over her brother's death, to an aspiring teacher turned reluctant beauty queen, to an outspoken movie starlet and restaurateur. Increasingly disenchanted with Hollywood, in 1934 Todd opened Thelma Todd's Sidewalk Café, a hot spot that attracted fans, tourists, and celebrities. Despite success in film and business, privately the beautiful actress was having a difficult year–receiving disturbing threats from a stranger known as the Ace and having her home ransacked–when she was found dead in a garage near her café. An inquest concluded that her death, at age just twenty-nine, was accidental, but in a thorough new investigation that draws on interviews, photographs, documents, and extortion notes–much of these not previously available to the public–Michelle Morgan offers a compelling new theory, suggesting the sequence of events on the night of her death and arguing what many people have long suspected: that Thelma was murdered.But by whom?The suspects include Thelma's movie-director lover, her would-be-gangster ex-husband, and the thugs who were pressuring her to install gaming tables in her popular café–including a new, never-before-named mobster. This fresh examination on the eightieth anniversary of the star's death is sure to interest any fan of Thelma Todd, of Hollywood's Golden Age, or of gripping real-life murder mysteries.
My First Bilingual Book–A Day (English–Spanish)
My First Bilingual Book–A Day (English–Spanish) By Milet Publishing

Guaranteed to enrich a toddler's vocabulary, this simple and fun series of bilingual board books is ideal for helping children discover a foreign language.  Highlighting more complex concepts that go beyond colors and numbers, titles in the series feature animals, clothes, fruit, home, jobs, music, opposites, plants, school, sports, tools, vegetables, and vehicles. This collection combines photographs, bright illustrations, and dual-language words in clear, bold text. Suitable for both individuals and groups, these books are a child's perfect introduction to exploring other cultures.
Prisnms By Garth St Omer

The news of an old friend's murder throws Eugene Coard, a St Lucian psychiatrist in the USA, into reflections on his own successful migrant's journey. Trouble is, Coard is a devious liar and self-inventor who has turned American paranoia about race to his own advantage. A witty and satirical novel that challenges the reader to ask: just what can they believe?
The Soldier and the Gentlewoman
The Soldier and the Gentlewoman Edited by Lucy Thomas, By Hilda Vaughan

It is the end of the First World War and the men are returning home. Gwenllian Einon-Thomas cannot share in the feeling of joy at their return, however. Industrious, intelligent and fiercely determined, she has more than proven her mettle in the management of her country estate while her brothers fought and died in the war. For her, peacetime means the end of independence and the loss of her beloved ancestral home, which is entailed upon her cousin, Dick. A young soldier, enfeebled by his injuries Dick is looking forward to a tranquil life in the Welsh countryside. Instead he finds himself drawn into an even deadlier battle. This dark and unsettling tale was first published by Gollancz in 1932, and was dramatised for the stage and screen.
My Bedtime Monster
My Bedtime Monster By Annelies Schwarz, Illustrated by Kveta Pacovská

A wild bedtime story that celebrates the power of imagination with lavish, eccentric illustrations.  Little Rikki wishes she had a pet that could do anything she wanted: be cuddly or fierce, small or large, or swim or fly. Though her mother tells her no such creature exists, Rikki is pretty certain it must. Sure enough, given Rikki's active imagination, her dream pet shows up to take her on an unforgettable journey that is both exciting and a little scary. This is a magical book, full of wonder and whimsy, sure to appeal to young dreamers.
You Look Yummy!
You Look Yummy! By Tatsuya Miyanishi

This sweet tale about the love between father and son is the first in a tremendously popular Tyrannosaurus series in 12 titles to date, with combined sales in excess of 3 million copies in Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan and France.  A long, long time ago, a baby Ankylosaurus is born on a volcano erupting ground. As the little Ankylosaurus begins wandering around, a big Tyrannosaurus comes along. He is about to pounce when the baby cries out, "Daddy!" and grabs onto his leg. The baby thinks the Tyrannosaurus is his father, so as not to disappoint the little one, he takes on the task of raising a baby Ankylosaur. The two develop ever stronger bonds of love, but soon comes the day when they must part. Highlighting the importance of family, this sweet picture book celebrates the love between father and son.
Dreams Are Made for Children
Dreams Are Made for Children Selected by Misja Fitzgerald Michel, Illustrated by Ilya Green

Selections from the golden age of jazz for a serene night of sleep With whimsical, dream-like illustrations, this book and accompanying audio CD features a selection of timeless jazz dream songs to lull babies into a sweet, blissful sleep. The book includes 15 popular standards recorded by singing legends Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, Nat King Cole, Frank Sinatra, and Chet Baker, among others. Explanatory notes accompany each featured song in this must-have book for any jazz fans with a young child.
Smart Answers to Tricky Interview Questions
Smart Answers to Tricky Interview Questions By Rob Yeung

This is a book for job seekers that covers just about every interview scenario that they might have to deal with and includes over 200 examples of just about every question they may be asked, with examples of appropriate answers. Provides inside information from an author who is frequently asked by organizations to interview candidates, design assessment centers, and train interviewers. He writes the questions for interviewers to ask—and tells them the answers they should listen out for. This new edition includes a new chapter on building rapport and making a confident impact. Read more...
Dirty Blvd.
Dirty Blvd. By Aidan Levy

Lou Reed made it his mission to rub people the wrong way, whether it was with the noise rock he produced with the Velvet Underground in the late 1960s or his polarizing work with Metallica that would prove to be his swan song. On a personal level, too, he seemed to take pleasure in insulting everyone who crossed his path. How did this Jewish boy from Long Island, an adolescent doo-wop singer, rise to the status of Godfather of Punk? And how did he maintain that status for decades?Dirty Blvd.—the first new biography of Reed since his death in 2013—digs deep to answer those questions. And along the way it shows us the tender side of his prickly personality.Born in Brooklyn, Reed was the son of an accountant and a former beauty queen, but he took the road less traveled, trading literary promise for an entry-level job as a budget-label songwriter and founding the Velvet Underground under the aegis of Andy Warhol. The cult of personality surrounding his transformation from downtown agent provocateur to Phantom of Rock and finally to patron saint of the avant-garde was legendary, but there was more to his artistic evolution than his abrasive public persona. The lives of many American rock stars have had no second act, but Reed's did.Dirty Blvd. not only covers the highlights of Reed's career but also explores lesser-known facets of his work, such as his first recordings with doo-wop group the Jades, his key literary influences and the impact of Judaism upon his work, and his engagement with the LGBT movement. Drawing from new interviews with many of his artistic collaborators, friends, and romantic partners, as well as from archival material, concert footage, and unreleased bootlegs of live performances, author Aidan Levy paints an intimate portrait of the notoriously uncompromising rock poet who wrote "Heroin," "Sweet Jane," "Walk on the Wild Side," and "Street Hassle"—songs that transcended their genre and established Lou Reed as one of the most influential and enigmatic American artists of the past half-century. Read more...
Seeing Other People
Seeing Other People By Mike Gayle

A heartwarming, bittersweet novel about the modern man and the difficulties of relationships. Joe Clarke, father of two, is about 78 per cent sure he's just had an affair. After all that is the hopelessly attractive office intern in bed next to him, isn't it? But then again, if he did have an affair, why can't he remember anything at all about the night in question?  Mortified by his mistake, Joe vows to be a better man. But when his adored wife Penny puts two and two together and leaves him, things start to take a turn for the decidedly strange. Joe is told for a fact that he didn't have an affair after all. He just thinks he did. Which is great news—or at least it would be if the person who'd just delivered it wasn't the overly perfumed, mean-spirited ghost of his least favorite ex-girlfriend. This is a hilarious and bittersweet novel about love, parenthood, and fidelity, and how easy it is to get lost on the way to your own happy ending. Read more...
The Heart of Pope Francis
The Heart of Pope Francis By Diego Fares, Foreword by Antonio Spadaro, SJ

A presentation of what lies at the heart of Pope Francis' pontificate, written by his friend and fellow Jesuit At the heart of Pope Francis' vision lies a keen interest in people, and a passion for understanding the life experience of others. This book by a longtime friend of the Pope clarifies the underlying thoughts and choices Jorge Bergoglio has made throughout his life in developing a culture of encounter that he now proposes as the basis for the rebirth of the whole church, and the world. This little book is essential reading for anyone wanting to contribute to renewal in the Catholic Church. Read more...
A Prayer for World Peace
A Prayer for World Peace By Jane Goodall, Illustrated by Feeroozeh Golmohammadi

A universal message of hope and serenity among all of Earth's inhabitants Jane Goodall is a world-renowned naturalist who brings her passion and her quest for understanding between all the Earth's creatures to the fore in this beautiful and affecting prayer for world peace. She asks us all to rise above our dogmas, to bring a spirit of generosity to the living world around us, to pray for justice and for those who are suffering. Illustrated with rich and colorful artwork, this is prayer that's both personal and universal and one that will speak to people of all ages from all backgrounds. Read More
Spirit of Place
Spirit of Place By Charles MacLean, Photographs By Lara Platman, Photographs By Allan MacDonald

This wide-ranging and evocative photographic portrait of Scotland's distilleries, from Talisker to Lagavulin, from Laphroaig to Dalwhinnie, from the Isle of Arran to Glenkinchie, describes the "cultural terroir" of the country's fifty greatest distilleries–the ingredients, practices, and traditions that result in an exquisite range of single-malt whiskies. Over 250 specially commissioned photographs capture the texture of the surrounding landscapes through the changing seasons, vividly portray the craftsmen who work there, and detail the fabric of the buildings themselves.A unique addition to the literature on Scotch whisky, with text by the world's greatest whisky expert, Spirit of Place is the perfect gift for anyone planning to tour Scotland's distilleries, a souvenir for anyone who has visited them, and simply the perfect companion to a dram at home. Read more...
Judas By Damian Walford-Davies

Judas Iscariot—one of the Bible's most notorious characters—comes to life in this dramatic and thought-provoking new collection of poems by Damian Walford Davies. Fully aware of how ancient enmities shape modern conflicts, the author draws on 20 centuries of representations of Judas to set out a tale that challenges our preconceived notions of holiness and betrayal. Read more...
The First King of Hollywood
The First King of Hollywood By Tracey Goessel

Silent film superstar Douglas Fairbanks was an absolute charmer. Irrepressibly vivacious, he spent his life leaping over and into things, from his early Broadway successes to his marriage to the great screen actress Mary Pickford to the way he made Hollywood his very own town. The inventor of the swashbuckler, he wasn't only an actor—he all but directed and produced his movies, and in founding United Artists with Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, and D. W. Griffith, he challenged the studio system.But listing his accomplishments is one thing and telling his story another. Tracey Goessel has made the latter her life's work, and with exclusive access to Fairbanks's love letters to Pickford, she brilliantly illuminates how Fairbanks conquered not just the entertainment world but the heart of perhaps the most famous woman in the world at the time.When Mary Pickford died, she was an alcoholic, self-imprisoned in her mansion, nearly alone, and largely forgotten. But she left behind a small box; in it, worn and refolded, were her letters from Douglas Fairbanks. Pickford and Fairbanks had ruled Hollywood as its first king and queen for a glorious decade. But the letters began long before, when they were both married to others, when revealing the affair would have caused a great scandal.Now these letters form the centerpiece of the first truly definitive biography of Hollywood's first king, the man who did his own stunts and built his own studio and formed a company that allowed artists to distribute their own works outside the studio system. But Goessel's research uncovered more: that Fairbanks's first film appearance was two years earlier than had been assumed; that his stories of how he got into theater, and then into films, were fabricated; that the Pickford-Fairbanks Studios had a specially constructed underground trench so that Fairbanks could jog in the nude; that Fairbanks himself insisted racist references be removed from his films' intertitles; and the true cause of Fairbanks's death. Fairbanks was the top male star of his generation, the maker of some of the greatest films of his era: The Thief of Bagdad, Robin Hood, The Mark of Zorro. He was fun, witty, engaging, creative, athletic, and a force to be reckoned with. He shaped our idea of the Hollywood hero, and Hollywood has never been the same since. His story, like his movies, is full of passion, bravado, romance, and desire. Here at last is his definitive biography, based on extensive and brand-new research into every aspect of his career, and written with fine understanding, wit, and verve.
Walking Wounded
Walking Wounded By William McIlvanney

A gripping graphic novel illustrates the challenges of Iraq War veterans as well as their inspiring triumphs. After the shock of 9/11, for hundreds of thousands of young Americans there was Ar Ramadi, Baghdad, Abu Ghraib—the war in Iraq. Then came the trauma. From the torment of these vets to their reflections, Morel and artist Maël demonstrate the seemingly impossible return of those who aspire to get back to a normal life. The effort is huge; some can't make it and others score their own victory by finally turning the corner. Walking Wounded is a parable for our country's war sickness. Read more...
Death in Veracruz
Death in Veracruz By Hector Aguilar Camin

This novel marks the long-awaited arrival—in English—of a masterful voice in Mexican and noir fiction. Death in Veracruz is a gritty and atmospheric noir centered on the so-called oil wars of the late 1970s, which pitted the extremely powerful and corrupt government-owned oil cartel PEMEX against the agrarian landowners in the coastal regions of Southern Mexico. This novel, translated for the first time in English since its publication 30 years ago, concerns a journalist who investigates the death of a colleague and friend Rojano in a bizarre shooting incident that takes place in a small rural village, and who finds himself up against crooked police and a charismatic and ruthless union boss . But, as he gets deeper into this Mexican Heart of Darkness, he finds Rojano was not all he seemed, and neither was his widow with whom he falls into a doomed affair. Read more...
Inside Jihad
Inside Jihad By Tawfik Hamid

Why has radical Islam become such a deadly threat and why does it dominate the Muslim world? A quarter-century ago, Tawfik Hamid was recruited into Jamaa Islamiya, a terror group led by Dr. Ayman al-Zawahiri, the man who replaced Osama bin Laden to become the leader of al-Qaeda. Eventually and miraculously, Dr. Hamid recognized the insidious nature of violent jihad and rejected its distortions of the Quran, the holy book of the Muslim faith. Ever since, he has pursued a path of reformation within Islam by writing new interpretations of the book's key texts and by sharing his message in mosques. Inside Jihad reveals Dr. Hamid's insights about the Islamic terror movement drawn from his personal experiences. As a medical doctor and a psychologist, he helps readers understand the jihadist mindset. He also explains the meaning of jihad and the role that sex, petrodollars and the hijab for women play in its proliferation. And he details his bold plan for Islamic reformation that would eventually change the minds of jihadists and stop their reign of terror. Read more...
The Beauty of Ordinary Things
The Beauty of Ordinary Things By Harriet Scott Chessman

Back from a tour of duty in Vietnam, Benny Finn strives to find his bearings amid the everyday life of 1973 New England. At a Benedictine Abbey in rural New Hampshire, Sister Clare, a young novice, confronts the day-to-day realities of a cloistered existence. Linking the stories of Benny and Sister Clare is Isabel Howell, a college student soon to discover that she must chart the course of her own life in a way she could not have imagined. Deeply felt and often luminously moving, this powerful story reveals a writer richly aware of the range of human tragedy and tenderness. Read more...
If Picasso Went to the Zoo
If Picasso Went to the Zoo By Eric Gibbons

This book was conceived, written, and illustrated by 50 art teachers from all over the world who share a passion for art history and teaching. After the amazing success of Gibbons' first book, If Picasso Had a Christmas Tree, this follow-up book was created. Each teacher has emulated an artist of his/her choosing from history and includes an alliterative animal in a way that honors the work of that artist. By combining art, history, science (zoology) and poetry, this book becomes a unique resource for inter-curricular teaching. A combination of art genres is used, from the Renaissance era to modern works, which may bear little resemblance to zoo animals! These art teachers, from elementary level to high school, created these delightful illustrations to share and educate. ALL images in this book are NOT the work of the famous artists we have mentioned. These are emulations by art teachers with a zoo/animal theme. This is a common project in art classes around the world–to create an image in the style of a famous artist. We gather our work collectively here in the hopes to educate people about the rich traditions of art history, and hopefully to inspire our readers to learn more about these amazing artists as we attempt to honor them here! Read more...
Living in the Shadow of Death
Living in the Shadow of Death By Rabbi Stuart G. Weinblatt

A heartfelt account of how Rabbi Weinblatt confronts cancer after receiving this devastating diagnosis, this memoir traces his journey from beginning to end. It deals with his emotions, fears, and treatment and offers comfort, encouragement, and inspiration from a Jewish perspective. Using humor and coupling it with the wisdom of Jewish and Biblical sources as reflected in his sermons and other communications and writings, his words are a vehicle for sharing his experience and insights as he battles this disease. As a comforter to others, as well as a recipient of comfort, support, and love from family, friends, and members of his congregation, this book is also a valuable tool for clergy and health care professionals who interact with and counsel individuals in similar situations. Read more...
Pasha By Julian Stockwin

Another exciting volume in the popular high-seas nautical adventure series featuring the dashing and debonair naval commander Thomas Kydd. Word has come from the British ambassador Arbuthnot that the neutral Turks are being wooed by the French and if the ancient city of Constantinople falls into their hands, Napoleon's route to India will be completely unfettered and his plans for world domination a reality. Concerned for his safety, Arbuthnot is demanding a large fleet presence to take him off and bring the Turks to their senses. Braving treacherous currents, unreliable winds, and giant bombards, Thomas Kydd returns to sea and rescues the ambassador, but as Kydd waits for the rest of the expected fleet, the French are able to strengthen the Turkish defenses. Meanwhile Kydd's friend and confidential secretary, Nicholas Renzi, has assumed a new and dangerous role that he can never make public. He engineers a coup in the Topkapi Palace that turns the tables on the French but at the cost of both infidel nations being ejected from the Ottoman Empire. When Kydd learns of Renzi's incarceration in a Turkish prison, he knows if will take superb seamanship and sheer bravado to free his friend. Read more...
Tremendously Torn! Asger Jorn's Collages and Décollages
Tremendously Torn! Asger Jorn's Collages and Décollages By Axel Heil, By Katharina Henkel, By Maike Schmidt

Asger Jorn (1914–1973) was a Danish artist who, until 1964, worked exclusively with collages. He then made a complete about-face: from 1964 to 1969, he created a series of "décollages." For these works, he removed already existing material instead of adding it. He this new technique first on billboards and advertising pillars, using a knife or tearing sections of the layered posters with his bare hands, thus creating new pictorial surfaces and compositions. This catalog presents these groups of works, which are inextricably tied to each other within Asger Jorn's oeuvre as a whole. Read more...
Motherless Child
Motherless Child By Paul Scott

Motherless Child is the ultimate celebration and definitive biography of one of the most influential musicians alive today. From the 1960s graffiti proclaiming "Clapton is God," to his seminal work in supergroup Cream and his phenomenally successful solo career, Eric Clapton has achieved the status of bona fide living legend and enduring icon. Now in his sixth decade in the music business, he occupies an exulted position at the pinnacle of the rock world thanks to songs like Layla, Tears in Heaven, and Wonderful Tonight, and for many is considered the greatest guitarist who ever lived. This book will chart his rise to stardom in the 60s and his unparalleled success since walking out of the Yardbirds as a 20-year-old to follow his chosen path of the blues with John Mayall's Bluesbreakers and later with Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker in supergroup Cream, as well as his successful solo career. However, his success has come at a price. Once a happy well-adjusted boy, the young Clapton was devastated by the realization at the age of nine that the woman he thought was his sister was in fact his mother, and that the couple he thought were his parents were his maternal grandparents. His treatment by his mother was also to shape his future turbulent relationships with the women in his life, including his failed first marriage to model Pattie Boyd, who was married to Clapton's close friend George Harrison when he fell for her. Motherless Child also chronicles his battles with the demons of drugs and alcohol, his successful journey to sobriety, and examines his legacy as one of the most influential musicians of his generation. This is essential reading for any Clapton fan. Read more...
The 87 Rules for College
The 87 Rules for College By Jake Shore, By Drew Moffitt

The quintessential college guide that will show you how to succeed and fail in the best ways possible. Funny, awesome ways to get ahead in college without forgetting to have fun and get wild. If there's a way to succeed in college without forgetting to enjoy yourself this is it. Read more...
Shadows Collide
Shadows Collide By Dan Levinson

The Orion Psi Corps is in shambles, the dead still being counted. And though Orion's retaliation has begun, Calchis isn't finished yet. New Axom City—that's where Nyne Allen has taken refuge in the wake of his desertion from Orion. Soon, it will become a battlefield, as forces from both sides barrel toward a collision that will change the world forever. Meanwhile, in the Far East, Aaron Waverly learns the truth behind the red-robed man, even as a new threat looms that may one day devour everything. Read more...
Transcendental Train Yard
Transcendental Train Yard By Norma E Cantú, By Marta Sánchez

Transcendental Train Yard is a collection of color serigraphs accompanied by bilingual poems, in Spanish and English, inspired by the artwork. Transcendental Train Yard provides the reader a glimpse of the role the railroad and the carpas (itinerant vaudeville troupes) played in the Mexican American community. Artist Marta Sanchez and poet Norma Elia Cantú collaboratively render images and words that poignantly reflect specific periods in that history. The scholarly essays by Cortez and Haney and the evocative preface by noted Chicano scholar Tomás Ybarra Frausto bring an added depth.
Long Live the Modern
Long Live the Modern Edited by Julia Gatley

From houses, factories, bridges, and apartment blocks to chapels, motorways, and memorials, this pictorial history celebrates 180 iconic New Zealand buildings, sites, and neighborhoods, designed by many of the nation's most famous architects. The 46 contributing writers document each building's design, construction, context, and history, assisted by historic and contemporary photographs and floor plans. Representing a unique and precious part of New Zealand's history, this showcase reveals an acclimatized, vernacular style singularly adapted to suit the New Zealand climate and conditions. Read more...
From India With Love
From India With Love By Latika Bourke

Latika Bourke was adopted from India, aged eight months. Growing up in Bathurst, New South Wales, she felt a deep connection to her Australian home and her Australian family. It wasn't until she heard her name uttered in the hit movie Slumdog Millionaire that Latika recognized she knew nothing of her Indian roots, the world she was born into, and what she could have become had she not been brought to Australia as a baby. As Latika carved out a successful career for herself as an award-winning political journalist, she became more and more curious about her heritage and what it meant to be born in India and raised in Australia. And so began a deeply personal and sometimes confronting journey back to her birthplace to unravel the mysteries of her heritage. From India with Love is a beautiful story of finding your place in the world and finding peace with the path that led you there. Read more...
Sanctuary By Julie Leibrich

An engaging and moving book full of spiritual insight, wisdom, and warmth, this book is the result of a decade of exploration and contemplation of the concept of sanctuary. It is written in a way that happily combines reason and imagination, poetry and critical thinking, knowledge and originality. Sanctuary cuts across genres: at once a spiritual memoir; a collection of personal journal entries and brief discourses; and a window into the views of influential writers, thinkers and poets, and of the author's friends and acquaintances. Julie Leibrich's life journey has led her to discover the elements of the world and self that are most sacred. Read more...
Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre
Love Becomes a Funeral Pyre By Mick Wall

Spanning the entire history of the Doors, this book will long remain the definitive biography of a band that forever changed popular music. But it's not the story you think you know. Yes, Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971—but not in a bathtub. The other Doors were saddened and shocked but had already fired him anyway. It wasn't Jim who wrote the hits; it was guitarist Robby Krieger. It wasn't Jim who saw a bright, acid-flared future for the band but keyboardist Ray Manzarek.And so, the band that started out as the "American Rolling Stones," noted for their wildly unpredictable performances, their jazzy vibe, and the crazed monologues of their front man, ended as badly as did the sixties: abruptly, bloodily, cripplingly.Along with evoking the cultural milieu of Los Angeles in the sixties, in LoveBecomes a Funeral Pyre bestselling writer Mick Wall captures the true spirit of that tarnished age with a brilliantly penetrating and contemporary investigation into the real story of the Doors. Read more...
If These Walls Could Talk: Nebraska Cornhuskers
If These Walls Could Talk: Nebraska Cornhuskers By Jerry Murtaugh, By Jimmy Sheil, By Brian Rosenthal, By George Achola, By Brian Brashaw, Foreword by Mike'l Severe

Firsthand tales of the most memorable moments in Cornhusker football history. A traditional powerhouse, the Nebraska Cornhuskers are one of the most successful NCAA football teams, with five national championships and the highest winning percentage of any program over the last half century. Authors Jerry Murtaugh, an All-American linebacker at Nebraska in 1970, Jimmy Sheil, George Achola, Brian Rosenthal, and Brian Brashaw, through interviews with current and past players, provide fans with a one-of-a-kind, insider's look into the great moments, the lowlights, and everything in between in Cornhuskers history. Readers will hear from players, coaches, and administrators as they discuss their moments of greatness as well as their defeats, making If These Walls Could Talk: Nebraska Cornhuskers a keepsake no fan will want to miss. Read more...
Penny Siopis
Penny Siopis Illustrated by Penny Siopis, Edited by Gerrit Olivier

With her earliest work, Penny Siopis established herself as one of the most talented and challenging visual artists in and beyond South Africa. Penny Siopis: Time and Again engages in a variety of ways with her work of the past 35 years. A conversation between the artist and the editor, Gerrit Olivier, unfolds throughout the book, giving the reader fascinating insights into her working methods, her strong interest in form and different genres, her theoretical concerns and her views on the position of art in a socio-political context. The first chapter by Achille Mbembe, on her latest work, considers how creation takes hold in the wake of loss. Siopis's abiding interest in what she calls "the poetics of vulnerability"—manifest in a tension between materiality and image—coalesces with her explorations of history, sexuality, race, memory, estrangement, and violence in her paintings, installations, and films. With reference to her well-known works, these themes are explored in commentaries by T. J. Demos, Jennifer Law, Njabulo Ndebele, Sarah Nuttall, Griselda Pollock, and Colin Richards. A conversation between Siopis and William Kentridge illuminates the trajectory of their own work and that of South African art. As suggested by the title, this book is a stitching together of memory and the promise of return, of loss and creation in a process of perpetual renewal. Read more...
Peripheral Vision
Peripheral Vision By Paddy O’Reilly

A teenager on the tram meets an old man claiming to be Jesus Christ. Six young women band together on a night prowl. A Filipino immigrant clashes with his eldest sister, who has brought him to Australia for a better life. And in a future where dogs have risen up against their owners, a mother is alarmed by her adolescent daughter's behavior. Through such diverse characters, Paddy O'Reilly takes us into the fringes of human nature—our hidden thoughts, our darker impulses, and our unspoken tragedies. By turns elegiac and acerbic, but always acutely observed, Peripheral Vision confirms O'Reilly as one of our most inventive and insightful writers. Read more...
Journey to the Centre of the Earth
Journey to the Centre of the Earth Retold by Pauline Francis

This retelling of the classic Jules Verne tale tells the story of Professor Lidenbrock and his nephew, Axel, who make a terrifying journey into an extinct volcano—and right into the center of the Earth. Read more...
Dropping In
Dropping In By Geoff Havel

An action-packed middle-grade story that explores friendship, bullying, and living with a disability. Ian and Warren, better known as Sticks and Ranga, are best friends. They live on the same street, go to the same school and love the same things, like skateboarding and PlayStation. When new kid James arrives in class in his wheelchair, Sticks isn't sure they can be friends. But Sticks quickly discovers they have a lot in common. Cerebral palsy stops James from doing some things but it hasn't dulled his sense of humor—and he's pretty brainy, too. Soon James becomes an inseparable part of the Sticks, Ranga, and James show. Read more...
Head of the River
Head of the River By Pip Harry

Nine rowers, 2,000 grueling yards, and one chance for glory Tall, naturally talented, and the offspring of Olympians, superstar siblings Leni and Cristian Popescu are set to row Harley Grammar to victory in the annual Head of the River race. With six months until the big race, the twins can't lose. Or can they? When Cristian is seduced by the easy route of performance-enhancing drugs, and Leni is suffocated with self-doubt, their bright futures start to fade. Juggling family, high expectations, study, break-ups, new relationships, and wild parties, the pressure starts to build. As the final moments tick down to the big race, will they make it to the start line or will they plummet from grace? Read more...
Jennie Jenkins
Jennie Jenkins Adapted by John M. Feierabend, Illustrated by Ashley Maurer

A beautifully illustrated version of the classic and humorous song, "Jennie Jenkins." A beautiful take on a timeless story, this picture book will become a favorite of today's children, another wonderful chapter in the continuing legacy of a delightful, classic songtale. In the United States, "Jennie Jenkins" was sung as a way for a boy to ask a girl to dance. The boy would sing the first part and pick a color and the girl would have to make up an answer that rhymed. If the girl failed to quickly respond with an appropriate answer, she would be required to dance with the boy. The fully notated version of this song with all the words is included at the end of the book, along with a detailed history of the song. An MP3 of the song is also available for free download.. Read more...

The Berlin Cookbook
The Berlin Cookbook By Rose Marie Donhauser

Offering traditional recipes and stories about the heritage of Berlin food, the cookbook reveals easy-to-follow recipes for schnitzel, currywurst, eisbein, döner kebap, and those jelly donuts known as Berliners. How eisbein got its name, why Friedrich II made Prussian farmers plant potatoes, how meatballs were imported by Huguenots, and how Bismarck got his herring are also inside. This guide proves that Berlin cuisine is simple, wholesome, and down-to-earth. Read more...
Vesuvius By Zulmira Ribeiro Tavares, Translated by Hugh Hazelton

This is a collection of poems by noted Brazilian poet and novelist Zulmira Ribeiro Tavares, translated into English for the first time by Governor General Award–winning Hugh Hazelton. The book contains an introduction to the poet and presents the English-language translations alongside the original poetry.
A View from the Porch
A View from the Porch By Avi Friedman

This is the latest updated book from "Canada's housing guru" about how design affects our daily lives. This illuminating collection of 22 essays expounds upon the points where design touches life. The essays discuss the big and small things that make us appreciate, or become disconnected from, our homes and neighborhoods. Drawing on his experiences as an architect, planner, world traveler, and educator, Avi Friedman delves into issues such as the North American obsession with monster homes, the impact of scale on the feeling of comfort in our communities, environmental concerns such as deforestation, innovative recycling methods in building materials, the booming do-it-yourself industry, the decline of craftsmanship, and the role of good design in bringing families together. Written with Friedman's trademark flair, A View from the Porch offers a compelling vision of the influence of design in our everyday lives from one of the world's most innovative thinkers. With new material, this is a completely revised edition of Room for Thought, originally published in 2005. Read more...
The Theory of Light at Midnight
The Theory of Light at Midnight By Elizabeth Ukrainetz

Twenty years after a horrific captivity, Magda's perfect life begins to crumble. Helpless to the resurgence of memory, she collapses inward. Through a haze of desire frighteningly evocative of the attack, she desperately attempts to fit together the bits and pieces of self, which existed before and after. The Theory of Light at Midnight is the story of the disintegration of personality, and one woman's attempt to reconstruct integrity with the truth of brutality intact. Read more...
American Wine
American Wine By Tom Acitelli

From the author of The Audacity of Hops: The History of America's Craft Beer Revolution comes the triumphant tale of how America belted France from atop its centuries-old pedestal as the world's top wine-producing and wine-drinking nation. Until the mid-1970s, most American wine was far from fine. Instead, it was fortified and sweet, and came from grape varieties prized less for their taste than for their ability to ferment fast. Even in big cities, a bottle of domestically made Chardonnay or Merlot was hard to come by—and most Americans thought wine like that was for the wealthy anyway, not for them. Then a series of game-changing events and a group of plucky entrepreneurs transformed everything forever. Within a generation, America would stand unquestionably at the world vanguard of wine, reversing centuries of Eurocentrism and dominating the Field. This change spawned hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in sales. European vintners found themselves altering centuries-old recipes and techniques to cater to these newly ascendant, free-spending tastes. The most popular fine wines worldwide became big, powerful, and loud—American, in other words. American Wine tells that story.All the big players and milestones are here, with never-before-told details and analyses based on fresh interviews. Written in a fast-moving, engaging style free of wine jargon, American Wine is the first of its kind: a book focused solely on the rise of fine wine in the United States since the early 1960s, in California and elsewhere, and how that rise altered the way the world drinks—for better or worse. Read more...
Goldfish Memory
Goldfish Memory By Monique Schwitter, Translated by Eluned Gramich

What is it that makes one person a complete stranger, and another a friend, an accomplice, or even a lover? This is the question explored by these brilliant and quirky short stories. A traveler shuts himself up in his hotel room with no one but room service to talk to, a teenager stalks her long-lost father, a journalist interviews a great poet with a dark past, a woman pursues a doomed liaison with an anonymous man she meets once a month at the casino, a bar lady locked in with the regulars at night are just some tales in this collection that explore the mysterious and random side of human relationships. From the winner of the prestigious Robert Walser First Novel Award and Switzerland's Schiller Foundation Writers Prize, Goldfish Memory is a form-breaking work not to be missed. Read more...
The Promise
The Promise By Eva Schloss, By Barbara Powers

This is the remarkable true story of a young Jewish girl and her brother growing up during World War II, caught in a world turned upside down by the Nazis. Written specially for children, Eva describes her happy early childhood in Vienna with her kind and loving parents and her older brother Heinz, whom she adored. But when the Nazis marched into Austria everything changed. Eva's family fled to Belgium, then to Amsterdam where, with the help of the Dutch Resistance, they spent the next two years in hiding—Eva and her mother in one house, and her father and brother in another. Finally, though, they were all betrayed and deported to Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland. Despite the horrors of the camp, Eva's positive attitude and stubborn personality (which had often got her into trouble) saw her through one of the most tragic events in history, and she and her mother eventually returned to Amsterdam. Sadly her father and brother perished just weeks before the liberation. Eva and her mother went back to the house where Heinz and his father had hidden, for Eva had remembered that Heinz had told her he had hidden his paintings beneath the floorboards there. Sure enough, there were over 30 beautiful paintings. Heinz hadn't wasted any of his talents during his captivity. For Eva, here was a tangible, everlasting memory of her brother, and a reminder of her father's promise that all the good things you accomplish will make a difference to someone, and your achievements will be carried on. Heinz's paintings have been on display in exhibitions in the USA and are now a part of a permanent exhibition in Amsterdam's war museum. Told simply and clearly for younger readers, The Promise is an unforgettable story, written by Eva Schloss, the step-daughter of Otto Frank and Barbara Powers, Eva's very close friend. Read more...
Joss Whedon
Joss Whedon By Amy Pascale, Foreword by Nathan Fillion

From the cult favorite Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which netted four million viewers per episode, to the summer blockbuster The Avengers, which amassed a box office of $1.5 billion, Joss Whedon has made a name for himself in Hollywood for his penchant for telling meaningful, personal tales about love, death, and redemption even against the most dramatic and larger-than-life backdrops. This biography follows his development from a creative child and teenager who spent years away from his family at an elite English public school, through his early successes—which often turned into frustrating heartbreak in both television (Roseanne) and film (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)—to his breakout turn as the creator, writer, and director of the Buffy television series. Extensive, original interviews with Whedon's family, friends, collaborators, and stars—and with the man himself—offer candid, behind-the-scenes accounts of the making of groundbreaking series such as Buffy, Angel, Firefly, and Dollhouse, as well as new stories about his work with Pixar writers and animators during the creation of Toy Story. Most importantly, however, these conversations present an intimate and revealing portrait of a man whose creativity and storytelling ability have manifested themselves in comics, online media, television, and film. Read more...
Rant. Chant. Chisme.
Rant. Chant. Chisme. By Amalia Ortiz

Rant. Chant. Chisme. is the debut collection of poetry by south Texas native Amalia Ortiz, featuring writing from the first decade of her career. Readers will get a taste of life on the border from the perspective of a young woman of color struggling to write herself into existence. These poems introduce a unique new transcultural feminist viewpoint as the poems call for social and political change along the borderlands. Ortiz, an award-winning performance poet known for her dynamic delivery style, relinquishes control of her writing to the reader, but not without first imparting the theatrical stage directions stated in the book's title, which commands readers to recite these poems aloud in a spoken word celebration exploring culture, music, and place while encouraging the reader to embrace diversity and find their own storytelling voice. Read more...
Coast By Neil Oliver

The British Isles are magnificent places, filled with endlessly fascinating sights, stories, and people, and they are defined and shaped by their coast. Hundreds of spectacular photographs in this book hint at the wonder of the ever-changing place where the land meets the sea—from the privileged viewpoint of the birds. From small harbors to expansive bridges, towering cliffs to seaside resorts—Coast from the Air presents a dramatic new perspective on this green and pleasant land, and shows just how beautiful, surprising, and fragile that land can be. In 20 chapters—each one focusing on a specific coastal region of the British Isles—over 200 outstanding aerial photographs portray the beauty and diversity of the coastline. From the Dingle to The Wash, from the mild seaside towns of England's south coast to the storm-lashed fishing villages of the Outer Hebrides, Coast from the Air is a true visual feast. Read more...
Cook County ICU
Cook County ICU By Cory Franklin

An inside look at one of the nation's most famous public hospitals, Cook County, as seen through the eyes of its longtime Director of Intensive Care, Dr. Cory Franklin. Filled with stories of strange medical cases and unforgettable patients culled from a thirty-year career in medicine, Cook County ICU offers readers a peek into the inner workings of a hospital. Author Dr. Cory Franklin, who headed the hospital's intensive care unit from the 1970s through the 1990s, shares his most unique and bizarre experiences, including the deadly Chicago heat wave of 1995, treating some of the first AIDS patients in the country before the disease was diagnosed, the nurse with rare Munchausen syndrome, the first surviving ricin victim, and the famous professor whose Parkinson's disease hid the effects of the wrong medication. Surprising, darkly humorous, heartwarming, and sometimes tragic, these stories provide a big-picture look at how the practice of medicine has changed over the years, making it an enjoyable read for patients, doctors, and anyone with an interest in medicine. Read more...
Life for a Life
Life for a Life By T. Frank Muir

When a young woman's half-frozen body is found on Fife's Coastal Path, buried in snow and with the remnants of a rope manacle around her wrist, DCI Gilchrist takes the case. But Gilchrist's investigation uncovers a bloody trail of shootings and executions that lead him to the heart of a human trafficking war. Links to Scotland's foremost criminal family, the Home Office, and a ruthless killer intent on expanding his territory pull Gilchrist deeper into this murderous web until he comes face-to-face with the most dangerous man he has ever met. Read more...
The Badger
The Badger By William Fotheringham

Bernard Hinault is one of the greatest cyclists of all time. He is a five-time winner of the Tour de France and the only man to have won each of the Grand Tours on more than one occasion. In The Badger, bestselling author William Fotheringham finally gets to the bottom of this fascinating character and explores the reasons why France, the nation that considers itself cycling's home, has found it so hard to produce a successor. Hinault was the last "old-school" champion: a larger-than-life character from a working-class background, capable of winning on all terrains, in major Tours and one-day Classics. Nicknamed "The Badger" for his combative style, he led a cyclists' strike in his first Tour and instigated a legendary punch-up with demonstrators in 1982 while in the middle of a race. Hinault's battles with teammates Laurent Fignon and Greg LeMond provide some of the greatest moments in Tour history, and here they are made vivid once again. Read more...
Poems from the Second World War
Poems from the Second World War By Gaby Morgan

Poems from the Second World War is a moving and powerful collection of poems written by soldiers, nurses, mothers, sweethearts, and family and friends who experienced WWII from different standpoints. The Imperial War Museum was founded in 1917 to collect and display material relating to the "Great War," which was still being fought. Today IWM is unique in its coverage of conflicts, especially those involving Britain and the Commonwealth, from World War I to the present. They seek to provide for, and to encourage, the study and understanding of the history of modern war and wartime experience.. Read more...
My Life, My Body
My Life, My Body By Marge Piercy

In a candid and intimate new collection of essays, poems, memoirs, reviews, rants, and railerries, Marge Piercy discusses her own development as a working-class feminist, the highs and lows of TV culture, the ego dances of a writer's life, the homeless and the housewife, Allen Ginsberg and Marilyn Monroe, feminist utopias (and why she doesn't live in one), why fiction isn't physics; and of course, fame, sex, and money, not necessarily in that order. The short essays, poems, and personal memoirs intermingle like shards of glass that shine, reflect—and cut. Always personal yet always political, Piercy's work is drawn from a deep well of feminist and political activism. Also featured is an Outspoken Interview, in which the author lays out her personal rules for living on Cape Cod, caring for cats, and making marriage work. Read more...
The Pittsburgh Steelers Playbook
The Pittsburgh Steelers Playbook By Steve Hickoff

The X's and O's behind the Steelers' most memorable moments. For serious football fans wanting to relive the most unforgettable, extraordinary, and gut-wrenching plays in Pittsburgh Steelers history, this account explores the team's greatest calls, providing context, back story, relevant circumstances, and comments from those directly involved in each play. Dozens of color photos help to reanimate each memory, including the Immaculate Reception, Willie Parker's 75-yard Super Bowl XL run from scrimmage, quarterback Mark Malone's record-setting catch of 90 yards from Terry Bradshaw, and John Henry Johnson running for a 45-yard score to help the Steelers upset the Browns. Read more...
The Trains Now Departed
The Trains Now Departed By Michael Williams

Sometimes you come across a lofty railway viaduct, marooned in the middle of a remote country landscape. Or a crumbling platform from some once-bustling junction buried under the buddleia. If you are lucky you might be able to follow some rusting tracks, or explore an old tunnel leading to. . . well, who knows where? Listen hard. Is that the wind in the undergrowth? Or the specter of a train from a golden era of the past panting up the embankment? These are the ghosts of The Trains Now Departed. They are the railway lines, and services that ran on them that have disappeared and gone forever. Our lost legacy includes lines prematurely axed, often with a gripping and colorful tale of their own, as well as marvels of locomotive engineering sent to the scrapyard, and grand termini felled by the wrecker's ball. Then there are the lost delights of train travel, such as haute cuisine in the dining car, the grand expresses with their evocative names, and continental boat trains to romantic far-off places. The Trains Now Departed tells the stories of some of the most fascinating lost trains of Britain, vividly evoking the glories of a bygone age. In his personal odyssey around Britain Michael Williams tells the tales of the pioneers who built the tracks, the yarns of the men and women who operated them, and the colorful trains that ran on them. It is a journey into the soul of our railways, summoning up a magic which, although mired in time, is fortunately not lost forever. Read more...
Storm Moon
Storm Moon By Teri Harman

A betrayal, an invasion, and a plan that has spanned centuries are all unleashed in this, the final installment of the Moonlight Trilogy. After marrying her soul mate Simon Howard, Willa Fairfield prepares for the couple's honeymoon. But, unbeknownst to her, it is not Simon who is sleeping beside her; it is Bartholomew the Dark, the legendary and dangerous witch. As Willa's mother watches the couple leave for Europe, she has the inescapable feeling that something is terribly wrong, even as she tries to convince herself that she stopped believing such signs a long time ago when she turned away from a life of magic. How can Willa fight an enemy hidden behind Simon's eyes? Can she discover the evil that resides inside him when Bartholomew has the ability to control her mind? How can she save Simon and herself before Bartholomew destroys everything? With equal dashes of horror, romance, and adventure, this is the thrilling conclusion to the Moonlight Trilogy. Read more...
Voy a comedte!
Voy a comedte! By Jean Marc Derouen

A hungry, bad wolf with poor grammar waits silently in the woods for something delicious to stroll by. With such bad luck, two bunnies hop nearby and deceive the wolf so that they can escape unscathed. While it may seem like a typical story of the big, bad wolf being chastened by innocent animals, this book’s unique typography and the wolf’s bad diction sets it apart. Read more...
The Country of Wolves
The Country of Wolves By Neil Christopher, Illustrated by Ramon Perez

Based on the acclaimed animated film of the same name, this visually stunning graphic novel takes readers on a mysterious adventure with two brothers who are lost at sea. It begins as an average hunting trip for two young men. But when they find themselves adrift at sea, the only safe haven to be found for miles—a mysterious village filled with the sounds of drum dancing and revelry—turns out to be even more dangerous than the frigid ocean. Read more...
Stories for Chip
Stories for Chip Edited by Nisi Shawl, Edited by Bill Campbell

Stories for Chip brings together outstanding authors inspired by a brilliant writer and critic, Science Fiction Writers of America Grandmaster Samuel R. "Chip" Delany. Award-winning SF luminaries such as Michael Swanwick, Nalo Hopkinson, and Eileen Gunn contribute original fiction and creative nonfiction. From surrealistic visions of bucolic road trips to erotic transgressions to mind-expanding analyses of Delany's influence on the genre—as an out gay man, an African American, and possessor of a startlingly acute intellect—this book conveys the scope of the subject's sometimes troubling, always rewarding genius. Editors Nisi Shawl and Bill Campbell have given Delany and the world at large, a gorgeous, haunting, illuminating, and deeply satisfying gift of a book. Read more...
Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen
Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen Edited by Jeff Burger

Leonard Cohen, one of the most admired performers of the last half century, has had a stranger-than-fiction, roller-coaster ride of a life. Now, for the first time, he tells his story in his own words, via more than 50 interviews conducted worldwide between 1966 and 2012. In Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen—which includes a foreword by singer Suzanne Vega and eight pages of rarely seen photos—the artist talks about “Bird on the Wire,” “Hallelujah,” and his other classic songs. He candidly discusses his famous romances, his years in a Zen monastery, his ill-fated collaboration with producer Phil Spector, his long battle with depression, and much more. You’ll find interviews that first appeared in the New York Times and Rolling Stone, but also material that has not previously been printed in English. A few have not been available until now in any format, including many illuminating reminiscences that contributors supplied specifically for this definitive anthology. Read more...
The Capacity for Infinite Happiness
The Capacity for Infinite Happiness By Alexis von Konigslow

Mathematician Emily Kogan needs to finish her thesis, and her secretive family may be just the inspiration she's looking for. She decides to conduct research into the influence of personal relationships, using her family tree as an original social network. Tracing the spiderwebs of these connections, she learns far more than she bargained for. In the 1930s, Harpo Marx joins his brothers at the Kogan's Jewish-friendly resort in Canada. Unhappy after the death of his parents and uncertain in life after the latest Marx Brothers' movie flops at the cinemas, Harpo is looking for something or someone to save. Captivated by the mysterious Ayala Kogan and her two daughters, he is drawn deeply into the lives of the Kogan family and their tragic past. Effortlessly weaving together these two storylines, Alexis von Konigslow draws the reader into an astonishing tale of ill-fated love, extraordinary courage, and a daring transatlantic escape. Read more...
First Class
First Class By Alison Stewart, Foreword by Melissa Harris-Perry

Dunbar High School in Washington, DC, defied the odds and, in the process, changed America. In the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school, despite being racially segregated by law and existing at the mercy of racist congressmen who held the school’s purse strings. These enormous challenges did not stop the local community from rallying for the cause of educating its children. Dunbar attracted an extraordinary faculty: one early principal was the first black graduate of Harvard, almost all the teachers had graduate degrees, and several earned PhDs—all extraordinary achievements given the Jim Crow laws of the times. Over the school’s first eighty years, these teachers developed generations of highly educated, high-achieving African Americans, groundbreakers that included the first black member of a presidential cabinet, the first black graduate of the US Naval Academy, the first black army general, the creator of the modern blood bank, the first black state attorney general, the legal mastermind behind school desegregation, and hundreds of educators.By the 1950s, Dunbar High School was sending 80 percent of its students to college. Today, as with too many troubled urban public schools, the majority of Dunbar students struggle with reading and math. Journalist and author Alison Stewart, whose parents were both Dunbar graduates, tells the story of the school’s rise, fall, and path toward resurgence as it looks to reopen its new, state-of-the-art campus in the fall of 2013. Read more...
I Ask You, Be Shepherds
I Ask You, Be Shepherds By Pope Francis

Pope Francis has been an engaging, prophetic voice tirelessly calling the church to a simple lifestyle of mercy, witness, and collaboration. This new volume in the Pope Francis Resource Library contains the gems from the Pope's reflections on pastoral and priestly ministry. Authorized by the Vatican, the texts are collected from Pope Francis's homilies, speeches, and papers during the first two years of his papacy, as well as from the earlier, exclusive edition published when he was Archbishop of Buenos Aires. I Ask You, Be Shepherds offers Pope Francis's profound and encouraging appeal to everyone serving God's people today. Read more...
Zombillenium, Vol. 3
Zombillenium, Vol. 3 By Arthur de Pins

There's excitement in the Zombillenium horror themed park run by actual monsters. Brought in by Behemoth himself, the vampire Bohemond Jaggar de Rochambeau IIII is officially supposed to help CEO Francis in managing the park. But the employees expect the worst: isn't he known as a cold-blooded killer? If one looks more closely, the reasons for his coming may seem less anodyne than announced. Of course, his mission is to increase return on investment for the shareholders, but for Behemoth that return has to be in souls. Francis is appalled but obligated to kowtow to the almighty consultant, determined to take power and pervert the rules of Zombillenium. Meanwhile, Aurelian goes through a bad patch. Depressed by his immortal status and the absurdity of his life... sorry, his death, he's burned out. And burnout, in a powerful demon, can be devastating. Held back in extremis by Gretchen, he avoids the worst. This is timely, because Gretchen has a plan for him... A particularly biting new episode of Zombillenium in which we discover the underbelly of the most monstrous amusement park in the world. Read more...
The Last Ship
The Last Ship By Jan Lowe Shinebourne

In a moving novel that charts the fortunes of three generations of a Chinese family in the Caribbean, Jan Lowe Shinebourne explores the power of family myth, the seductiveness of invented traditions, and the way unconscious motivations seeded in painful childhood experience can resurface in adult life. For Joan Wong, growing up in a Chinese family in the political turmoil of 1960s Guyana, family history is never straightforward. There are the examples of her grandmothers—Clarice Chung, iron-willed matriarch who has ensured the family's survival through unremitting toil, with her pride in maintaining racial and cultural identity; and Susan Leo, whose failures have shamed the family, who found comfort from harsh poverty in relationships with two Indian men and adopting an Indian life-style. Later, when Joan Wong makes her own pilgrimage to ancestral China at the turn of the 21st century, there are surprises in store. Read more...
C++ for Kids
C++ for Kids Illustrated by Tom Holmes, By Blaise Vanden-Heuvel, By John C Vanden-Heuvel Sr.

This educational and visual introduction to C++ is a great way to jump start young computer enthusiasts. Simulating the act of programming with easy-to-follow illustrations, this instructional guide makes learning C++ simple and fast for the young, eager beginner. A glossary of terms for quick reference and understanding is included. Whimsical and modern, this book is certain to inspire the new and aspiring programmer. Read more...
The Keeper
The Keeper By Darragh Martin

Ordinary books don't move. Ordinary books are quite happy waiting to be picked up. You could leave an ordinary book somewhere uncomfortable—at the bottom of a dark schoolbag or in the middle of a shop window—and it wouldn't dare budge, even if it had to sneeze. Nobody had told the Book of Magic this, though, so it jumped into Oisín's hands without so much as a flap of its pages.Oisín is not sure he wants to be Keeper of the Book of Magic—but when his little sister Sorcha is kidnapped by the Morrígan, a raven-goddess with a heart as dark as her feathers, he has to learn how to use the Book for good. Soon Oisín has a long journey ahead of him with only Stephen, his annoying older brother, and Antimony, a headstrong orphan with her own quest, to help him. Facing snow snakes, shadow fish, and mountains of wind, the three children have to decide whether or not they can trust each other—and the mysterious Book that's leading them—if they want to reach the Morrígan's Hill of Bones before it's too late to get the last ever train home. This thrilling Celtic fantasy is perfect for fans of J. K. Rowling, Eoin Colfer, and J. R. R. Tolkien. A map and a glossary are included.
The End of the World Is Rye
The End of the World Is Rye By Brett Cottrell

What would you do for the perfect sandwich? Kill? Die? Well, if you were a rogue angel, you might cause the Apocalypse. And it looks like that's just what this darkly funny fantasy's rogue angel is about to do when he lands in a polygamist cult in Utah. Now it's up to the rest of God's divine posse, including Jesus and Lucifer, to save all of existence from certain destruction. In his debut novel, Brett Cottrell takes you on a provocative, celestial roller coaster ride that will have you laughing on the edge of your seat all the way to the gates of Hell. Read more...
The Complete Muhammad Ali
The Complete Muhammad Ali By Ishmael Reed

Including material and photographs not included in most of the 100 other books about the champion, Ishmael Reed's The Complete Muhammad Ali is more than just a biography—it is a fascinating portrait of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st. An honest, balanced portrayal of Ali, the book includes voices that have been omitted from other books. It charts Ali's evolution from Black Nationalism to a universalism, but does not discount the Nation of Islam and Black Nationalism's important influence on his intellectual development. Filipino American author Emil Guillermo speaks about how "The Thrilla' In Manila" brought the Philippines into the 20th century. Fans of Muhammad Ali, boxing fans, and those interested in modern African American history and the Nation of Islam will be fascinated by this biography by an accomplished American author. Read more...
She Takes a Stand
She Takes a Stand By Michael Elsohn Ross

Portraits of brave women from the late 1800s through today—role models who are passionate about important issues. A source of inspiration for young women with strong social convictions, She Takes a Stand highlights 16 extraordinary women who have fought for human rights, civil rights, workers' rights, reproductive/sexual rights, and world peace. Among these are many who have been imprisoned, threatened, or suffered financial hardships for pursuing their missions to change the world for the better. Included are historic heroes such as anti-lynching crusader Ida B. Wells and suffragist Alice Paul, along with contemporary figures such as girls-education activist Malala Yousafzai; Sampat Pal Devi, who fights violence against Indian women; and SPARK executive director Dana Edell, who works to end the sexualization of women and girls in the media. Taking a multicultural, multinational perspective, She Takes a Stand spotlights brave women around the world with an emphasis on childhood details, motivations, and life turning points—in many cases gleaned from the author's original interviews—and includes related sidebars, a bibliography, source notes, and a list of organizations young women can explore to get involved in changing their world. Read more...
Magna Carta in 20 Places
Magna Carta in 20 Places By Derek J. Taylor

The only book to tell Magna Carta's story through places associated with it, through England and France to the United States. The Magna Carta has undergone an extraordinary journey from the palaces and villages of England, through the castles and towns of France, via the Middle East, and ending in the United States today. Along the way, the book dispels the popular notions that King John was an unredeemed tyrant, the baron's champions of civil liberty, and that Magna Carta was the foundation of democracy and universal freedom. The true story is much more intriguing than a simple fiction of good defeating evil, and the author tries to answer one of the great mysteries about the Charter: why today is it much more enthusiastically revered in America than it is in the country of its origin? But myths can be powerful. And the account of how this largely technical medieval document became an inspiration to those who have struggled over centuries to win democracy and freedom under the law reveals a great deal about our need for symbols and our inclination to believe what we want to believe. Read more...
Ziggyology By Simon Goddard

From the author of the acclaimed Mozipedia, a work of supreme pop archaeology unearths every influence that brought Ziggy to life, from H. G. Wells to Holst, Kabuki to Kubrick, and Elvis to Iggy. The most ambitious and important book on Ziggy Stardust ever written, this study documents the epic drama of the Starman's short but eventful time on Planet Earth, and why Bowie eventually had to kill him. It was the greatest invention in the history of pop music—the rock god who came from the stars—which struck a young David Bowie like a lightning bolt from the heavens. When Ziggy the glam alien messiah fell to Earth, he transformed Bowie from a prodigy to a superstar who changed the face of music forever. But who was Ziggy Stardust? And where did he really come from? Beautifully packaged, this will be a must-have artifact for Bowie fans. Read more...
French Riviera and Its Artists
French Riviera and Its Artists By John Baxter

Get swept up in the glitz and glamour of the French Riviera as author and filmmaker John Baxter takes readers on a whirlwind tour through the star-studded cultural history of the Côte d'Azur that's sure to delight travelers, Francophiles, and culture lovers alike. Readers will discover the dramatic lives of the legendary artists, writers, actors, and politicians who frequented the world's most luxurious resort during its golden age. In 25 vivid chapters, Baxter introduces the iconic figures indelibly linked to the South of France—artist Henri Matisse, who lived in Nice for much of his life; F. Scott Fitzgerald, whose Riviera hosts inspired his controversial Tender is the Night; Coco Chanel, who made the Saint-Tropez tan an international fashion statement; and many more. Along the way, Baxter takes readers where few people ever get to go: the alluring world of the perfume industry, into the cars and casinos of Monte Carlo, behind-the-scenes at the Cannes Film Festival, to the villa where Picasso and Cocteau smoked opium, and to the hotel where Joseph Kennedy had an affair with Marlene Dietrich. Then maps and listings show travelers how these luminaries celebrated life and made art amid paradise. Read more...
Dream of Venice
Dream of Venice Photographs By Charles Christopher, Edited by JoAnn Locktov, Foreword by Frances Mayes

The mysterious allure of the ancient floating city of Venice is captured in this book of evocative photography and beguiling words of a diverse group of contemporary Venetophiles. The luminous photographs, in both color and black and white, compliment the intimate thoughts, memories, poems, and stories of notable contributors from the worlds of art, literature, design, cuisine, music, and filmmaking. Readers will want to listen to the silence of the canals and get lost in the ethereal mist of Piazza San Marco. Included are anecdotes and Venetian recollections from Woody Allen, Julie Christie, Diane Hales, Marcella Hazan, Erica Jong, Judith Martin, Linus Roache, and Nicolas Roeg. Read more...
The Mickey Mantle Murder
The Mickey Mantle Murder By Walt Brown

The 1952 Mickey Mantle baseball card is a treasured artifact: the iconic card, depending on condition, can sell for up to half a million dollars. In The Mickey Mantle Murder, the card is the centerpiece of an international geopolitical murder. The novel details the investigation into the theft of the card and the disappearance of "Pete Rizzoli," a well-known, flamboyant, and frequently abrasive sports collectible dealer whose worth is in the tens of millions. How did Rizzoli go missing? Who was clever enough to make his disappearance succeed? What unknown protocols did the criminals use to succeed in their endeavor? This unique murder mystery, set in the world of sports memorabilia collecting, features an earthy detective out to solve the case. Read more...
Exhilarating Prose
Exhilarating Prose By Barry Healey, By Cordelia Strube

This smartly illustrated literary miscellanea is intended to stimulate readers and writers of English prose. From "dead language – the speaks" (i.e., ad-speak, media-speak, corporate-speak) through "re-writing – Again?" to rules (to obey or not to obey), authors Barry Healey and Cordelia Strube examine what makes good and bad writing. With tongue often in cheek, they scrutinize various forms of prose and the seven major prose elements, and reflect on how to approach the writing process most effectively. Exhilarating Prose also abounds with examples of startling writing, wide-ranging quotes from celebrated authors, and their own ruminations on the oddities of writing and the infinite eccentricity of the human mind. To those interested in English words "in their best order" (Coleridge), this book will inform, engage, and amuse. Read more...
Very British Problems
Very British Problems By Rob Temple

There's an epidemic sweeping the nation Symptoms include: Acute embarrassment at the mere notion of 'making a fuss,' Extreme awkwardness when faced with any social greeting beyond a brisk handshake, An unhealthy preoccupation with meteorology. Doctors have also reported several cases of unnecessary apologising, an obsessive interest in correct queuing etiquette and dramatic sighing in the presence of loud teenagers on public transport. If you have experienced any of these symptoms, you may be suffering from VERY BRITISH PROBLEMS. VERY BRITISH PROBLEMS are highly contagious. There is no known cure. Rob Temple's hilarious new book reveals all the ways in which we are a nation of socially awkward but well-meaning oddballs, struggling to make it through every day without apologising to an inanimate object. Take comfort in misfortunes of others. You are not alone. Read more...
Exploring the Titanic
Exploring the Titanic By Robert D. Ballard

A century after the great ship sank to the ocean floor, the Titanic still captivates the imagination. More than just a collection of the superlative facts associated with the ship —largest, tallest, fastest—Robert Ballard's Exploring the Titanic tells the tale of the doomed ocean liner through the eyes of those who lived the tragedy and those who discovered the ship 74 years later. The book is brought to life with dozens of engaging illustrations by renowned artist Ken Marschall. Read more...
The Hermione
The Hermione By Emmanuel de Fontainieu, Foreword by Henry Kissinger, Introduction by Ségolène Royal

Enhanced by illustrations, maps, and letters this book provides a museum quality experience with detailed descriptions of the thrilling accomplishments of Lafayette and his legendary warship in support of the colonists' cause during the American Revolutionary War, with fascinating insights into the building of the arsenal in Rochefort under Louis XIV and Colbert, development of the French navy, eighteenth-century naval strategy, and shipbuilding techniques. Lafayette, on a secret mission from King Louis XVI, was to inform George Washington and the Congress that France would support the American colonies in their conflict with Great Britain. Once on American soil, Lafayette shed his diplomatic role for an important military assignment, helping to mastermind the decisive Virginia campaign that brought hostilities to an end. While Lafayette excelled on the battlefield, his ship, L'Hermione, was burnishing its own legend as part of the crucial maneuvers that led to the defeat of the much larger British navy and ensured the American victory. Also profiled is the ambitious undertaking of the nearly two decades long project to meticulously re-create L'Hermione and prepare it for a new transatlantic voyage, again on a mission of friendship and goodwill. Read more...
Pickles Preserves and Cures
Pickles Preserves and Cures By Thane Prince

Many cooks remember jams and chutneys made by grandmothers and great aunts who also seemed to know exactly how long to boil a ham and how to keep butter, and who had a magical pantry full of secret delights. These skills are increasingly in demand as more people want to make use of homegrown produce, reduce the weekly food budget, or rediscover cooking from scratch. A timely book for the new kitchen revolution, this is not only a celebration of lost skills such as curing, rendering, and pickling and a collection of fantastic recipes (such as Roasted Brine-cured Pork, Green Tomato Chutney, and Salted Peanut Brittle), but also provides advice on stocking a pantry and the best way to store cheese, cooked meats, and vegetables. At a time when everyone is looking to shop more locally, cook thriftily, and still enjoy great food, it is a book for how to live today. Recipes include dual measurements. Read more...
The Insatiable Maw
The Insatiable Maw By Mick Lowe

In this story of eco-resistance based on actual events in the heart of Canada's Nickel Range, Jake McCool, the injured hardrock miner, returns to work for the International Nickel Company (INCO) but now at its nearby Copper Cliff smelter complex. In no time, Jake finds himself embroiled in a vicious fight over health and safety and, more specifically, over the extreme levels of sulphur dioxide that poison the air in the smelter but also in the entire surrounding area. The fight takes on new dimensions as freelance reporter Foley Gilpin sparks interest at Canada's national daily Globe & Mail and as local parliamentarian Harry Wardell smells the collusion between INCO and the highest levels of Ministry of Natural Resources at Queen's Park in Toronto. Read more...
Thin Blue Smoke
Thin Blue Smoke By Doug Worgul

This title is an epic American redemption tale about love and loss, hope and despair, God and whiskey, barbecue and the blues. LaVerne Williams is a ruined ex-big league ballplayer, an ex-felon with an attitude problem, and the owner of a barbecue joint he has to run. Ferguson Glen is an Episcopal priest, a fading literary star with a drinking problem, and a past he is running from. A.B. Clayton and Sammy Merzeti are two lost souls in need of love, understanding, and another cigarette. Hilarious and heart-rending, sacred and profane, this book marks the emergence of a vital new voice in American fiction. Read more...
In the All-Night Café
In the All-Night Café By Stuart David

Determined to make his living writing stories and songs, Stuart had spent several years scraping by on the dole in his small, industrial hometown. Then he had the fateful idea to learn bass guitar, and to head for Glasgow in search of likeminded artists. In the All-Night Café describes his fortuitous meeting with the group's cofounder Stuart Murdoch in a course for unemployed musicians. It tells of their adventures in two early incarnations of Belle and Sebastian and culminates in the recordingof their celebrated debut album, Tigermilk. This portrait of the group and its origins will resonate with anyone who has put together—or thought of putting together—a band. It is a story of a group of friends who wanted to create a different kind of music, and how—against all expectations—they succeeded. Written with wit, affection, and a novelist's observant eye, In the All-Night Café brings to life the early days of this most enigmatic and intriguing of bands. Read more...
The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm
The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm By LeVar Burton, By Susan Schaefer Bernardo, Illustrated by Courtenay Fletcher

This week in 1983, the very first episode of Reading Rainbow, hosted by LeVar Burton, aired on television. Read more on the Reading Rainbow Blog.
How to Chat Someone Up at a Funeral
How to Chat Someone Up at a Funeral By Mark Leigh

Most etiquette guides will tell you the proper way to eat asparagus or the correct way to address a dignitary—but they fail abysmally when it comes to offering advice on any number of awkward social situations. Containing guidance and tips for dealing with more than 60 such scenarios, this book is completely non-judgemental. How (and why) you might find yourself in any of these circumstances is immaterial; the book is concerned with presenting the best way to conduct yourself so you leave the situation with your dignity (and sometimes your life) intact. Modern dilemmas covered include challenging a co-worker to a duel, disposing of a dead body, assuming someone's pregnant when they are not, inadvertently farting in the presence of the Queen of England, and disarming an axe-wielding maniac. Read more...
Giant Splash
Giant Splash By Andrew Baggarly

Since the team moved to the shores of McCovey Cove in 2000, Giants fans have been thrilled by iconic players, historic moments, and heroic performances—not to mention three World Series championships. Giant Splash takes readers onto the field and inside the clubhouse for every unforgettable moment: Barry Bonds' record-setting home runs, Tim Lincecum's no-hitter, Matt Cain's perfect game, Travis Ishikawa's walk-off pennant winner, and many more. Read more...
Fallen Angels
Fallen Angels By Jack Vettriano, Edited by W. Gordon Smith

Painter Jack Vettriano emerged from the unlikely background of the Scottish coalfields, unknown and untutored, and has seen his canvases hung in the Royal Scottish Academy, eventually becoming Scotland's most successful and controversial contemporary artist, his painting The Singing Butler selling for close to $1.2 million. This collection presents, alongside more than 40 Jack Vettriano paintings, stories, poems, dialogue from plays, and other fine examples of Scottish writing. W. Gordon Smith, playwright and art critic, has woven an anthology of new and old writing around the painter's images, complementing them, matching their moods, and extending the lives of his characters beyond their frozen moments on canvas. Some of Scotland's most accomplished writers have accepted the challenge to put their imagination into free fall and, by interpreting Vettriano's paintings in such diverse ways, plunder some of their mysteries and perhaps go some way towards explaining their unique appeal. Read more...
Style Is Eternal
Style Is Eternal By Nicole Jenkins

Answering the question, "How can I have so many clothes, yet still have nothing to wear?" Style Is Eternal provides you with the tools to transform your wardrobe from faddish to stylish. Nicole Jenkins shares her experience as a fashion buyer and stylist to navigate the essential additions to your wardrobe without breaking the bank, use accessories to create new outfits, convert your fashion faux pas into chic statements, and travel with only hand luggage and still look classy. Nicole reveals her tricks of the trade: how to make the most of your body shape, how to create an authentic look, when to combine classic staples with more contemporary fashionable pieces, how to avoid those regrettable and expensive impulse buys, how to have a wardrobe that will cover all your work and lifestyle options, and practical tips on caring for your clothes. Style Is Eternal is a beautiful step-by-step guide to understand and integrate fashion basics, classics, and trends into a personalized signature look. It will encourage dressing with confidence and creativity. Read more...
How I Rescued My Brain
How I Rescued My Brain By David Roland

As a forensic psychologist, David Roland often saw the toughest, most heartbreaking cases. The emotional trauma had begun to take its toll, and then the global financial crisis hit, leaving his family facing financial ruin. When he found himself in an emergency ward with little idea of how he got there, doctors wondered if he'd had a nervous breakdown. Eventually they discovered the truth: David had suffered a stroke, which had resulted in brain injury. He faced two choices: give up or get his brain working again. Drawing on the principles of neuroplasticity, David set about rewiring his brain. He embarked on a search that brought him into contact with doctors, neuroscientists, yoga teachers, musicians, and a Buddhist nun, and found the tools to restore his sense of self through psychotherapy, swimming, music, mindfulness, and meditation. This is the story of David's neurological difficulties and of his remarkable cognitive recovery. It is also an account of a journey to emotional health. How I Rescued My Brain is an amazing tale of one man's resilience and his determination to overcome one of the most frightening situations imaginable—the fear that he had lost his mind and might not get it back. Read more...
Protecting Others
Protecting Others By Jim Wagner

Addressing simple yet powerfully effective methods of self-defense, this guide teaches how to best deal with dangerous situations. With detailed photo sequences, helpful captions, and clear illustrations that depict the proper way to do drills, it uses a variety of scenarios, such as home invasion, street crime, terrorism, bank robberies, and even grenade attack, to show the best ways to keep loved ones and other third parties safe while defusing the situation as quickly and peacefully as possible. With chapters that discuss victim rescue, vehicle security, bodyguard basics, and how to survive a variety of weapon attacks, this is the authoritative self-defense manual for everyone from the professional soldier to the civilian. Read more...
The Hard Sell
The Hard Sell By Dee Madigan

What is unique about political advertising? Is it really all that effective in changing votes? Why does it have to be so annoying? In The Hard Sell, creative director Dee Madigan uses her trademark humor and down-to-earth approach to unveil the world of political advertising. Drawing on real-life stories from her own recent federal and state campaigns in Australia, she gives fascinating industry insight into how political ads are designed to work; who they are meant to influence; how they are paid for; why so many negative ads are made; how personal is too personal; how spin works, particularly in an election campaigns; how to make messages cut through cynicism; how politicians use journalists; and the gendered nature of it all. The author is candid about the tricks of the trade and the lessons that can be learned. Read more...
Rebel Priest in the Time of Tyrants
Rebel Priest in the Time of Tyrants By Claude Lacaille, Foreword by Miguel d'Escoto, M. M., Translated by Casey Roberts

Claude Lacaille witnessed up close the oppression and poverty in Haiti, Ecuador, and Chile where dictators and predatory imperialists ruled. Like other advocates of Liberation Theology, he saw it as his duty to join the resistance, particularly against Chilean military dictator Augusto Pinochet. But the dictators were not alone, as they often enjoyed the support of the Vatican, sometimes tacit, but then brazenly open under Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI. He began writing this book in Chile where thousands shed blood simply because they defended victims of dictatorship, opposed rapacious policies and economic doctrines, consoled the downtrodden, and breathed new hope and courage into a people who desperately needed it. These men and women remain an inspiration for those who still believe in a better world. This is the story of Claude Lacaille's experience from 1965 through 1986 in the slums and squats in the Caribbean and South America and also what it really means to have a preferential option for the poor. His book shows how liberation theology and spirituality enkindled the life and the work of an ordinary Quebec missionary. Read more...
2016 Nantucket Calendar
2016 Nantucket Calendar Photographs By Charles Fields

Breathtaking and beautiful, this 12-month calendar is designed with awe-inspiring, professionally photographed landscapes of the picturesque island of Nantucket. Marked with all major holidays and moon phases, this essential tool has ample room to note appointments, meetings, and special events. Capturing the exceptional core of an island whose population swells to nearly five times its size in the summer months, this calendar makes a handsome addition to the walls of island dwellers and visitors alike. Read more...
Mob Cop
Mob Cop By Fred Pascente, By Sam Reaves

Former Chicago police officer and Outfit associate Fred Pascente is the man who links Tony Spilotro, a central character in Nicholas Pileggi's Casino and one of Chicago's most notori­ous mob figures, to William Hanhardt, chief of detectives of the Chicago Police Department. Pascente and Spilotro grew up together on Chicago's Near West Side, and as young toughs they were rousted and shaken down by Hanhardt. While Spilotro became one of the youngest made men in Chicago Outfit history, Pascente was draft­ed into the army and then joined the police department. Soon taken under Hanhardt's wing, Pascente served as Hanhardt's fixer and bagman on the department for more than a decade. At the same time, Pascente remained close to Spilotro, mak­ing frequent trips to Las Vegas to party with his old friend while helping to rob the casinos blind. As a policeman he led a double life, doing genuine police work un­der Hanhardt's tutelage while at the same time keeping an eye out for opportunities for bribery and theft. His position on both sides of the law gave him unrivaled knowl­edge of the workings of Chicago's deeply rooted culture of corruption. Mob Cop details the decline of tra­ditional organized crime in the United States, and reveals information about the inner workings of the Outfit that has never been publicly released. Fred Pascente's col­orful stories of crooked cops and danger­ous criminals make his memoir a matchless tell-all. Read more...
Big Top Burning
Big Top Burning By Laura A. Woollett

Thousands of men, women, and children were crowded under Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey's big top watching the Flying Wallendas begin their death-defying high-wire act. Suddenly someone screamed "Fire!" and the panic began. By 2:50 the tent had burned to the ground. Not everyone had made it out alive. With primary source documents and survivor interviews, Big Top Burning recounts the true story of the 1944 Hartford circus fire—one of the worst fire disasters in U.S. history. Its remarkable characters include Robert Segee, a 15-year-old circus roustabout and known pyromaniac, and the Cook children, Donald, Eleanor, and Edward, who were in the audience when the circus tent caught fire. Guiding readers through the investigations of the mysteries that make this moment in history so fascinating, this book asks: Was the unidentified body of a little girl nicknamed "Little Miss 1565" Eleanor Cook? Was the fire itself an act of arson—and did Robert Segee set it? Big Top Burning combines a gripping disaster story, an ongoing detective and forensics saga, and World War II–era American history, inviting middle-grades readers to take part in a critical evaluation of the evidence and draw their own conclusions. Read more...
Jennifer's Journal
Jennifer's Journal By Jennifer Crute

By turns funny, poignant, melancholic, and life-affirming, Jennifer's Journal: The Life of a SubUrban Girl is a graphic memoir that chronicles the life of a quirky, petite, freckled-faced African American illustrator and artist. The journal depicts Jennifer's struggles with work, depression, sex and sexuality, and religion while poking fun at the stereotypes she encounters along the way. Featuring a host of colorful characters—from grumpy family members to gossipy schoolmates to New York City archetypes like the nosy neighbor or the guy selling raw oxtails at the Laundromat—it is an entertaining and humorous look at life with awkward insights from Jennifer's close friends as well as from her imaginary companions: the meditative Miss Buddha Bear, her nemesis Mean Mama, and the rest of her tyrannical friends. Each of these characters shape Jennifer's ability to maintain peace of mind while battling the insane stereotypes around race, class, and gender contained in mainstream and popular culture. It's a story that will resonate with anyone who grew up feeling like an outsider. Read more...
100 Things Avengers Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die
100 Things Avengers Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die By Dan Casey

With extensive backstories and comic lore, this lively, detailed book explores the characters, storylines, and facts every Avengers fan should know. This guide covers the history of how the group went from Justice League knockoff to billion-dollar franchise; the history of Ultron, Thanos, and the Infinity Gauntlet; and the series' seminal storylines, writers, and artists. It includes information on everyone's favorite Avengers, including Iron Man, Thor, Hulk, Captain America, Hawkeye, and Black Widow, as well as members of the Secret Avengers and the New Avengers. Author Daniel Casey has collected every essential piece of Avengers knowledge and trivia, including why the Avengers went out for shawarma, as well as must-do activities, such as how to make the most of your Comic-Con experience and how to properly preserve your comic book collection, and ranks them all, providing an entertaining and easy-to-follow checklist for fans of all ages. Read more...
Harold and Maude
Harold and Maude By Colin Higgins

Nineteen-year-old Harold Chasen is obsessed with death. He fakes suicides to shock his self-obsessed mother, drives a hearse, and attends funerals of complete strangers. Seventy-nine-year-old Maude Chardin, on the other hand, adores life. She liberates trees from city sidewalks and transplants them to the forest, paints smiles on the faces of church statues, and "borrows" cars to remind their owners that life is fleeting—here today, gone tomorrow! A chance meeting between the two turns into a madcap, whirlwind romance, and Harold learns that life is worth living, and how to play the banjo. Harold and Maude started as Colin Higgins's master's thesis at UCLA film school before being made into the 1971 film directed by Hal Ashby. The quirky, dark comedy gained a loyal cult following, and in 1997 it was selected for inclusion on the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress. Higgins's novelization was released with the original film but has been out of print for more than thirty years. Fans who have seen the movie dozens of times will find this a valuable companion, as it gives fresh elements to watch for and answers many of the film's unresolved questions. Read more...
By Trolley Past Thimbledon Bridge
By Trolley Past Thimbledon Bridge By Ashley Bryan, Illustrated by Marvin Bileck

This picture book takes children of all ages on a trolley-ride dream adventure. Featuring the extraordinary illustrations of Caldecott Honoree, Marvin Bileck, this book is a dream caught on paper with the sense of magic and wonder and unfettered imagination of a child. As sleep starts the journey into the blue, marvelous threads unravel dreamy images out of the blue revealing animals, far-off places, a circus, games, toys, wind, rain, a touch of this and a touch of that, words and wordplay. A poem accompanies the whimsical illustrations, perfectly capturing the sense of awe and excitement of childhood. With the eyes of a child, or simply the heart of a child, this book invites you into a dream world, an allegory, a journey. Read more...

Bowie on Bowie
Bowie on Bowie Edited by Sean Egan

Bowie on Bowie presents some of the best interviews David Bowie has granted in his near five-decade career. Each featured interview traces a new step in his unique journey, successively freezing him in time in all of his various incarnations, from a young novelty hit-maker and Ziggy Stardust to plastic soul player, 1980s sell-out, and the artistically reborn and beloved elder statesman of challenging popular music. In all of these iterations he is remarkably articulate and also preternaturally polite as almost every interviewer remarks upon his charm. The features in this book come from outlets both prestigious—Melody Maker, MOJO, New Musical Express, Q, Rolling Stone—and less well-known—the Drummer, Guitar, Ikon, Mr. Showbiz—but no matter the renown of the magazine, newspaper, or website, Bowie lets us approach the nerve center of his notoriously creative output. Read more...

Book of Tripe
Book of Tripe By Stephane Reynaud, Photographs By Marie-Pierre Morel, Illustrated by José Reis de Matos

The highly acclaimed author of French Feasts and Pork & Sons explains what to do with gizzards, kidneys, feet, brains, tails, and all the restFrom much-loved chef Stéphane Reynaud comes an extensive collection of nose to tail recipes combining responsible eating with delicious cuisine. Stéphane's recipes showcase everything from traditional dishes to more modern fare including Chicken Liver Soufflés, Pig Trotter and Dandelion Salad, Lamb's Liver and Caramelised Apples, Sweetbreads with Cream, Pan-fried Duck Hearts with Ginger, Peppered Brain Fritters, and Curried Pork Cheeks among many others. This charmingly presented book will allay your prejudices and give you the perfect introduction to the world of tripe. Recipes include dual measurements. Read more...

Atlanta: Then and Now®
Atlanta: Then and Now® By Michael Rose

Archive images from Atlanta's early days, when it was known as the "Gate City," are paired with the same view today, as the bustling capital of the New SouthAtlanta blends the old-Southern charm and hospitality of its history with the energy of the modern millennial city. Staked out in the 1837 wilderness of northeast Georgia, the site that became Atlanta was identified as the termination point for the as-yet unbuilt railroad line. Since that time, transportation has been key to the city's growth, from its declaration as the Gate City of the South in 1857, its prominence as a distribution center during the Civil War, to its current designation as home of the nation's busiest airport. At the end of the 19th century, Atlanta presented itself to the world in a grand international exposition; it closed the next century by bringing the world to Atlanta as it hosted the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Throughout this drive from rural terminal to urban metropolis, Atlanta has witnessed incredible growth. The scenes in this book document this change as the city's tree-lined avenues and country crossroads gave way to high-rises, busy city intersections, and community growth. Atlanta: Then and Now is a captivating chronicle of history and change since the dawn of the camera age. It pairs historic photographs, many more than a century old, with specially commissioned views of the same scene as it exists today to show the evolution of Atlanta from its early years to the very different city that it is today. Sites include: Ellis, Hunter, Alabama, Marietta, Peachtree and Decatur Streets, Train Gulch, Cabbage Town, Inman Park, Georgian Terrace, Terminal Station, The Castle, and Margaret Mitchell Square Read more...
Arctic Crime and Punishment
Arctic Crime and Punishment By Kenn Harper

In this latest edition in the In Those Days: Collected Writings on Arctic History series, Kenn Harper shares the tales of murderers, thieves, and fraudsters, as well as the wrongfully accused, in the early days of Northern colonization. In the 19th and 20th centuries, settler and Inuit ideas of justice clashed, leading to some of the most unusual trials and punishments in history. Included in this collection are the stories of criminals and victims, both southern and Inuit, and of the difficulties of finding justice in a land that was rapidly changing. Read more...

Code Name Pauline
Code Name Pauline By Pearl Witherington Cornioley, Edited by Kathryn Atwood

There was a full moon on the evening of September 22, 1943, when Pearl Witherington, age 29, parachuted into France to aid the French Resistance as a special agent for the British Special Operations Executive (SOE). Out of the 400 agents sent to France during the German occupation, 39 were women. Pearl, whom the SOE called "cool and resourceful and extremely determined" and "the best shot, male or female, we have yet had," became one of the most celebrated female World War II resistance fighters.In Code Name Pauline Pearl describes in a series of plainspoken reminiscences her difficult childhood and harrowing escape from France in 1940; her recruitment and training as a special agent; the logistics and dangers of posing as a cosmetics saleswoman to make her way around the country as an undercover courier; and both failed and successful attempts at sabotaging the Nazis. She tells how, when the leader of her network was caught by the Gestapo, she became "Pauline" and rose to command a 3,500-strong band of French Resistance fighters. With an annotated list of key figures, an appendix of original unedited interview extracts—including Pearl's husband Henri's story—and never-before-published photographs from Pearl's personal collection, Code Name Pauline will captivate World War II buffs of any age and, just as Pearl wished, inspire young people. Read more...
Playing as if the World Mattered
Playing as if the World Mattered By Gabriel Kuhn

The world of sports is often associated with commercialism, corruption, and reckless competition. Liberals have objected to sport being used for political propaganda, and leftists have decried its role in distracting the masses from the class struggle. Yet, since the beginning of organized sports, athletes, fans, and officials have tried to administer and play it in ways that strengthen, rather than hinder, progressive social change. From the workers' sports movement in the early 20th century to the civil rights struggle transforming sports in the 1960s to the current global network of grassroots sports clubs, there has been a glowing desire to include sports in the struggle for liberation and social justice. With the help of numerous full-color illustrations—from posters and leaflets to paintings and photographs—Playing as if the World Mattered makes this history tangible and introduces an understanding of sports beyond chauvinistic jingoism, corporate-media chat rooms, and multibillion-dollar business deals. Read more...
Ghetto Brother
Ghetto Brother By Julian Voloj, Illustrated by Claudia Ahlering, Introduction by Jeff Chang

An engrossing and counter view of one of the most dangerous elements of American urban history, this graphic novel tells the true story of Benjy Melendez, a Bronx legend, son of Puerto-Rican immigrants, who founded, at the end of the 1960s, the notorious Ghetto Brothers gang. From the seemingly bombed-out ravages of his neighborhood, wracked by drugs, poverty, and violence, he managed to extract an incredibly positive energy from this riot ridden era: his multiracial gang promoted peace rather than violence. After initiating a gang truce, the Ghetto Brothers held weekly concerts on the streets or in abandoned buildings, which fostered the emergence of hip-hop. Melendez also began to reclaim his Jewish roots after learning about his family's dramatic crypto-Jewish background. Read more...
Hoodwinked! By Kanbar Entertainment

The classic tale of Little Red Riding Hood gets a modern twist and turns into a wild-and-crazy detective story in this CGI animated family film and book. When The Big Bad Wolf breaks into Granny's house and accosts Red, the Woodsman attempts to save the little girl. Once the investigation starts, we get two very different stories about what happened. What was once a simple domestic disturbance case quickly unravels into a conspiracy of vast proportions. As the laugh-filled tale unfolds, we learn that the truth isn't always what it seems, and even the most guilty-seeming creatures can sometimes be the most innocent. Read more...
A Sorcerer's Apprentice
A Sorcerer's Apprentice By John Herlosky

Follow the fascinating story of one man's journey into the realm of the fantastic: the CIA-sponsored psychic spies with the ability to extend their consciousness to accurately describe targets not only half a world away but to look into the future as well. It all sounded like science fiction to John Herlosky after reading an expose by former member of the CIA's Project Stargate, Dr. David Morehouse. Two years later, skeptical but intrigued by the possibilities implied, John entered the classroom of Dr. Morehouse to find out the truth—and never looked back. Sorcerer's Apprentice is an autobiographical account of the author's experience learning the CIA-sponsored scientifically validated form of extrasensory perception called "remote viewing." The book chronicles the author's journey from interested skeptic to operational remote viewer working his first mission as well as his former life as a police officer and private military contractor. He takes you on a journey from the crushing depths and pathos of the wreck of the Titanic to the fate of a downed pilot missing for 19 years from the first Gulf War. Witness the personal turmoil as the author's long-held beliefs clash with the powerful implications of his experiences. Read more...
Barry Louis Polisar's a Little Different
Barry Louis Polisar's a Little Different By Barry Polisar

Children will be delighted by the wry, sly, and witty lyrics of Barry Louis Polisar. This recording includes 17 songs with musical homages to Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, the Native American a capella group Ulali, and other artists. It features 45 minutes of songs such as a blues version of “I’m a Slug,” a joyful song called “Potty Training,” and the song “Homemade Band,” in which Barry uses everyday kitchen utensils as instruments. He is joined by Ray Tilkens and his various instruments, which give this recording a textured and original sound. Read more...
Strangers in the Bronx
Strangers in the Bronx By Andrew O'Toole, Foreword by Marty Appel

Rare is the athlete who captures the imagination of a generation. In Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle, sports culture had two such figures. Undoubtedly, DiMaggio and Mantle are two of the most revered names in baseball literature. However, there is one particular moment that has been overlooked by baseball historians and writers: the 1951 pennant-winning New York Yankees team—DiMaggio's last year and Mantle's rookie season. For that one year, the paths of these two baseball icons converged, the naissance of Mantle's career poignantly juxtaposed with the slow descent of DiMaggio's final season. Strangers in the Bronx is more than a chronicle of a World Series–winning team, it is also a study of heroes: the decline of an all-too mortal American icon and the emergence of the newest sensation in sport. Read more...
Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant
Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant By Scott Barnett

Written in a cinematic style, this book is about the creation, growth, and sale of the Bubba Gump Shrimp Company. The concept began when Paramount Pictures reached out to see if there was interest in creating a restaurant based on the movie Forrest Gump. It is also the personal story of the author's growth as a CEO and creator of restaurant concepts. A host of situations are described such as restaurant concept creation, high stakes boardroom confrontations, and escaping corrupt officials in foreign lands. The narrative is partly an unvarnished peak behind the everyday scenes of restaurants, movie studios, and Wall Street. There is also an almost step-by-step recounting of how the Bubba Gump concept and others were created and operated. Lessons can be learned on unorthodox methods used in moving from traditional approaches to untried ways of doing business. Read more...
A Delicate Affair on the Western Front
A Delicate Affair on the Western Front By Terrence J. Finnegan

Could the newly arrived American troops be trusted? They were greenhorns, having seen practically no action. The surprise attack at Seicheprey on April 20 was spearheaded by the elite German stormtroopers (Stosstruppen) supported by aircraft, trench mortars, and heavy artillery and was designed as a propaganda coup against the "weak" newcomers. On the edge of the well-named Forêt de Mort Homme, the Connecticut boys of the 102nd regiment bore the brunt. The Americans fell back in disarray in a hell of hand-to-hand fighting; one U.S. cook killed two Germans with his meat cleaver. "A delicate affair" is an actual label applied by one U.S. command report after the battle—and it was an affair with significance beyond its outcome, as the first engagement between U.S. and German forces. Relying entirely on primary sources throughout, the author uses the battle as a jumping-off point to describe how all battles developed in the war, through intelligence (or lack of it) and minute-by-minute command decisions. Read More...
101 Outstanding Graphic Novels
101 Outstanding Graphic Novels By Stephen Weiner, Edited by Daniel J. Fingeroth, Introduction by Ellen Forney

The popular primer on the best graphic novels, initially called The 101 Best Graphic Novels, is back in its third updated edition. Expert librarian Stephen Weiner—with the crowdsourcing help of professionals in the field, from artists to critics to leading comic store owners—has sifted through the bewildering thousands of graphic novels now available to come up with an outstanding, not-to-be-missed 101. With an all-encompassing variety of genres, including both fiction and nonfiction, this serves as a great introduction to this increasingly influential world of pop culture and entertainment while also serving as a reference list for fans on what they may have possibly overlooked. Read More...
Interval By Alice B. Fogel

In this series of poems responding to Johann Sebastian Bach's spectacular "Goldberg Variations," New Hampshire State Poet Laureate Alice B. Fogel has paid homage to a 274-year-old masterpiece and, with the theme of spirit and embodiment that music—and life itself—evoke, has rendered from it a luminous new interpretation. Bach created the Goldbergs' 32 sections using nearly all the styles of western European music at the time; Fogel responds in kind with a range of contemporary poetic styles, including narrative, lyric, and experimental, all confined within the 32-line structure she has borrowed from the composer's 32-bar format. Interval mimics the "baroque" effects of overlapping melodies and harmonies by layering sound, syntax, and sense in multiple voices exploring self, identity, and being. In capturing the essence of this iconic masterpiece, through these poems Fogel has created her own music. Read more...
Tommy Lasorda
Tommy Lasorda By Colin Gunderson, Foreword by Joe Torre

Tommy Lasorda believed that winning wasn't about being the best, but about believing you are the best and that philosophy runs throughout Tommy Lasorda: My Way. Author Colin Gunderson takes readers through Lasorda's days as a player and the manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, including their two World Series Championships in 1981 and 1988. In this book, fans will recall some of their favorite Lasorda anecdotes, and will also be privy to new information and rich background on this national baseball treasure, including memories from an All-Star roster of Dodgers stars.
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life By Marshall B. Rosenberg, Foreword by Arun Gandhi

Do you hunger for skills to improve the quality of your relationships, to deepen your sense of personal empowerment or to simply communicate more effectively? Nonviolent Communication partners practical skills with a powerful consciousness and vocabulary to help you get what you want peacefully. In this internationally acclaimed text, Marshall Rosenberg offers insightful stories, anecdotes, practical exercises and role-plays that will dramatically change your approach to communication for the better.
What the Mystics Know
What the Mystics Know By Richard Rohr

Drawing from the best and most poetic of Richard Rohr's essays from nearly a quarter of a century, each chapter in this new collection examines one of the seven core mystical truths.
PUMPED By The Boston Globe

This ultimate comeback story is recounted in PUMPED, produced by the Boston Globe, which has chronicled the team's fortunes for New England sports fans since the team's inception, and never more thoroughly than in 2014. This 128-page book captures, game-by-game in insightful words and riveting images, the Patriots' indomitable march to their fourth Super Bowl triumph, while also offering perspective on their seven previous visits to football's ultimate spectacle.
Ernie Banks
Ernie Banks By Phil Rogers

Respected by his baseball peers and beloved by Chicago fans and teammates, Ernie Banks did everything there was to do in the game he loved. Everything, that is, except play in a World Series. How and why that experience eluded him during one season of particular promise—1969—is a key storyline of this fresh look at one of baseball's legendary players. The life of Banks, who had picked cotton outside Dallas as a youth, ascended from a barnstorming semipro team to the major leagues after Kansas City Monarchs manager Buck O'Neil placed him with the Cubs, is detailed in this biography of Mr. Cub. During his time in Chicago, Banks won two MVPs and received an education far better than the one he received in the segregated schools he'd attended, gaining important life skills while playing the game he was born to play.
We Love Each Other
We Love Each Other Illustrated by Yusuke Yonezu

A clever and charming board book with an upbeat theme and a special surprise on the last page—a North American debut by a brilliant illustrator Love is everywhere! And it’s not just us humans. From birds to elephants, rabbits to turtles, there is love and togetherness depicted on every page. Very young readers will enjoy the surprises in this cheerfully inventive little book. The bold, colorful illustrations reveal a surprise beneath the flap on every page, with a final delightful surprise on the last page. Read more...
Live Young, Think Young, Be Young
Live Young, Think Young, Be Young By Donald M. Vickery, By Larry Matson, By Carol Vickery

Why do we believe that aging is the cause of most of our problems as we get older? Age and aging actually have much less to do with it than you think. Live Young, Think Young, Be Young challenges our assumptions and beliefs about aging, and provides a fresh, new understanding of how and why we grow old. It will make you think differently about little things in your daily life that accelerate the three “mega” causes of getting old. In the end, this book is about courage and resilience—the courage to change what can be changed and the resilience to accept what can’t be changed. Together, they provide a powerful plan for staying young in body, mind, and spirit. Read more...
Lemistry Edited by Ra Page, Edited by Magda Raczynska

A celebration of Polish science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem, this anthology brings together writers, critics, and scientists who continue to grapple with Lem’s concerns. Featuring short stories, essays, and especially commissioned translations, this account speculates on Lem’s life and vision while delivering brand-new fiction. From computer games (The Sims was inspired by one of his short stories) to films (the red and blue pills of The Matrix owe much to his Futurological Congress), the presence of this masterful writer can be traced far and wide. Contributors include Brian Aldiss, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Mike Nelson, Jacek Dukaj, and more. Read more...
Report from Planet Midnight
Report from Planet Midnight By Nalo Hopkinson

Infused with feminist, Afro-Caribbean views of the science fiction and fantasy genres, this collection of offbeat and highly original works takes aim at race and racism in literature. In “Report from Planet Midnight,” at the International Association of the Fantastic in the Arts, an alien addresses the crowd, evaluating Earth's "strange" customs, including the marginalization of works by nonwhite and female writers. “Message in a Bottle” shows Greg, an American Indian artist, befriending a strange four-year-old who seems wise beyond her years. While preparing an exhibition, he discovers that the young girl is a traveler from the future sent to recover art from the distant past—which apparently includes his own work. Concluding the book with series editor Terry Bisson’s Outspoken Interview, Nalo Hopkinson shares laughs, loves, and top-secret Caribbean spells. Read more...
Christmas Doodle & Colouring Book
Christmas Doodle & Colouring Book By Egmont Books

What does Father Christmas' workshop look like? What are the children building in the snow? It's time to create your own festive doodles and color right through Christmas with this fun doodle and coloring book. With over 100 funny festive doodles to color in and complete, this book is sure to keep any child entertained over the Christmas period. Read more...