New & Notable

Fallen Angels
Fallen Angels By Jack Vettriano, Edited by W. Gordon Smith

Painter Jack Vettriano emerged from the unlikely background of the Scottish coalfields, unknown and untutored, and has seen his canvases hung in the Royal Scottish Academy, eventually becoming Scotland's most successful and controversial contemporary artist, his painting The Singing Butler selling for close to $1.2 million. This collection presents, alongside more than 40 Jack Vettriano paintings, stories, poems, dialogue from plays, and other fine examples of Scottish writing. W. Gordon Smith, playwright and art critic, has woven an anthology of new and old writing around the painter's images, complementing them, matching their moods, and extending the lives of his characters beyond their frozen moments on canvas. Some of Scotland's most accomplished writers have accepted the challenge to put their imagination into free fall and, by interpreting Vettriano's paintings in such diverse ways, plunder some of their mysteries and perhaps go some way towards explaining their unique appeal. Read more...
Style Is Eternal
Style Is Eternal By Nicole Jenkins

Answering the question, "How can I have so many clothes, yet still have nothing to wear?" Style Is Eternal provides you with the tools to transform your wardrobe from faddish to stylish. Nicole Jenkins shares her experience as a fashion buyer and stylist to navigate the essential additions to your wardrobe without breaking the bank, use accessories to create new outfits, convert your fashion faux pas into chic statements, and travel with only hand luggage and still look classy. Nicole reveals her tricks of the trade: how to make the most of your body shape, how to create an authentic look, when to combine classic staples with more contemporary fashionable pieces, how to avoid those regrettable and expensive impulse buys, how to have a wardrobe that will cover all your work and lifestyle options, and practical tips on caring for your clothes. Style Is Eternal is a beautiful step-by-step guide to understand and integrate fashion basics, classics, and trends into a personalized signature look. It will encourage dressing with confidence and creativity. Read more...
How I Rescued My Brain
How I Rescued My Brain By David Roland

As a forensic psychologist, David Roland often saw the toughest, most heartbreaking cases. The emotional trauma had begun to take its toll, and then the global financial crisis hit, leaving his family facing financial ruin. When he found himself in an emergency ward with little idea of how he got there, doctors wondered if he'd had a nervous breakdown. Eventually they discovered the truth: David had suffered a stroke, which had resulted in brain injury. He faced two choices: give up or get his brain working again. Drawing on the principles of neuroplasticity, David set about rewiring his brain. He embarked on a search that brought him into contact with doctors, neuroscientists, yoga teachers, musicians, and a Buddhist nun, and found the tools to restore his sense of self through psychotherapy, swimming, music, mindfulness, and meditation. This is the story of David's neurological difficulties and of his remarkable cognitive recovery. It is also an account of a journey to emotional health. How I Rescued My Brain is an amazing tale of one man's resilience and his determination to overcome one of the most frightening situations imaginable—the fear that he had lost his mind and might not get it back. Read more...
Protecting Others
Protecting Others By Jim Wagner

Addressing simple yet powerfully effective methods of self-defense, this guide teaches how to best deal with dangerous situations. With detailed photo sequences, helpful captions, and clear illustrations that depict the proper way to do drills, it uses a variety of scenarios, such as home invasion, street crime, terrorism, bank robberies, and even grenade attack, to show the best ways to keep loved ones and other third parties safe while defusing the situation as quickly and peacefully as possible. With chapters that discuss victim rescue, vehicle security, bodyguard basics, and how to survive a variety of weapon attacks, this is the authoritative self-defense manual for everyone from the professional soldier to the civilian. Read more...
The Hard Sell
The Hard Sell By Dee Madigan

What is unique about political advertising? Is it really all that effective in changing votes? Why does it have to be so annoying? In The Hard Sell, creative director Dee Madigan uses her trademark humor and down-to-earth approach to unveil the world of political advertising. Drawing on real-life stories from her own recent federal and state campaigns in Australia, she gives fascinating industry insight into how political ads are designed to work; who they are meant to influence; how they are paid for; why so many negative ads are made; how personal is too personal; how spin works, particularly in an election campaigns; how to make messages cut through cynicism; how politicians use journalists; and the gendered nature of it all. The author is candid about the tricks of the trade and the lessons that can be learned. Read more...
Rebel Priest in the Time of Tyrants
Rebel Priest in the Time of Tyrants By Claude Lacaille, Foreword by Miguel d'Escoto, M. M., Translated by Casey Roberts

Claude Lacaille witnessed up close the oppression and poverty in Haiti, Ecuador, and Chile where dictators and predatory imperialists ruled. Like other advocates of Liberation Theology, he saw it as his duty to join the resistance, particularly against Chilean military dictator Augusto Pinochet. But the dictators were not alone, as they often enjoyed the support of the Vatican, sometimes tacit, but then brazenly open under Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI. He began writing this book in Chile where thousands shed blood simply because they defended victims of dictatorship, opposed rapacious policies and economic doctrines, consoled the downtrodden, and breathed new hope and courage into a people who desperately needed it. These men and women remain an inspiration for those who still believe in a better world. This is the story of Claude Lacaille's experience from 1965 through 1986 in the slums and squats in the Caribbean and South America and also what it really means to have a preferential option for the poor. His book shows how liberation theology and spirituality enkindled the life and the work of an ordinary Quebec missionary. Read more...
2016 Nantucket Calendar
2016 Nantucket Calendar Photographs By Charles Fields

Breathtaking and beautiful, this 12-month calendar is designed with awe-inspiring, professionally photographed landscapes of the picturesque island of Nantucket. Marked with all major holidays and moon phases, this essential tool has ample room to note appointments, meetings, and special events. Capturing the exceptional core of an island whose population swells to nearly five times its size in the summer months, this calendar makes a handsome addition to the walls of island dwellers and visitors alike. Read more...
Mob Cop
Mob Cop By Fred Pascente, By Sam Reaves

Former Chicago police officer and Outfit associate Fred Pascente is the man who links Tony Spilotro, a central character in Nicholas Pileggi's Casino and one of Chicago's most notori­ous mob figures, to William Hanhardt, chief of detectives of the Chicago Police Department. Pascente and Spilotro grew up together on Chicago's Near West Side, and as young toughs they were rousted and shaken down by Hanhardt. While Spilotro became one of the youngest made men in Chicago Outfit history, Pascente was draft­ed into the army and then joined the police department. Soon taken under Hanhardt's wing, Pascente served as Hanhardt's fixer and bagman on the department for more than a decade. At the same time, Pascente remained close to Spilotro, mak­ing frequent trips to Las Vegas to party with his old friend while helping to rob the casinos blind. As a policeman he led a double life, doing genuine police work un­der Hanhardt's tutelage while at the same time keeping an eye out for opportunities for bribery and theft. His position on both sides of the law gave him unrivaled knowl­edge of the workings of Chicago's deeply rooted culture of corruption. Mob Cop details the decline of tra­ditional organized crime in the United States, and reveals information about the inner workings of the Outfit that has never been publicly released. Fred Pascente's col­orful stories of crooked cops and danger­ous criminals make his memoir a matchless tell-all. Read more...
Big Top Burning
Big Top Burning By Laura A. Woollett

Thousands of men, women, and children were crowded under Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey's big top watching the Flying Wallendas begin their death-defying high-wire act. Suddenly someone screamed "Fire!" and the panic began. By 2:50 the tent had burned to the ground. Not everyone had made it out alive. With primary source documents and survivor interviews, Big Top Burning recounts the true story of the 1944 Hartford circus fire—one of the worst fire disasters in U.S. history. Its remarkable characters include Robert Segee, a 15-year-old circus roustabout and known pyromaniac, and the Cook children, Donald, Eleanor, and Edward, who were in the audience when the circus tent caught fire. Guiding readers through the investigations of the mysteries that make this moment in history so fascinating, this book asks: Was the unidentified body of a little girl nicknamed "Little Miss 1565" Eleanor Cook? Was the fire itself an act of arson—and did Robert Segee set it? Big Top Burning combines a gripping disaster story, an ongoing detective and forensics saga, and World War II–era American history, inviting middle-grades readers to take part in a critical evaluation of the evidence and draw their own conclusions. Read more...
Jennifer's Journal
Jennifer's Journal By Jennifer Crute

By turns funny, poignant, melancholic, and life-affirming, Jennifer's Journal: The Life of a SubUrban Girl is a graphic memoir that chronicles the life of a quirky, petite, freckled-faced African American illustrator and artist. The journal depicts Jennifer's struggles with work, depression, sex and sexuality, and religion while poking fun at the stereotypes she encounters along the way. Featuring a host of colorful characters—from grumpy family members to gossipy schoolmates to New York City archetypes like the nosy neighbor or the guy selling raw oxtails at the Laundromat—it is an entertaining and humorous look at life with awkward insights from Jennifer's close friends as well as from her imaginary companions: the meditative Miss Buddha Bear, her nemesis Mean Mama, and the rest of her tyrannical friends. Each of these characters shape Jennifer's ability to maintain peace of mind while battling the insane stereotypes around race, class, and gender contained in mainstream and popular culture. It's a story that will resonate with anyone who grew up feeling like an outsider. Read more...
100 Things Avengers Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die
100 Things Avengers Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die By Dan Casey

With extensive backstories and comic lore, this lively, detailed book explores the characters, storylines, and facts every Avengers fan should know. This guide covers the history of how the group went from Justice League knockoff to billion-dollar franchise; the history of Ultron, Thanos, and the Infinity Gauntlet; and the series' seminal storylines, writers, and artists. It includes information on everyone's favorite Avengers, including Iron Man, Thor, Hulk, Captain America, Hawkeye, and Black Widow, as well as members of the Secret Avengers and the New Avengers. Author Daniel Casey has collected every essential piece of Avengers knowledge and trivia, including why the Avengers went out for shawarma, as well as must-do activities, such as how to make the most of your Comic-Con experience and how to properly preserve your comic book collection, and ranks them all, providing an entertaining and easy-to-follow checklist for fans of all ages. Read more...
Harold and Maude
Harold and Maude By Colin Higgins

Nineteen-year-old Harold Chasen is obsessed with death. He fakes suicides to shock his self-obsessed mother, drives a hearse, and attends funerals of complete strangers. Seventy-nine-year-old Maude Chardin, on the other hand, adores life. She liberates trees from city sidewalks and transplants them to the forest, paints smiles on the faces of church statues, and "borrows" cars to remind their owners that life is fleeting—here today, gone tomorrow! A chance meeting between the two turns into a madcap, whirlwind romance, and Harold learns that life is worth living, and how to play the banjo. Harold and Maude started as Colin Higgins's master's thesis at UCLA film school before being made into the 1971 film directed by Hal Ashby. The quirky, dark comedy gained a loyal cult following, and in 1997 it was selected for inclusion on the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress. Higgins's novelization was released with the original film but has been out of print for more than thirty years. Fans who have seen the movie dozens of times will find this a valuable companion, as it gives fresh elements to watch for and answers many of the film's unresolved questions. Read more...
By Trolley Past Thimbledon Bridge
By Trolley Past Thimbledon Bridge By Ashley Bryan, Illustrated by Marvin Bileck

This picture book takes children of all ages on a trolley-ride dream adventure. Featuring the extraordinary illustrations of Caldecott Honoree, Marvin Bileck, this book is a dream caught on paper with the sense of magic and wonder and unfettered imagination of a child. As sleep starts the journey into the blue, marvelous threads unravel dreamy images out of the blue revealing animals, far-off places, a circus, games, toys, wind, rain, a touch of this and a touch of that, words and wordplay. A poem accompanies the whimsical illustrations, perfectly capturing the sense of awe and excitement of childhood. With the eyes of a child, or simply the heart of a child, this book invites you into a dream world, an allegory, a journey. Read more...

Bowie on Bowie
Bowie on Bowie Edited by Sean Egan

Bowie on Bowie presents some of the best interviews David Bowie has granted in his near five-decade career. Each featured interview traces a new step in his unique journey, successively freezing him in time in all of his various incarnations, from a young novelty hit-maker and Ziggy Stardust to plastic soul player, 1980s sell-out, and the artistically reborn and beloved elder statesman of challenging popular music. In all of these iterations he is remarkably articulate and also preternaturally polite as almost every interviewer remarks upon his charm. The features in this book come from outlets both prestigious—Melody Maker, MOJO, New Musical Express, Q, Rolling Stone—and less well-known—the Drummer, Guitar, Ikon, Mr. Showbiz—but no matter the renown of the magazine, newspaper, or website, Bowie lets us approach the nerve center of his notoriously creative output. Read more...

Book of Tripe
Book of Tripe By Stephane Reynaud, Photographs By Marie-Pierre Morel, Illustrated by José Reis de Matos

The highly acclaimed author of French Feasts and Pork & Sons explains what to do with gizzards, kidneys, feet, brains, tails, and all the restFrom much-loved chef Stéphane Reynaud comes an extensive collection of nose to tail recipes combining responsible eating with delicious cuisine. Stéphane's recipes showcase everything from traditional dishes to more modern fare including Chicken Liver Soufflés, Pig Trotter and Dandelion Salad, Lamb's Liver and Caramelised Apples, Sweetbreads with Cream, Pan-fried Duck Hearts with Ginger, Peppered Brain Fritters, and Curried Pork Cheeks among many others. This charmingly presented book will allay your prejudices and give you the perfect introduction to the world of tripe. Recipes include dual measurements. Read more...

Atlanta: Then and Now®
Atlanta: Then and Now® By Michael Rose

Archive images from Atlanta's early days, when it was known as the "Gate City," are paired with the same view today, as the bustling capital of the New SouthAtlanta blends the old-Southern charm and hospitality of its history with the energy of the modern millennial city. Staked out in the 1837 wilderness of northeast Georgia, the site that became Atlanta was identified as the termination point for the as-yet unbuilt railroad line. Since that time, transportation has been key to the city's growth, from its declaration as the Gate City of the South in 1857, its prominence as a distribution center during the Civil War, to its current designation as home of the nation's busiest airport. At the end of the 19th century, Atlanta presented itself to the world in a grand international exposition; it closed the next century by bringing the world to Atlanta as it hosted the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Throughout this drive from rural terminal to urban metropolis, Atlanta has witnessed incredible growth. The scenes in this book document this change as the city's tree-lined avenues and country crossroads gave way to high-rises, busy city intersections, and community growth. Atlanta: Then and Now is a captivating chronicle of history and change since the dawn of the camera age. It pairs historic photographs, many more than a century old, with specially commissioned views of the same scene as it exists today to show the evolution of Atlanta from its early years to the very different city that it is today. Sites include: Ellis, Hunter, Alabama, Marietta, Peachtree and Decatur Streets, Train Gulch, Cabbage Town, Inman Park, Georgian Terrace, Terminal Station, The Castle, and Margaret Mitchell Square Read more...
Arctic Crime and Punishment
Arctic Crime and Punishment By Kenn Harper

In this latest edition in the In Those Days: Collected Writings on Arctic History series, Kenn Harper shares the tales of murderers, thieves, and fraudsters, as well as the wrongfully accused, in the early days of Northern colonization. In the 19th and 20th centuries, settler and Inuit ideas of justice clashed, leading to some of the most unusual trials and punishments in history. Included in this collection are the stories of criminals and victims, both southern and Inuit, and of the difficulties of finding justice in a land that was rapidly changing. Read more...

Code Name Pauline
Code Name Pauline By Pearl Witherington Cornioley, Edited by Kathryn Atwood

There was a full moon on the evening of September 22, 1943, when Pearl Witherington, age 29, parachuted into France to aid the French Resistance as a special agent for the British Special Operations Executive (SOE). Out of the 400 agents sent to France during the German occupation, 39 were women. Pearl, whom the SOE called "cool and resourceful and extremely determined" and "the best shot, male or female, we have yet had," became one of the most celebrated female World War II resistance fighters.In Code Name Pauline Pearl describes in a series of plainspoken reminiscences her difficult childhood and harrowing escape from France in 1940; her recruitment and training as a special agent; the logistics and dangers of posing as a cosmetics saleswoman to make her way around the country as an undercover courier; and both failed and successful attempts at sabotaging the Nazis. She tells how, when the leader of her network was caught by the Gestapo, she became "Pauline" and rose to command a 3,500-strong band of French Resistance fighters. With an annotated list of key figures, an appendix of original unedited interview extracts—including Pearl's husband Henri's story—and never-before-published photographs from Pearl's personal collection, Code Name Pauline will captivate World War II buffs of any age and, just as Pearl wished, inspire young people. Read more...
Playing as if the World Mattered
Playing as if the World Mattered By Gabriel Kuhn

The world of sports is often associated with commercialism, corruption, and reckless competition. Liberals have objected to sport being used for political propaganda, and leftists have decried its role in distracting the masses from the class struggle. Yet, since the beginning of organized sports, athletes, fans, and officials have tried to administer and play it in ways that strengthen, rather than hinder, progressive social change. From the workers' sports movement in the early 20th century to the civil rights struggle transforming sports in the 1960s to the current global network of grassroots sports clubs, there has been a glowing desire to include sports in the struggle for liberation and social justice. With the help of numerous full-color illustrations—from posters and leaflets to paintings and photographs—Playing as if the World Mattered makes this history tangible and introduces an understanding of sports beyond chauvinistic jingoism, corporate-media chat rooms, and multibillion-dollar business deals. Read more...
Ghetto Brother
Ghetto Brother By Julian Voloj, Illustrated by Claudia Ahlering, Introduction by Jeff Chang

An engrossing and counter view of one of the most dangerous elements of American urban history, this graphic novel tells the true story of Benjy Melendez, a Bronx legend, son of Puerto-Rican immigrants, who founded, at the end of the 1960s, the notorious Ghetto Brothers gang. From the seemingly bombed-out ravages of his neighborhood, wracked by drugs, poverty, and violence, he managed to extract an incredibly positive energy from this riot ridden era: his multiracial gang promoted peace rather than violence. After initiating a gang truce, the Ghetto Brothers held weekly concerts on the streets or in abandoned buildings, which fostered the emergence of hip-hop. Melendez also began to reclaim his Jewish roots after learning about his family's dramatic crypto-Jewish background. Read more...
Hoodwinked!
Hoodwinked! By Kanbar Entertainment

The classic tale of Little Red Riding Hood gets a modern twist and turns into a wild-and-crazy detective story in this CGI animated family film and book. When The Big Bad Wolf breaks into Granny's house and accosts Red, the Woodsman attempts to save the little girl. Once the investigation starts, we get two very different stories about what happened. What was once a simple domestic disturbance case quickly unravels into a conspiracy of vast proportions. As the laugh-filled tale unfolds, we learn that the truth isn't always what it seems, and even the most guilty-seeming creatures can sometimes be the most innocent. Read more...
A Sorcerer's Apprentice
A Sorcerer's Apprentice By John Herlosky

Follow the fascinating story of one man's journey into the realm of the fantastic: the CIA-sponsored psychic spies with the ability to extend their consciousness to accurately describe targets not only half a world away but to look into the future as well. It all sounded like science fiction to John Herlosky after reading an expose by former member of the CIA's Project Stargate, Dr. David Morehouse. Two years later, skeptical but intrigued by the possibilities implied, John entered the classroom of Dr. Morehouse to find out the truth—and never looked back. Sorcerer's Apprentice is an autobiographical account of the author's experience learning the CIA-sponsored scientifically validated form of extrasensory perception called "remote viewing." The book chronicles the author's journey from interested skeptic to operational remote viewer working his first mission as well as his former life as a police officer and private military contractor. He takes you on a journey from the crushing depths and pathos of the wreck of the Titanic to the fate of a downed pilot missing for 19 years from the first Gulf War. Witness the personal turmoil as the author's long-held beliefs clash with the powerful implications of his experiences. Read more...
Barry Louis Polisar's a Little Different
Barry Louis Polisar's a Little Different By Barry Polisar

Children will be delighted by the wry, sly, and witty lyrics of Barry Louis Polisar. This recording includes 17 songs with musical homages to Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, the Native American a capella group Ulali, and other artists. It features 45 minutes of songs such as a blues version of “I’m a Slug,” a joyful song called “Potty Training,” and the song “Homemade Band,” in which Barry uses everyday kitchen utensils as instruments. He is joined by Ray Tilkens and his various instruments, which give this recording a textured and original sound. Read more...
Strangers in the Bronx
Strangers in the Bronx By Andrew O'Toole, Foreword by Marty Appel

Rare is the athlete who captures the imagination of a generation. In Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle, sports culture had two such figures. Undoubtedly, DiMaggio and Mantle are two of the most revered names in baseball literature. However, there is one particular moment that has been overlooked by baseball historians and writers: the 1951 pennant-winning New York Yankees team—DiMaggio's last year and Mantle's rookie season. For that one year, the paths of these two baseball icons converged, the naissance of Mantle's career poignantly juxtaposed with the slow descent of DiMaggio's final season. Strangers in the Bronx is more than a chronicle of a World Series–winning team, it is also a study of heroes: the decline of an all-too mortal American icon and the emergence of the newest sensation in sport. Read more...
Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant
Gumption: Taking Bubba Gump from Movie to Restaurant By Scott Barnett

Written in a cinematic style, this book is about the creation, growth, and sale of the Bubba Gump Shrimp Company. The concept began when Paramount Pictures reached out to see if there was interest in creating a restaurant based on the movie Forrest Gump. It is also the personal story of the author's growth as a CEO and creator of restaurant concepts. A host of situations are described such as restaurant concept creation, high stakes boardroom confrontations, and escaping corrupt officials in foreign lands. The narrative is partly an unvarnished peak behind the everyday scenes of restaurants, movie studios, and Wall Street. There is also an almost step-by-step recounting of how the Bubba Gump concept and others were created and operated. Lessons can be learned on unorthodox methods used in moving from traditional approaches to untried ways of doing business. Read more...
A Delicate Affair on the Western Front
A Delicate Affair on the Western Front By Terrence J. Finnegan

Could the newly arrived American troops be trusted? They were greenhorns, having seen practically no action. The surprise attack at Seicheprey on April 20 was spearheaded by the elite German stormtroopers (Stosstruppen) supported by aircraft, trench mortars, and heavy artillery and was designed as a propaganda coup against the "weak" newcomers. On the edge of the well-named Forêt de Mort Homme, the Connecticut boys of the 102nd regiment bore the brunt. The Americans fell back in disarray in a hell of hand-to-hand fighting; one U.S. cook killed two Germans with his meat cleaver. "A delicate affair" is an actual label applied by one U.S. command report after the battle—and it was an affair with significance beyond its outcome, as the first engagement between U.S. and German forces. Relying entirely on primary sources throughout, the author uses the battle as a jumping-off point to describe how all battles developed in the war, through intelligence (or lack of it) and minute-by-minute command decisions. Read More...
101 Outstanding Graphic Novels
101 Outstanding Graphic Novels By Stephen Weiner, Edited by Daniel J. Fingeroth, Introduction by Ellen Forney

The popular primer on the best graphic novels, initially called The 101 Best Graphic Novels, is back in its third updated edition. Expert librarian Stephen Weiner—with the crowdsourcing help of professionals in the field, from artists to critics to leading comic store owners—has sifted through the bewildering thousands of graphic novels now available to come up with an outstanding, not-to-be-missed 101. With an all-encompassing variety of genres, including both fiction and nonfiction, this serves as a great introduction to this increasingly influential world of pop culture and entertainment while also serving as a reference list for fans on what they may have possibly overlooked. Read More...
Interval
Interval By Alice B. Fogel

In this series of poems responding to Johann Sebastian Bach's spectacular "Goldberg Variations," New Hampshire State Poet Laureate Alice B. Fogel has paid homage to a 274-year-old masterpiece and, with the theme of spirit and embodiment that music—and life itself—evoke, has rendered from it a luminous new interpretation. Bach created the Goldbergs' 32 sections using nearly all the styles of western European music at the time; Fogel responds in kind with a range of contemporary poetic styles, including narrative, lyric, and experimental, all confined within the 32-line structure she has borrowed from the composer's 32-bar format. Interval mimics the "baroque" effects of overlapping melodies and harmonies by layering sound, syntax, and sense in multiple voices exploring self, identity, and being. In capturing the essence of this iconic masterpiece, through these poems Fogel has created her own music. Read more...
Tommy Lasorda
Tommy Lasorda By Colin Gunderson, Foreword by Joe Torre

Tommy Lasorda believed that winning wasn't about being the best, but about believing you are the best and that philosophy runs throughout Tommy Lasorda: My Way. Author Colin Gunderson takes readers through Lasorda's days as a player and the manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, including their two World Series Championships in 1981 and 1988. In this book, fans will recall some of their favorite Lasorda anecdotes, and will also be privy to new information and rich background on this national baseball treasure, including memories from an All-Star roster of Dodgers stars.
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life
Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life By Marshall B. Rosenberg, Foreword by Arun Gandhi

Do you hunger for skills to improve the quality of your relationships, to deepen your sense of personal empowerment or to simply communicate more effectively? Nonviolent Communication partners practical skills with a powerful consciousness and vocabulary to help you get what you want peacefully. In this internationally acclaimed text, Marshall Rosenberg offers insightful stories, anecdotes, practical exercises and role-plays that will dramatically change your approach to communication for the better.
What the Mystics Know
What the Mystics Know By Richard Rohr

Drawing from the best and most poetic of Richard Rohr's essays from nearly a quarter of a century, each chapter in this new collection examines one of the seven core mystical truths.
PUMPED
PUMPED By The Boston Globe

This ultimate comeback story is recounted in PUMPED, produced by the Boston Globe, which has chronicled the team's fortunes for New England sports fans since the team's inception, and never more thoroughly than in 2014. This 128-page book captures, game-by-game in insightful words and riveting images, the Patriots' indomitable march to their fourth Super Bowl triumph, while also offering perspective on their seven previous visits to football's ultimate spectacle.
Ernie Banks
Ernie Banks By Phil Rogers

Respected by his baseball peers and beloved by Chicago fans and teammates, Ernie Banks did everything there was to do in the game he loved. Everything, that is, except play in a World Series. How and why that experience eluded him during one season of particular promise—1969—is a key storyline of this fresh look at one of baseball's legendary players. The life of Banks, who had picked cotton outside Dallas as a youth, ascended from a barnstorming semipro team to the major leagues after Kansas City Monarchs manager Buck O'Neil placed him with the Cubs, is detailed in this biography of Mr. Cub. During his time in Chicago, Banks won two MVPs and received an education far better than the one he received in the segregated schools he'd attended, gaining important life skills while playing the game he was born to play.
We Love Each Other
We Love Each Other Illustrated by Yusuke Yonezu

A clever and charming board book with an upbeat theme and a special surprise on the last page—a North American debut by a brilliant illustrator Love is everywhere! And it’s not just us humans. From birds to elephants, rabbits to turtles, there is love and togetherness depicted on every page. Very young readers will enjoy the surprises in this cheerfully inventive little book. The bold, colorful illustrations reveal a surprise beneath the flap on every page, with a final delightful surprise on the last page. Read more...
Live Young, Think Young, Be Young
Live Young, Think Young, Be Young By Donald M. Vickery, By Larry Matson, By Carol Vickery

Why do we believe that aging is the cause of most of our problems as we get older? Age and aging actually have much less to do with it than you think. Live Young, Think Young, Be Young challenges our assumptions and beliefs about aging, and provides a fresh, new understanding of how and why we grow old. It will make you think differently about little things in your daily life that accelerate the three “mega” causes of getting old. In the end, this book is about courage and resilience—the courage to change what can be changed and the resilience to accept what can’t be changed. Together, they provide a powerful plan for staying young in body, mind, and spirit. Read more...
Lemistry
Lemistry Edited by Ra Page, Edited by Magda Raczynska

A celebration of Polish science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem, this anthology brings together writers, critics, and scientists who continue to grapple with Lem’s concerns. Featuring short stories, essays, and especially commissioned translations, this account speculates on Lem’s life and vision while delivering brand-new fiction. From computer games (The Sims was inspired by one of his short stories) to films (the red and blue pills of The Matrix owe much to his Futurological Congress), the presence of this masterful writer can be traced far and wide. Contributors include Brian Aldiss, Frank Cottrell Boyce, Mike Nelson, Jacek Dukaj, and more. Read more...
Report from Planet Midnight
Report from Planet Midnight By Nalo Hopkinson

Infused with feminist, Afro-Caribbean views of the science fiction and fantasy genres, this collection of offbeat and highly original works takes aim at race and racism in literature. In “Report from Planet Midnight,” at the International Association of the Fantastic in the Arts, an alien addresses the crowd, evaluating Earth's "strange" customs, including the marginalization of works by nonwhite and female writers. “Message in a Bottle” shows Greg, an American Indian artist, befriending a strange four-year-old who seems wise beyond her years. While preparing an exhibition, he discovers that the young girl is a traveler from the future sent to recover art from the distant past—which apparently includes his own work. Concluding the book with series editor Terry Bisson’s Outspoken Interview, Nalo Hopkinson shares laughs, loves, and top-secret Caribbean spells. Read more...
Christmas Doodle & Colouring Book
Christmas Doodle & Colouring Book By Egmont Books

What does Father Christmas' workshop look like? What are the children building in the snow? It's time to create your own festive doodles and color right through Christmas with this fun doodle and coloring book. With over 100 funny festive doodles to color in and complete, this book is sure to keep any child entertained over the Christmas period. Read more...
Travelling to Infinity
Travelling to Infinity By Jane Hawking

Soon to be a major motion picture, this moving memoir written by Stephen Hawking's first wife covers the turbulent years of her marriage to the astrophysics genius, her traumatic divorce, and their recent reconciliation. Professor Stephen Hawking is one of the most famous and remarkable scientists of our age and the author of the scientific bestseller A Brief History of Time, which has sold more than 25 million copies. In this compelling memoir, his first wife, Jane Hawking, relates the inside story of their extraordinary marriage. As Stephen's academic renown soared, his body was collapsing under the assaults of a motor neuron disease. Jane's candid account of trying to balance his 24-hour care with the needs of their growing family reveals the inner strength of the author, while the self-evident character and achievements of her husband make for an incredible tale presented with unflinching honesty. Jane's candor is no less apparent when the marriage finally ends in a high-profile meltdown, with Stephen leaving Jane for one of his nurses and Jane marrying an old family friend. In this exceptionally open, moving, and often funny memoir, Jane Hawking confronts not only the acutely complicated and painful dilemmas of her first marriage, but also the relationship's fault lines exposed by the pervasive effects of fame and wealth. The result is a book about optimism, love, and change that will resonate with readers everywhere. Read more...
An Unsocial Socialist
An Unsocial Socialist By George Bernard Shaw

Sidney Trefusis is a proselytizing socialist. Armed with irony and paradox, he is determined to overthrow a society riddled with class and sexual exploitation. Henrietta, his adoring wife, "loves" him: he must abandon her. Son of a millionaire, he gives up everything to pose as an "umble peasant". But when this unsocial socialist goes to work as a gardener in the vicinity of a girls' school he meets his match—for Agatha Wylie is a new kind of woman, perfectly armed: and she doesn't love him. With the character of his clown-prophet Trefusis, George Bernard Shaw presented for the first time his view of what the relationship between the sexes should be. Read more...
A Hilltop on the Marne
A Hilltop on the Marne By Mildred Aldrich

What looked impossible is evidently coming to pass . . . I silently returned to my garden and sat down. War again! This time war was close by—not war about which one can read, as one reads it in the newspapers, as you will read it in the States, far away from it, but war right here—if the Germans can cross the frontier.A Hilltop on the Marne is a collection of letters written by Mildred Aldrich, an American expatriate who had bought a country farmhouse near Paris in the spring of 1914. Writing to her friends back home, she describes her idyllic life in Huiry, the minutiae of her farmhouse and her daily life. Ignoring the panicked pleadings of friends that she return to the U.S. As the political situation in Europe darkens, Aldrich stands firm in her decision to stay in France and her village, come what may. As war breaks out she looks out over Marne valley at the armies moving, hears the cannonade in the distance and watches as soldiers of all nations march down the lanes in turn. Aldrich's narrative goes on to describe the subsequent events of the war until America's entry into the fray and, returning to her narrative after the war, she described the process of rebuilding local life. Read more...
Women Aviators
Women Aviators By Karen Bush Gibson

From the very first days of aviation, women were there. Katherine Wright, though not a pilot, helped her brothers Orville and Wilbur so much that some called her the “Third Wright Brother.” Pioneers such as Baroness Raymonde de Laroche of France ignored those who ignorantly claimed that only men possessed the physical strength or the mental capacity to pilot an airplane, and in 1910 became the first woman awarded a license to fly. A year later, Harriet Quimby was the first woman to earn a pilot’s license in the United States and in 1912 flew across the English Channel—another first. Author Karen Bush Gibson profiles 26 women aviators who sought out and met challenges both in the sky and on the ground, where some still questioned their abilities. Read about barnstormers like Bessie Coleman and racers like Louise Thaden, who bested Amelia Earhart and Pancho Barnes to win the 1929 Women’s Air Derby, sometimes called the Powder Puff Derby. Learn about Jacqueline Cochran who, during World War II, organized and trained the Women Airforce Service Pilots—the WASPs—to serve their country by ferrying airplanes from factories to the front lines and pulling target planes during anti-aircraft artillery training. And see how female pilots today continue to achieve and serve while celebrating their love of flight. Read more...
The Wilful Eye
The Wilful Eye Edited by Isobelle Carmody, Edited by Nan McNab

Margo Lanagan (Tender Morsels), Rosie Borella, Isobelle Carmody, Richard Harland (Worldshaker), Margaret Mahy (The Seven Chinese Brothers), and Martine Murray (Henrietta There's No One Better) have taken inspiration from stories that have shaped us all, tales like "Beauty and the Beast," "The Steadfast Tin Soldier," and "The Snow Queen." This collection carries universal themes of envy and desire, deception and abandonment, courage and sacrifice. Characters are enchanted, they transgress, they yearn, they hunger, they hate, and, sometimes, they kill. Some of the stories inhabit a traditional fairytale world, while others are set in the distant future. Some are set in the present and some in an alternative present. The stories offer no prescription for living or moral advice and none belong in a nursery. Open the covers and submit to their enchantment. Read more...
The Whole of My World
The Whole of My World By Nicole Hayes

A must-read for anyone who's ever loved or lost, drawn a line between then and now, or kept a secret that wouldn't stay hidden Today I am free. No guilt for who's missing, what’s been left behind. My face aches from smiling in the wind and my voice rasps from all the screaming, and I know that it’s been forever since I've felt so completely alive. Desperate to escape her grieving father and harboring her own terrible secret, Shelley disappears into the intoxicating world of AFL (Australian Football League). Joining a motley crew of football players—and, best of all, making friends with one of the star players—Shelley finds somewhere she feels she belongs. Finally she's winning. So why don't her friends get it? There's Josh, who she's known all her life but who she can now barely look at anymore because of the memories of that fateful day, and Tara, whose cold silences Shelley can't understand. And now everyone thinks there's something more going on between Shelley and Mick. But there isn't—is there? When the whole of your world is football, sometimes life gets lost between goals. Read more...
A Shimmer of Angels
A Shimmer of Angels By Lisa M. Basso

In this compelling and spirited debut novel, 16-year-old Rayna Evans has spent the last three years in a mental institution for seeing angels—intent on remaining free, she ignores signs that she may be slipping into a world she has tried to climb out of. When her hallucinations begin showing up at school, can she keep her sanity and prevent students from dying at the hands of angels she cannot admit to seeing? Psychiatry, fantasy, and realism come together here in a story of a young girl struggling with identity, secrets, and confronting her greatest fears. Read more...
Women Heroes of World War I
Women Heroes of World War I By Kathryn Atwood

In time for the 2014 centennial of the start of the Great War, this book brings to life the brave and often surprising exploits of 16 fascinating women from around the world who served their countries at a time when most of them didn’t even have the right to vote. Readers meet 17-year-old Frenchwoman Emilienne Moreau, who assisted the Allies as a guide and set up a first-aid post in her home to attend to the wounded; Russian peasant Maria Bochkareva, who joined the Imperial Russian Army by securing the personal permission of Tsar Nicholas II, was twice wounded in battle and decorated for bravery, and created and led the all-women combat unit the “Women’s Battalion of Death” on the eastern front; and American journalist Madeleine Zabriskie Doty, who risked her life to travel twice to Germany during the war in order to report back the truth, whatever the cost. These and other suspense-filled stories of brave girls and women are told through the use of engaging narrative, dialogue, direct quotes, and document and diary excerpts to lend authenticity and immediacy. Introductory material opens each section to provide solid historical context, and each profile includes informative sidebars and “Learn More” lists of relevant books and websites, making this a fabulous resource for students, teachers, parents, libraries, and homeschoolers. Read more...
Supergeek! Robots, Space and Furry Animals
Supergeek! Robots, Space and Furry Animals By Glenn Murphy

Are you a supergeek? Further test yourself in this second volume of the book that's also a game. This book features more than 300 fun science questions and answers to test your knowledge. Find out all about blood and guts, senses and feelings, robots, furry animals, and space. There are instructions at the back of the book that allow you to "play" the book too, on your own or in a group. Read more...
Fatal Light
Fatal Light By Richard Currey

A devastating portrait of war in all its horror, brutality, and mindlessness, this extraordinary novel is written in beautifully cadenced prose. A combat medic in Vietnam faces the chaos of war, set against the tranquil scenes of family life back home in small-town America. This young man’s rite of passage is traced through jungle combat to malaria-induced fever visions to the purgatory of life in military-occupied Saigon. After returning home from war to stay with his grandfather, he confronts his own shattered personal history and the mysterious human capacity for renewal. Read more...
The Power Book
The Power Book By Rose Herceg

From power in relationships to power in families to power in society to power in the workplace, how to be a more powerful person while keeping one's humanity and decency. Power can be benevolent, and it can be gentle. You can still get exactly what you want without resorting to backstabbing moves. This book discusses how you can have power—the good kind—without having to betray yourself or others. The 200 power plays offered here include such important lessons as "Always write it down," "Ask for help and ask early," "Know there's no normal," and "Play fair, especially when you have the winning cards." This book is meant to be dipped into as inspiration, as needed, for new ways of to gain social currency. Read more...
Frank Lloyd Wright for Kids
Frank Lloyd Wright for Kids By Kathleen Thorne-Thomsen

An engaging, kid-friendly exploration of America's leading architect and his work This revised and updated edition of a longstanding classic, Frank Lloyd Wright for Kids, details the life, times, and work of the celebrated architect. Through simple, kid-friendly prose and anecdotes, author Kathleen Thorne-Thomsen describes the influences of Wright's Wisconsin childhood filled with nature, music, and close family ties; his struggles to find work as a young architect; the unique style that led him to the top of his profession; and masterpieces such as the Robie House, Hollyhock House, Fallingwater, the Guggenheim, and many others. Also discussed are Wright's sometimes controversial private and public life and the people and times that influenced him and vice-versa, with new sidebars on topics such as the Chicago and Bauhaus schools of architecture, Friedrich Froebel and his toy blocks that enchanted Wright as a child, and the 1893 Chicago World's Fair. Budding architects will delve into architectural and design concepts while having fun through 21 hands-on projects, such as creating an edible model of Fallingwater, making a miniature Japanese kite, reading an architectural plan, and much more. A time line, glossary, bibliography, and list of houses to visit are also included. Read more...
The Admiral and the Ambassador
The Admiral and the Ambassador By Scott Martelle

On July 20, 1792, the body of Admiral John Paul Jones, Father of the American Navy, was buried in the Saint LouisCemetery on the outskirts of Paris. As the French Revolution was gathering steam, the unmarked location of Jones's grave was nobody's primary concern. And though the admiral was not forgotten to history, in time he was certainly lost beneath the soil in the City of Light. Luckily, Jones had been sealed in a lead-lined coffin filled with alcohol to preserve the body. In theory, if somebody could locate that coffin, Jones could be returned to the United States for a proper burial. That somebody was Horace Porter, Civil War hero, aide to General (and later President) Ulysses S. Grant, Republican Party fundraiser, and US ambassador to France from 1897 to 1905. Porter had been a driving force in the creation of Grant's Tomb, and he developed a similar sense of duty regarding the final interment of John Paul Jones. The Admiral and the Ambassador details Porter's long, relentless search for the lead-lined coffin, first through scraps of archive material and written recollections of funeral attendees, and then beneath the rickety buildings that had been constructed over what Porter believed to be the graveyard. Part history, part biography, and part detective story, The Admiral and the Ambassador is a fascinating look into the compelling real-life characters who populated the first century of the United States of America. Read more...
Birdie Bowers
Birdie Bowers By Anne Strathie

The story of Birdie Bowers—one of the four men who reached the South Pole with Captain Scott—and his indefatigable spirit Described by Captain Scott as "a marvel" and "indomitable to the last," Henry "Birdie" Bowers (1883–1912) realized his life's ambition when he was selected for Scott's Terra Nova Expedition to the Antarctic, yet he was only asked to join the team that would actually reach the South Pole at the last moment. He died on the return journey, caught in a blizzard with Scott and Edward Wilson. Born to a seafaring father and adventurous mother on the Firth of Clyde, Bowers' boyhood obsession with travel and adventure took him round the world several times and his life appears, in hindsight, to have been a ceaseless preparation for his ultimate Antarctic challenge. Only 5'4", he was nevertheless a bundle of energy: knowledgeable, determined, and the ultimate team player. This new biography, drawing on Bowers' letters and journals and previously neglected material, sheds new light on his achievements and tells the full story of the hardy naval officer who could always lift his companions' spirits. Read more...
Forgotten Footprints
Forgotten Footprints By John Harrison

A mix of history, geography, myth, and personal truth, this book explores the Antarctic Peninsula, the South Shetland Islands, and the Weddell Sea—the most visited places in Antarctica. Filled with beautiful photographs by the author from his travels, this record offers a selection of anecdotal accounts of the merchantmen, navy men, sealers, whalers, and aviators who, along with scientists and adventurers, drew the first ghostly maps of the white continent. It delves into the heads and hearts of those who were driven to discover the unknown land and is ideal for the armchair traveler who wants to explore the continent’s past and present. Read more...
La Belle Créole
La Belle Créole By Alina García-Lapuerta

Known for her beauty and angelic voice, Mercedes Santa Cruz y Montalvo, la Belle Créole, was a Cuban-born star of nineteenth-century Parisian society. She befriended aristocrats and artists alike, including Balzac, Baron de Rothschild, Rossini, and the opera diva La Malibran. A daughter of the creole aristocracy, Mercedes led a tumultuous life, leaving her native Havana as a teenager to join her mother in the heart of Madrid's elite society. As Napoleon swept Spain into the Peninsular War, Mercedes' family remained at the center of the storm, and her marriage to French general Christophe-Antoine Merlin tied her fortunes to France. Arriving in Paris in the aftermath of the French defeat, she re-created her life, ultimately hosting the city's premier musical salon. Acknowledged as one of the greatest amateur sopranos of her day, she nurtured artistic careers and daringly paved the way for well-born singers to publicly perform in lavish philanthropic concerts. Beyond her musical renown, Mercedes achieved fame as a writer. Her memoirs and travel writings introduced European audiences to nineteenth-century Cuban society and contributed to the debate over slavery. Scholars still quote her descriptions of Havana life and recognize her as Cuba's earliest female author. Mercedes epitomized an unusually modern life, straddling cultures and celebrated on both sides of the Atlantic. Her memoirs, travel writings, and very personal correspondence serve as the basis for this first-ever English-language account of the passionate and adventuresome Belle Créole. Read more...
Stories for Halloween
Stories for Halloween By Edgar Allan Poe

The midnight hour approaches with those lying in bed try to sleep, but there is the howling of the wind outside, the creak of a floorboard, the scream of a cat, the ticking clock. As the heart beats and skin crawls, children everywhere select this book of tales and enter a world-like nightmare, haunted by dark fears, guilty secrets, and the bloody consequences of rage, revenge and obsession. They cannot tear themselves away as these tales appall and yet enthral them. No mere mortal can resist the master of Gothic horror, Edgar Allan Poe. Read more...
The Adventures of Scarygirl
The Adventures of Scarygirl By Nathan Jurevicius

When Scarygirl is abandoned at on a remote peninsula at the large friendly octopus Blister's house, Blister and Scarygirl become best friends. But no one knows where she came from, or who she really is, and her dreams are full of strange and disturbing visions. As the dreams become more and more urgent, Scarygirl knows she has to leave the safety of Blister's home and travel over the mountains to the city to find out the secrets of her past. Will Dr. Maybee's laboratory give her the answers she is seeking, or will his dark forces overpower her? Read more...
Ghost Stories
Ghost Stories By M. R. James, Introduction by Ruth Rendell

M. R. James wrote his ghost stories to entertain friends on Christmas Eve, and they went on to both transform and modernize a genre. James harnesses the power of suggestion to move from a recognizable world to one that is indefinably strange, and then unforgettably terrifying. Sheets, pictures, carvings, a doll's house, a lonely beach, a branch tapping on a window—ordinary things take on more than a tinge of dread in the hands of the original master of suspense. James's prescription for his ghost stories was to "let the ominous thing put out its head, unobtrusively at first, and then more insistently, until it holds the stage." Read more...
Living the Spiritual Principles of Health and Well-Being
Living the Spiritual Principles of Health and Well-Being By John-Roger, By Paul Kaye, Foreword by Philip Barr

Looking at health from a holistic, multidimensional perspective, this reference seeks to provide a spiritual foundation for well-being that supplements traditional medical- and alternative-healing models. By exploring the concepts of health and disease from the inside out and breaking down the process into simple precepts that can be implemented at no cost, this guide presents techniques and practices that develop a greater awareness of the factors that impact health. An analysis of eight spiritual principles that serve as a basis for healthy living are followed by useful information regarding stress, fasting, stretching, breathing, laughter, acid and alkali balance, and the effect of sugar on the body. A 30-day health plan rounds out the discussion, equipping one with significant and meaningful steps towards health and well-being that can be maintained for life. Read more...
The Little Book of Ghosts
The Little Book of Ghosts By Paul Adams

This little gem of a book is a repository of intriguing, fascinating, obscure, strange, and entertaining facts and trivia surrounding ghosts. Within this volume are such chapters as haunted houses, roads, woods and byways, phantom animals, royal ghosts, poltergeists, and haunted objects, while not forgotten are spooky séances and time-slip ghosts, as well as some of the famous ghost-hunters themselves, including Harry Price, Elliot O'Donnell, and R. Thurston Hopkins. Anyone curious enough to pick up this book will be terrified, enthralled, and never short of facts about the mysterious realm of ghosts and haunted places. Read more...
Irish Ghosts & Hauntings
Irish Ghosts & Hauntings By Michael Scott

What is it about Ireland’s past that so haunts the imagination? More than one answer can be found in Michael Scotts’s powerful new collection of 29 tales. To start with, in a newly Christianized Ireland, monks do battle with a devilish monster that has killed a river. All the water in this collection, from rivers to lakes, conceal dangers that men and women would best avoid. Ready to tempt Ireland’s new conquerors — humankind— supernatural forces hide beneath waves, in bogs, in the very land, waiting. With his usual inventiveness, Michael Scott juxtaposes the old and the new, the ancient and modern, showing that in everyday situations, the curses of Ireland’s mythic past lie imp–like, threatening destruction. Read more...
The System
The System By Peter Kuper, Introduction by Calvin Reid

It has been said that the flutter of insect wings in the Indian Ocean can send a hurricane crashing against the shores of the American Northeast, and such a premise lies at the core of The System, a wordless graphic novel created and painted by award-winning illustrator Peter Kuper. A sleazy stockbroker is lining his pockets, a corrupt cop is shaking down drug dealers, a mercenary bomber is setting the timer, a serial killer is stalking strippers, a political scandal is about to explode, the planet is burning, and nobody’s talking. Told without captions or dialogue, this piece of art is an astonishing progression of vivid imagery, each brilliantly executed panel contains layer upon layer of information that forms a vast and intricate tour of an ominous world of coincidences and consequences. Read more...
The Cost of Lunch, Etc.
The Cost of Lunch, Etc. By Marge Piercy

In this collection of short stories, bestselling author Marge Piercy brings us glimpses into the lives of everyday women moving through and making sense of their daily internal and external worlds. Keeping to the engaging, accessible language of Piercy’s novels, the collection spans decades of her writing along with a range of locations, ages, and emotional states of her protagonists. From the first-person account of hoarding and a girl’s narrative of sexual and spiritual discovery to the recounting of a past love affair, each story is a tangible, vivid snapshot in a varied and subtly curated gallery of work. Whether grappling with death, familial relationships, friendship, sex, illness, or religion, Piercy’s writing is as passionate, lucid, insightful, and thoughtfully alive as ever. Read more...
Blood in the Fields
Blood in the Fields By Julia Reynolds

The city of Salinas, California, is the birthplace of John Steinbeck and the setting for his epic masterpiece, East of Eden, but it is also the home of Nuestra Familia, one of the most violent gangs in America. Born in the prisons of California in the late 1960s, Nuestra Familia expanded to control drug trafficking and extortion operations throughout the northern half of the state, and left a trail of bodies in its wake. Prize-winning journalist and Nieman Fellow Julia Reynolds tells the gang's story from the inside out, following young men and women as they search for a new kind of family, quests that usually lead to murder and betrayal. Blood in the Fields also documents the history of Operation Black Widow, the FBI's questionable decade-long effort to dismantle the Nuestra Familia, along with its compromised informants and the turf wars it created with local law enforcement agencies. Journalist Reynolds uses her unprecedented access to gang members, both in and out of prison, as well as undercover wire taps, depositions, and court documents to weave a gripping, comprehensive history of this brutal criminal organization and the lives it destroyed. Read more...
A Secret Woman
A Secret Woman By Rose Solari

Louise Terry is the quintessential, modern American woman; a successful and independent artist, sexually liberated and head strong, she's determined to carve out a life for herself where her painting comes first and where she can avoid messy romantic entanglements. But when her estranged mother, Margaret, dies, leaving a box of documents, photos, and journals, Louise discovers in its contents a new and very different woman from the one who raised her. This Margaret was admired by Catholic priests and Wiccan priestesses alike for her spiritual gifts and was working, at the time of her death, on assembling her visions of a 12th-century cross-dressing woman mystic who not only managed to infiltrate the male bastion of Glastonbury Abbey, but who instigated the tragic fire that burned it to the ground in 1184. Determined to pursue the fragments her mother left behind, Louise travels to England where she meets a cast of characters whom she must depend on to find her way. Blurring the boundaries between past and present, between the body and the spirit, between female and male, this page-turning mystery is a sexy romp through time and space, a profound meditation on the mother-daughter connection, and an enlightening exploration of what it means to make love, to make art, and to make a life worth living. Read more...
Tallow
Tallow By Karen Brooks

The first book in a captivating new science fiction series tells a story of intrigue, deadly magic, and a love so deep it transcends life itself. On the edge of a mystical border called the Limen, close to a beautiful canal-laced city, a humble candlemaker rescues a child whom he raises as his apprentice. Years pass and the child's unusual talents are revealed, the gentle art of candlemaking slowly transforming into something far more sinister. Lingering in the shadows, enemies watch and wait—a vengeful aristocrat, an exotic queen, and the lethal creatures known only as the Morte Whisperers. They hunger after the child's ancient magic and will do anything to control it—betray, lie, manipulate—even murder. In a world of darkness, there is one who will bring light, but can the child survive long enough to fulfil that destiny? Read more...
Apocalypse Next Tuesday
Apocalypse Next Tuesday By David Safier

When 30-something Marie jilts her boring boyfriend at the altar she wonders if life can get any worse. So when a handsome carpenter comes to work on the roof, she realizes she has nothing to lose by asking him out. Even his bizarre assertions that he is Jesus isn’t enough to put Marie off—her biological clock is ticking, and it's time to settle down. Meanwhile, Satan (a dead ringer for George Clooney) is on the prowl, recruiting horsemen for next week's Armageddon, scheduled for Tuesday, and Archangel Gabriel has discovered the pleasures of the flesh and is off on a sex marathon. Things are looking grim. Fortunately, Marie is dating the son of God—maybe, just maybe, he can get things straightened out. Provocative and blasphemous (with added pizza), this is a wonderfully light, witty book full of surprises. Read more...
A Witch in Winter
A Witch in Winter By Ruth Warburton

Anna Winterson doesn't know she's a witch and would probably mock you for believing in magic, but after moving to the small town of Winter with her father, she learns more than she ever wanted to about power. When Anna meets Seth, she is smitten, but when she enchants him to love her, she unwittingly amplifies a deadly conflict between two witch clans and splits her own heart in two. She wants to love Seth, to let him love her—but if it is her magic that's controlling his passion, then she is as monstrous as the witch clan who are trying to use her amazing powers for their own gain. When love is tangled up in magic, how do you know what's real? Read more...
Cuba Journeys
Cuba Journeys Photographs By Charles Fields, Edited by Rowland Scherman

The wonders of Cuba's landscape, its people, and their lifestyles are captured in this compelling collection of imagery. Havana's highlights are depicted in detail along with classic cars from the golden age of American automobiles, the northern coastal city of Matanzas, and popular white sand beach resorts. Showcasing the World Heritage Sites Old Havana and Trinidad, this striking compilation also tours Guantanamo Bay and the Isla de la Juventud, home to some of Cuba's most important agricultural farmland. From central Cuba's charming colonial cities of Sancti Spiritus and Santa Clara to the tobacco fields and picturesque hills of the Viñales Valley, this photographic journey features commentary on the island's history, geography, economy, and holidays in both English and Spanish. A special feature shows photographs of the Cuban band Interactivo, a collaborative group of Cuban musicians led by the pianist, singer, and composer Roberto Carcasses. An essay by poet Omar Pérez is also included. Read more...
Half Plus Seven
Half Plus Seven By Dan Tyte

Twenty-nine years old with a less-than-healthy appetite for booze and a buzz, Bill lived in a messy rented room, sold his soul daily in a PR agency, and couldn't remember the name of the last woman he screwed. He was a disappointment to his family but indicative of his generation. That was until a £10 psychic and a hanging cat came along to save him. And her—the one whose name he remembered. This is a tale of redemption for Generation Y. Your generation. Watch him. Loathe him. Learn from him. Love him. A coming-of-age-late tale as a jaded PR man seeks meaning and love in his life and addresses past, present, and future along with a misfit cast of mystics, tramps, bar flies, and copywriters. Read more...
The Moaning of Life
The Moaning of Life By Karl Pilkington

Karl Pilkington is 40 years old. He's not married, he doesn't have kids, and he has a job where he's known as an "idiot." It's time for him to take stock and face up to life's big question—what does it all mean? Karl is no stranger to travel, and now he's off on a series of madcap adventures around the globe to find out how other cultures approach life's big issues. Traveling from far-flung tribes to high-tech cities, Karl experiences everything from a drive-through wedding in Las Vegas to a vocational theme park in Japan. He meets a group of people in Mexico who find happiness through pain, attends a clowning school in Los Angeles, and even encounters a woman in Bali who lets him help deliver her baby. Have his experiences changed him? Find out in this hilarious new book where Karl shares his stories and opinions in his inimitable style. Read more...
Hillwilla
Hillwilla By Melanie Forde

Beatrice Desmond, 55, lives on a remote farm nestled in a deep hollow in southern West Virginia. A native of Boston and a graduate of an Ivy League college, Beatrice is a fish out of water in Seneca County; although she maintains contact with certain friends and family, too often, Beatrice retreats into her work as a translator and editor, or into the bottle of Jack Daniel's she maintains nearby. Fate finally intervenes, requiring Beatrice to befriend and shelter Clara, an abused teenager, and accept the job of ghostwriting the memoir of her dashing but enigmatic neighbor, Tanner Fordyce. Gradually, Beatrice finds her resolute independence and crusty reserve soften, her carefully constructed barriers fall, and her guarded and self-protective nature moderates, as she explores the renewed pleasures of emotional involvement. At times sad, at times hilarious, and always quirky, Hillwilla celebrates the glories of nature, the resilience of the human spirit, the healing power derived from genuine connections with others, and the potential for reinventing ourselves—at any age. Read more...
Victricia Malicia
Victricia Malicia By Carrie Clickard, Illustrated by Mark Meyers

Victricia Malicia Calamity Barrett may have been born on her family's pirate ship, but this mild-mannered young lady is sick of the sea: she'd much rather be ashore with her nose permanently buried in a book. But when Scylla the Serpent—the scourge of the sea—appears, quick-thinking Vic saves the ship by thunking the serpent on the head with her trunk full of books. For her bravery she is rewarded with the thing she wants most: a home on a little island. She opens a bookstore, and Landlubber Books becomes the pirates' favorite port in a storm. As Carrie Clickard's nimble, jaunty rhymes roll off the tongue like waves onto shore, children will delight in Victricia's adventures while parents will relate to her family's attempts to understand their unusual daughter. Victricia may not be a typical pirate hero, but she is the captain of her own destiny in this rollicking tale of self-determination, sticking to your dreams, and the joy of reading. Read more...
All Star
All Star By Jesse Lonergan

As the summer of 1998 nears, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa are racing each other to break the home-run record, Bill Clinton is being questioned about a certain Monica Lewinsky, Semisonic’s “Closing Time” is top of the charts, and Carl Carter is leading the Elizabeth Monarchs of rural Vermont to the state championship his senior year. The world is Carl’s oyster: a full scholarship to the University of Maine awaits, going pro after college isn’t out of the question, and he’s so good he can do whatever he wants—until, that is, he makes one very arrogant mistake. Acclaimed graphic novelist Jesse Lonergan offers readers a thought-provoking exploration of the fleeting highs of success in this engrossing book. Read more...
The Fabled Coast
The Fabled Coast By Sophia Kingshill

Pirates and smugglers, ghost ships and sea-serpents, fishermen’s prayers and sailors’ rituals—the coastline of the British Isles plays host to an astonishingly rich variety of local legends, customs, and superstitions. In The Fabled Coast, renowned folklorists Sophia Kingshill and Jennifer Westwood gather together the most enthralling tales and traditions, tracing their origins and examining the facts behind the legends. Was there ever such a beast as the monstrous Kraken? Did a Welsh prince discover America, centuries before Columbus? What happened to the missing crew of the Mary Celeste? Along the way, they recount the stories that are an integral part of the coastal heritage, such as the tale of Drake’s Drum, said to be heard when England was in peril, and the mythical island of Hy Brazil, which for centuries appeared on sea charts and maps to the west of Ireland. The result is an endlessly fascinating, often surprising journey through Britain's island history. Read more...
The Lost Abbot
The Lost Abbot By Susanna Gregory

Matthew Bartholomew doesn't want to travel to Peterborough in the summer of 1358, but his friendship with the lovely Julitta Holm has caused a scandal in Cambridge, so he has no choice. He is one of a party of Bishop's Commissioners, charged to discover what happened to Peterborough's abbot, who went for a ride one day and has not been seen since. When the Commissioners arrive, they find the town in turmoil. A feisty rabble-rouser is encouraging the poor to rise up against their overlords, the abbey is at war with a powerful goldsmith and his army of mercenaries, and there are bitter rivalries between competing shrines. One shrine is dedicated to Lawrence de Oxforde, a vicious felon who was executed for his crimes, but who has been venerated after miracles started occurring at his grave. However, it is not long before murder rears its head, and its first victim is Joan, the woman in charge of Oxforde's tomb. Read more...
Sex from Scratch
Sex from Scratch By Sarah Mirk

With nearly 50 percent of marriages ending in divorce, a growing percentage of women over age 40 choosing not to have children, and more than 3 percent of the population identifying as LGBT, modern life is clearly in need of some modern relationship advice. Sex from Scratch analyzes the facets of contemporary relationships through the struggles, opinions, and experiences of a diverse group of individuals living in nontraditional relationships. Rather than telling readers how to snag a partner and find “true love,” it gleans real-life knowledge from people of all sexualities and genders—including individuals trying to make open relationships work to those who have opted against having children—distilling their hard-earned wisdom. Contributions from Andi Zeisler, Stu Rasmussen, Betty Dodson, and others make this love and dating guidebook an essential, fun, and insightful resource for anyone in any type of relationship. Read more...
Kiddie Cocktails
Kiddie Cocktails By Stuart Sandler, Illustrated by Derek Yaniger, Foreword by Charles Phoenix

A hip retro-styled visual guide to the ultimate collection of nonalcoholic drink recipes Calling vintage lifestyle, cooking, and entertaining enthusiasts of all ages—here is the coolest collection of vintage cocktails, minus the hooch! From the standard Shirley Temple to Cotton Candy, Bahama Mama, and Cactus Juice, this book discusses the appropriate bar equipment, glassware, garnishes, and technique. In addition to hip drinks, the book is filled with recommendations for throwing a swingin' kiddie cocktail party complete with classic punchbowl recipes, party favors, music, and of course a few tasty snack suggestions. The entire book is lavishly illustrated by the internationally renowned artist Derek Yaniger. Read more...
Joss Whedon
Joss Whedon By Amy Pascale, Foreword by Nathan Fillion

From the cult favorite Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which netted four million viewers per episode, to the summer blockbuster The Avengers, which amassed a box office of $1.5 billion, Joss Whedon has made a name for himself in Hollywood for his penchant for telling meaningful, personal tales about love, death, and redemption even against the most dramatic and larger-than-life backdrops. This biography follows his development from a creative child and teenager who spent years away from his family at an elite English public school, through his early successes—which often turned into frustrating heartbreak in both television (Roseanne) and film (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)—to his breakout turn as the creator, writer, and director of the Buffy television series. Extensive, original interviews with Whedon's family, friends, collaborators, and stars—and with the man himself—offer candid, behind-the-scenes accounts of the making of groundbreaking series such as Buffy, Angel, Firefly, and Dollhouse, as well as new stories about his work with Pixar writers and animators during the creation of Toy Story. Most importantly, however, these conversations present an intimate and revealing portrait of a man whose creativity and storytelling ability have manifested themselves in comics, online media, television, and film. Read more...
Female Executions
Female Executions By Geoffrey Abbott

From Nan Hereford, the cloaked highwayman who held up coaches with just her fists, to the woman who survived the gallows and took her empty coffin away with her, this book illuminates history's darker periods with a detailed and factual approach. Grimly funny and darkly gripping, interspersed with unusual last requests and black and white illustrations throughout, this is history at its most morbidly fascinating. Read more...
William Morris
William Morris By E. P. Thompson, Foreword by Peter Linebaugh

This biographical study is a window into 19th-century British society and the life of William Morris—the great craftsman, architect, designer, poet, and writer—who remains a monumental and influential figure to this day. This account chronicles how his concern with artistic and human values led him to cross what he called the “river of fire” and become a committed socialist—committed not only to the theory of socialism but also to the practice of it in the day-to-day struggle of working women and men in Victorian England. While both the British Labor Movement and the Marxists have venerated Morris, this legacy of his life proves that many of his ideas did not accord with the dominant reforming tendencies, providing a unique perspective on Morris scholarship. Read more...
The Impossible Life of Mary Benson
The Impossible Life of Mary Benson By Rodney Bolt

Sometimes touching and sometimes hilarious, this is the story of one lovable, brilliant woman and her trajectory through the often surprising opportunities and the remarkable limitations of a Victorian woman's life. Young Minnie Sidgwick was just 12 years old when her cousin, 12-year-old Edward Benson, proposed to her in 1853. Edward went on to become Archbishop of Canterbury and little Minnie—as Mary Benson—to preside a social world that ranged from Tennyson, Henry James, and Oscar Wilde to foreign royalty and Queen Victoria herself. Yet Mrs. Benson's most intense relationships were not with her husband and his associates, but with other women. When the Archbishop died, Mary, or "Ben" to her intimates, turned down an offer from the Queen to live at Windsor, and set up home in a Jacobean manor house with her friend Lucy Tait. Drawing on the diaries and novels of the Bensons themselves, including E. F. Benson's Mapp and Lucia novels, as well as the writing of contemporary writers and poets, this book creates a very rich portrait of Mary Benson, her family, her close female friends, and their world. Read more...
The Grand Designer
The Grand Designer By Rosemary Hannah

In the first modern biography of one of the Victorian age’s greatest figures, the story of a wealthy eccentric’s learning, insight, and kindness is told. A lifetime’s collaboration with architects and artists began when John Crichton-Stuart, the third Marquess of Bute, met the renowned Gothic designer William Burges. This fascinating biography tells how Crichton-Stuart’s contributions as a patron produced extraordinary results in architecture, from the High Victorian Gothic exuberance of Cardiff Castle and Castell Coch to the ostentation of Mount Stuart and the sumptuous restoration of the Renaissance Falkland Palace. With spectacular illustrations, this book will enthrall those interested in architecture, Victorian philanthropy, and Scottish culture. Read more...
Rescuing Julia Twice
Rescuing Julia Twice By Tina Traster, Foreword by Melissa Fay Greene

In moving and refreshingly candid prose, Rescuing Julia Twice tells Traster's foreign-adoption story, from dealing with the bleak landscape and inscrutable adoption handlers in Siberia, to her feelings of inexperience and ambivalence at being a new mother in her early forties, to her grow­ing realization over months then years that something was "not quite right" with her daughter, Julia, who remained cold and emo­tionally detached. Why wouldn't she look her parents in the eye or accept their embraces? Why didn't she cry when she got hurt? Why didn't she make friends at school? Traster de­scribes how uncertainty turned to despair as she blamed herself and her mothering skills for her daughter's troublesome behavioral is­sues, until she came to understand that Julia suffered from reactive attachment disorder, a serious condition associated with infants and young children who have been neglect­ed, abused, or orphaned in infancy. Hoping to help lift the veil of secrecy and shame that too often surrounds parents struggling with attachment issues, Traster describes how with work, commitment, and acceptance, she and her husband have been able to close the gulf between them and their daughter to form a loving bond, and concludes by providing practical advice, strategies, and resources for parents and caregivers. Read more...
J Is for Jazz
J Is for Jazz By Ann Ingalls, By Bright Connections Media

B is for Blues, the heart of jazz, and some of the best jazz cats have been hip to the blues! Go on a riotous romp through some of the foundations of jazz in this fun and educational look at America's golden era of music. Readers are transported into the Jazz Age through sweeping, bold illustrations and lyrical profiles of historical figures and musical terms. Featuring a glossary of jazz slang, this ABC primer is sure to inform and delight readers and music lovers of all ages. Read more...
Cold Sweat
Cold Sweat By Yamma Brown, By Robin Gaby Fisher

Being the child of a global superstar is never easy. Being the daughter of the Godfather of Soul—that's a category unto itself. Like every little girl, Yamma Brown wanted her father's attention, but fame, drugs, jail, and the complicated women in James Brown's life set the stage for an uncommon childhood. Cold Sweat is about how Yamma rose to meet every challenge. Though packed with celebrity appearances ranging from Michael Jackson to Al Sharpton, Cold Sweat is not just a celebrity book. It focuses on an everyday issue faced by millions of women—domestic violence—and in this book Yamma faces it in an honest and powerfully moving way. Dealing with a complex and famous father eventually took a backseat to coping with her own abusive and deceitful marriage. Cold Sweat is about how Yamma got caught in the same trap as her mother, doing things in her adult life that, as a child, she'd promised herself she'd never do. But at the same time, Yamma learned valuable lessons about life from her father. The struggles she went through, both as a child and as an adult, make for a gripping read and, in the end, a profound examination of the nature of celebrity, violence, and survival. Read more...
The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm
The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm By LeVar Burton, By Susan Schaefer Bernardo, Illustrated by Courtenay Fletcher

When little Mica Mouse is scared by thunder booming outside her cozy home, Papa Mouse reaches for just the right story to comfort her. Hugging her close, he begins to read The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm. In this poetic book-within-a-book, a happy little rhinoceros is overwhelmed by a storm that sweeps away everything he loves. Swallowing the storm just makes him feel worse, so Rhino sets off on a whimsical journey toward healing. Along the way, he meets many friends, including a kind spider, a brave kangaroo, a wise tortoise, and an uplifting whale. With their help, Rhino lets go of the storm inside and learns to see the light in a world turned gray. Mica Mouse is soothed by the story and Papa's gentle reminder that even though bad things sometimes happen, the world is full of people who care. In his first children's book, longtime Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton gives us an engaging resource to help children express their feelings and navigate through difficult experiences. The "Take a Deeper Look" page at the end of the book even provides discussion questions to facilitate a healing dialogue. Read more...
Second Thoughts
Second Thoughts By Cara Bertrand

Secrets, lies, and looming deaths—all things Lainey Young deals with in a typical day of high school. In her senior year at Northbrook Academy—a New England boarding school where the majority of the students and nearly all the staff are members of the Sententia, a hidden society of the psychically gifted—Lainey has even more to worry about. Things like classes, college, her boyfriend, and, of course, the vision she glimpsed of her impending death. But to her surprise, Lainey finds one worry she can cross off her list, namely Senator Daniel Astor, the leader of the Sententia. After a shocking discovery when they finally meet, Lainey realizes maybe she was wrong to distrust the Senator. She relaxes even further when he seems to accept her refusal to work for him after graduation. But with her secrets mounting and the time to solve them running out, there's a final enigma Lainey hasn't yet encountered: Daniel Astor doesn't take no for an answer. Ever. Read more...
Pandora's DNA
Pandora's DNA By Lizzie Stark

Would you cut out your healthy breasts and ovaries if you thought it might save your life? That's not a theoretical question for journalist Lizzie Stark's relatives, who grapple with the horrific legacy of cancer built into the family DNA, a BRCA mutation that has robbed most of her female relatives of breasts, ovaries, peace of mind, or life itself. In Pandora's DNA, Stark uses her family's experience to frame a larger story about the so-called breast cancer genes, exploring the morass of legal quandaries, scientific developments, medical breakthroughs, and ethical concerns that surround the BRCA mutations, from the troubling history of prophylactic surgery and the storied origins of the boob job to the landmark lawsuit against Myriad Genetics, which held patents on the BRCA genes every human carries in their body until the Supreme Court overturned them in 2013. Although a genetic test for cancer risk may sound like the height of scientific development, the treatment remains crude and barbaric. Through her own experience, Stark shows what it's like to live in a brave new world where gazing into a crystal ball of genetics has many unintended consequences. Read more...
Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever
Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever By Tom Neely, Foreword by Rob Halford

Starring notorious muscle-bound punk/metal dudes Henry Rollins and Glenn Danzig (with a little help from soft rockers Hall and Oates), Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever is a love story to end all love stories. And here for the first time is the complete compiled collection of the graphic novel that details the fictitious romance of these real-life music icons. Henry and Glenn are very good “friends”; they are also roommates. Daryl and John live next door; they are Satanists. The 20 short stories about their domestic life that follow offer a true testament to the power of love to overcome even the biggest, manliest egos of our time. Follow along as Henry and Glenn go to therapy together, battle an evil cult in the forest, and profess their love between dealing with repeated jealousy and normal relationship problems. This tongue-in-cheek graphic novel satire is filled with adventure, subtle references, and humor, and the book also features dozens of pinup art and full-color covers from the original series. Read more...
Dubstep Graphics
Dubstep Graphics By Xavier A. Tàpies

Originally an electronic dance music form from the garage, drum and bass, and dub reggae clubs of South London, dubstep has merged with street art, pop art, and design to become a global design and music phenomenon, now entering the mainstream and influencing the likes of Snoop Dogg and Rihanna. The artists that supplied the scene with its imagery for t-shirts, posters, logos, and merchandising have grown a fantastic and distinct brand of provocative graphic design, pop artworks, and street art. Their subversion of regular corporate brands and language have also become a witty trope in recent advertising campaigns. The best of these artists worldwide are featured here, with amazing imagery and detailed analysis showing their influences and connections. This volume is essential for all graphic designers, fascinating for anyone into the club scene, and of interest for those wanting to keep abreast of street art and contemporary visual culture. Read more...
Zombillenium, Vol. 2
Zombillenium, Vol. 2 By Arthur de Pins

Tempers are flaring around Zombillenium, the amusement park run by monsters. When one hires only the witches, vampires, werewolves, and other undead in a region where unemployment is in the double digits, one must expect some friction. But things get particularly ugly when the park’s security is breached from two sides: activists and a very strange visitor, the mother of two peculiar sons that the head of the park seems to remember from somewhere. Presented in Arthur de Pins’s trademark, tongue-in-cheek black humor, this is a stunning beautiful, fully painted graphic novel that plays on that traditional horror genre. Read more...
A Less Boring History of the World
A Less Boring History of the World By Dave Rear

A bit rusty on the Renaissance? In the dark about the Enlightenment? Or, in fact, do you need a revision course on the entire history of the world and want to read a witty, irreverent, definitely not boring romp through everything that has ever happened on planet earth—from 15 billion years BC to the present day? Good. This book tells you everything you need to know from the Big Bang to Barack Obama, taking in the Byzantines, the Black Death, Bin Laden, and the fall of bankers along the way, all boiled down to bite size chunks so that you can finally piece together all the different bits of history—and see how on earth we ended up in the mess we are today. A Less Boring History of the World refreshes your memory and broadens your mind. And, if that’s not enough, it will also make you laugh. A lot. Read more...
Think! Eat! Act!
Think! Eat! Act! By Raffaella Tolicetti

Featuring the wide variety of vegan food prepared on the ships of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, this goal-oriented cookbook shows how to make delicious meals while engaged in activism. From Italian and Spanish dishes to French, Asian, and more, the recipes are not only great tasting but also driven and inspired by living compassionately. In addition to the conscientious and scrumptious food, the book also provides information about current vegan activist campaigns going on around the world. Read more...
World War 3 Illustrated
World War 3 Illustrated Edited by Peter Kuper, Edited by Seth Tobocman, Introduction by Bill Ayers

Founded in 1979 by Seth Tobocman and Peter Kuper, World War 3 Illustrated is a collective of first-time and professional artists who use confrontational comics to shine a little reality on the fantasy world of the American kleptocracy. This full-color retrospective exhibition is arranged thematically, and includes topic of housing rights, feminism, the environment, religion, police brutality, globalization, and depictions of conflicts from the Middle East to the Midwest. World War 3 Illustrated also illuminates the war we wage on each other—and sometimes the one taking place in our own minds. Contributors include Sue Coe, Eric Drooker, Fly, Sandy Jimenez, Sabrina Jones, Peter Kuper, Mac McGill, Kevin Pyle, Spain Rodriguez, Nicole Schulman, Seth Tobocman, Susan Willmarth, and dozens more. Read more...
Knife Edge
Knife Edge By Fergus McNeill

He didn't intend to let her get so close. But now that Kim's become important to him, Robert Naysmith decides to tell his girlfriend his deadly secret. He wants her to recognize the power he holds. He hopes he won't have to kill her. Meanwhile, Detective Inspector Harland hasn't forgotten the serial killer who got away from him. But with nothing to go on, he fears he will never bring him to justice. Until he is seconded to investigate the brutal murder of a woman in her Bristol home. A random attack, a murderer who has carefully covered his tracks . . . alarm bells start ringing. Then Harland meets Kim. In the explosive sequel to Eye Contact, one last game of life and death is about to begin. Read more...
Faith on the Streets
Faith on the Streets By Les Isaac, By Rosalind Davies

Pioneered in London in 2003 by Rev. Les Isaac, Street Pastors is an interdenominational church response to urban problems, engaging with people on the streets to care, listen, and dialogue. There are now 9,000 trained volunteers in around 250 teams around the United Kingdom. This book brings together the stories of some of the many people whose lives have been touched by this exciting initiative over the last decade—people like James, who tells of the night he met street pastors in a Bedfordshire market town, and local government executives like Sir Steve Bullock, Mayor of Lewisham, who supports the work of Street Pastors in south London. We meet Sam, street pastor in Newcastle and hear his story about the costs and privileges of serving his community, and the solicitor who resolves the legal and policy questions that arise when street pastors are in challenging situations on the streets. From the launch of the initiative in Gibraltar to the after-school patrol of a school pastor in Plymouth, this book provides a panoramic view of the work of Street Pastors. Big visions thrive on small details; this book captures some of the individual stories that make the big vision for Street Pastors real in towns and cities in the UK and beyond. Read more...
The Ultimate Creator
The Ultimate Creator By Triumph Books

The Ultimate Minecraft Creator: The Unofficial Building Guide to Minecraft & Other Games is about sharing those brilliant, innovative, and unique creations that the players of the world have made inside this massively popular game. In this book, players will find everything from dazzling medieval castles that soar up to meet the sky, to sprawling underwater bases that are so high-tech they give most sci-fi films a run for their money. With mind-blowingly enormous structures, impossibly detailed cities, and tidy little homes that'll have players envisioning a master architect at work, placing each and every block with care and precision, The Ultimate Minecraft Creator includes something for every style. Among other creations, boats, temples, towns, floating islands, sublime mountainscapes, incredible inventions, addictive mini-games, and more than a few dragons grace these pages. It's the biggest gallery of Minecraft creations this side of the Nether, so grab a copy and delve into the worlds and minds of Minecraft's best builders! Read more...
Nine Lives of a Black Panther
Nine Lives of a Black Panther By Wayne Pharr

In the early morning hours of December 8, 1969, three hundred officers of the newly created elite paramilitary tactical unit known as SWAT initiated a violent battle with a handful of Los Angeles-based members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense (BPP). Five hours and five thousand rounds of ammunition later, three SWAT team members and three Black Panthers lay wounded. From a tactical standpoint, the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) considered the encounter a disaster. For the Panthers and the community that supported them, the shootout symbolized a victory. A key contributor to that victory was the nineteen-year-old rank-and-file member of the BPP Wayne Pharr. Nine Lives of a Black Panther tells Wayne's riveting story of the Los Angeles branch of the BPP and gives a blow-by-blow account of how it prepared for and survived the massive military-style attack. Because of his dedication to the black liberation struggle, Wayne was hunted, beaten, and almost killed by the LAPD in four separate events. Here he reveals how the branch survived attacks such as these, and also why BPP cofounder Huey P. Newton expelled the entire Southern California chapter and deemed it "too dangerous to remain a part of the national organization." The Los Angeles branch was the proving ground for some of the most beloved and colorful characters in Panther lore, including Bunchy Carter, Masai Hewitt, Geronimo "ji-Jaga" Pratt, and Elaine Brown. Nine Lives fills in a missing piece of Black Panther history, while making clear why black Los Angeles was home to two of the most devastating riots in the history of urban America. But it also eloquently relates one man's triumph over police terror, internal warfare, and personal demons. It will doubtless soon take its place among the classics of black militant literature. Read more...
An Appetite for Murder
An Appetite for Murder By Linda Stratmann

The sudden death of overweight 49-year-old Thomas Whibley sparks off an acrimonious furor in Bayswater, and sparks fly between rival diet doctors, vegetarians, and the extremist Pure Food Society. Young sleuth Frances Doughty is hired to find the author of anonymous libels, when a former colleague of Whibley's, Hubert Sweetman, who has served 14 years in prison for a violent robbery he claims he did not commit, asks her to trace his estranged family. Before she can start, however, the police arrive and arrest her client for the murder of his wife. There will be more murders and a vicious attack on Frances before she finally resolves a number of knotty questions. Is Hubert Sweetman really innocent? Where are his missing children? And who wielded the poisoned pen? Read more...
True Colours
True Colours By Stephen Leather

The Russian oligarchs are the world's new elite. They treat the world as their plaything, travelling without borders and living lives of unimaginable luxury without fear or restraint. But when an assassin starts killing off some of the world's richest men, an oligarch with friends in high places seeks the protection of MI5. And Spider Shepherd is placed in the firing line. But while Shepherd has to save the life of a man he neither likes nor respects, he has to deal with a face from his past. The Taliban sniper who put a bullet in his shoulder turns up alive and well and living in London—and Shepherd is in no mood to forgive or forget. Read more...
The Art of Leaving
The Art of Leaving By Anna Stothard

Another stunning literary novel from the author of highly acclaimed The Pink Hotel—longlisted for the Orange Prize, a New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice, and an O Magazine Debut Novel to Pick Up Now "Eva had always considered leaving to be the most pleasurable moment of any relationship. You know where you are with goodbye: you know that mistakes dissolve, doors open, and soon everything will be possible again." Leaving has always come naturally to Eva Elliott. The daughter of a pilot, she spent her childhood leaving schools and cities. Now an adult, she enjoys the thrill of saying goodbye much more than the butterflies of a first smile or kiss. There's so much more potential in walking away, and Eva has always had a dangerously vivid imagination. During a rainy summer in Soho, when she becomes fascinated by a golden eagle that has escaped London Zoo to prowl the city, and a beguiling stranger begins appearing around town armed with a conspiratorial smile and a secret, Eva discovers that endings just aren't as easy as they used to be. Is it a flirtation playing out among the crumbling offices, clubs, and alleys of Soho, or something much darker? The line blurs in this haunting story about saying goodbye. Read more...
The Women's Health Book
The Women's Health Book By The Royal Women's Hospital

As a woman, looking after your health is the most important step you can take towards creating a healthy, happy family and a thriving community. But in today’s busy world, with so many demands on your time, it’s not always easy to find information you can trust. The Women’s Health Book is written specifically for women by health professionals who specialize in women’s health. The Royal Women’s Hospital is the largest health facility specializing in women’s health in Australia and is well placed to help you look after your physical, mental, and social wellbeing. Here you’ll find information and advice for every stage of your life, from adolescence through to older age. Covering everything from menstruation, sexuality, and bullying, to diet, infections, and pregnancy, to mental health, cancer, and arthritis, this is an essential reference for every Australian woman’s shelf. This book is designed to help you participate as an equal partner in your health care. Armed with the real facts, you will be empowered to ask more questions and then make better choices that can help to improve your health, reduce any health risks you face, and even prevent future health problems. Read more...
How Britain Kept Calm and Carried On
How Britain Kept Calm and Carried On By Anton Rippon

A compendium of sentimental, humorous and sometimes laugh-out-loud anecdotes and stories from people who managed to remain positive and look on the bright side of life, How Britain Kept Calm and Carried On offers a new perspective on staying strong and "packing up your troubles" during wartime, and describes moments of light-hearted relief that people found in dark times. Read more...
A Gift for Little Tree
A Gift for Little Tree By Colleen D.C. Marquez

A parable about adoption, this charming story tells of an apple tree who is unable to bear fruit—no matter how hard she tries—until a wise farmer finds a way. He grafts a bud onto Little Tree's limb, and in time she becomes the most colorful tree in the orchard. All those who have experienced the bonds of family in more ways than one will share in Little Tree’s delight when she discovers that it does not matter if her apples came from another tree; she loves them as her very own. Existing adoptive parents, as well as those exploring the possibility of adoption for the first time, will find Little Tree's story especially touching. The book also honors the birth mother in a unique way, helping children understand how love is the motivation for her actions. Read more...
Jordan and the Dreadful Golem
Jordan and the Dreadful Golem By Karen Goldman, Illustrated by Rachel Moseley

The children of the Israeli town of Keshet are born with the ability to bend nature to their will and 13-year-old Jordan has just discovered his gift of the power to transform into water. All of Jordan’s friends have unique powers: Noam can alter cloud formations, Ellah can spin webs, and little Eden can create the strange animals she sees in her dreams. No one knows the source of these powers except, perhaps, Miss Sara, the mysterious town matriarch who helps the children find and control their talents using Kabbalah and other mystical teachings from Israel’s forgotten past. However, someone has discovered the secret of the children of Keshet, and wants to use their powers for his own sinister purposes. To prevent such a disaster, Jordan and his friends must use their gifts to defeat an enemy who wields the power to erase the line between the living and the dead. Incorporating Jewish mythology and referencing various practices of Judaism, this book is a tale of friendship and the power of teamwork in the face of adversity. Read more...
Creative Paper Quilling
Creative Paper Quilling By Ann Martin

Creative Paper Quilling contains 28 brand new and exciting quilled designs. Join Ann Martin and other accomplished quilling artists as they share expert technique information, helpful tips and eye-catching designs that are sure to appeal to crafters of all skill levels. Enjoy creating greeting cards for a variety of occasions, charming ornaments for your favorite holidays, stylish jewelry pieces to enhance your wardrobe, and unique wall art and home accents. The Quilling Basics chapter equips readers with sufficient knowledge of supplies and tools to get them started. The Shape Gallery includes images of the quilled shapes used in the book and provides instructions and step-by-step details needed to create each shape. Read more...
The Quack Doctor
The Quack Doctor By Caroline Rance

From the harangues of mountebanks to the dubious advertisements in Victorian newspapers, quackery sports a colorful history. Featuring entertaining advertisements from historical newspapers, this book investigates the inventive ways in which quack remedies were promoted – and whether the people who bought them should be written off as gullible after all. There's the Methodist minister and his museum of intestinal worms, the obesity cure that turned fat into sweat, and the device that brought the fresh air of Italy into British homes. The story of quack advertising is bawdy, gruesome, funny, and sometimes moving – and in this book it takes to the stage to promote itself as a fascinating part of the history of medicine. Read more...
The Gift of the Magi
The Gift of the Magi By O. Henry, Illustrated by Sonja Danowski

Della and Jim love each other very much but have no money for getting Christmas gifts for one another. But when Della decides to make a great sacrifice that will give her enough money to buy the present Jim deserves, she soon discovers that that her selfless act may have been for naught. This is a new, richly illustrated interpretation of the well-loved, poignant short story by O. Henry. Read more...
The Magus of Hay
The Magus of Hay By Phil Rickman

When a man's body is discovered in the picturesque town of Hay-on-Wye, his death appears to be "unnatural" in every sense. Merrily Watkins, parish priest, single mother, and exorcist, is drafted in to investigate, in this 12th installment. A man's body is found below a waterfall. It looks like suicide or an accidental drowning—until DI Frannie Bliss enters the dead man's home. What he finds there sends him to Merrily Watkins, the Diocese of Hereford's official advisor on the paranormal. It's been nearly 40 years since Hay was declared an independent state by its self-styled king—a development seen at the time as a joke, a publicity scam. But behind this pastiche a dark design was taking shape, creating a hidden history of murder and ritual-magic, the relics of which are only now becoming horribly visible. It's a situation that will take Merrily Watkins—alone for the first time in years—to the edge of madness. Read more...